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  • 1.
    Jørgensen, Sveinung
    et al.
    Høgskolen i Lillehammer.
    Tynes Pedersen, Lars Jacob
    Department of Accounting, Auditing and Law, Norwegian School of Economics and Business Administration.
    What’s the problem? A problem-based approach to the reform of the Norwegian drug rehabilitation sector2010In: European Journal of Social Work, ISSN 1369-1457, E-ISSN 1468-2664, Vol. 13, no 3, p. 339-357Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 2.
    Olsson, Eva
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Department of Social and Psychological Studies (from 2013).
    Sundh, Mona
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Social Studies.
    Perception of time in relation to work and private life among Swedish social workers: the temporal clash between the organisation and the individual2018In: European Journal of Social Work, ISSN 1369-1457, E-ISSN 1468-2664, Vol. 22, no 4, p. 690-701Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Time, or rather lack of time, is currently an issue to many involved in social work, in Sweden and elsewhere. Stress at work is presently one of the most common reasons social workers state for leaving their profession or their workplace. This article examines how time is perceived in relation to work and private life by employees in the social services. The investigation was conducted as a qualitative interview study with six social workers. An abductive approach was adopted in the analysis. The results indicate a general experience of lack of time and an individual perception of time among the interviewees. What they say about time indicates that they have a monochronic perspective on time. It is also shown that the respondents use different curbing strategies to recuperate. At work, strategies take the form of creating recovery arenas allowing for micropauses such as eating an apple or having a cup of coffee. After work, exercising or strolling in the woods are common strategies. In relation to the employer and the organisation individuals also assume responsibility for organisational shortcomings that they cannot influence. © 2018 Informa UK Limited, trading as Taylor & Francis Group

  • 3.
    Steigen, Anne Mari
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Department of Social and Psychological Studies (from 2013).
    Kogstad, Ragnfrid Eline
    Hummelvoll, Jan Kåre
    Green Care services in the Nordic countries: an integrative literature review2016In: European Journal of Social Work, ISSN 1369-1457, E-ISSN 1468-2664, Vol. 19, no 5, p. 692-715Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article reviews Nordic literature on Green Care for people out of work orschool, or with mental health- and/or drug-related problems, published from1995 to April 2014. Green Care is a well-established international concept thatuses animals, plants and nature in an active process to offer health-promotingactivities for people. Reports, evaluations and scientific articles are included. Themainfinding was that the Green Care services described in the literatureprovided positive activities for our target group. Seven main categories emergedduring the analysis: mastery and coping, positive effects on mental health,physical activity, structure and meaningfulness, the feeling of dignity producedby performing a decent ordinary job, social gains, animals and natureexperienced as being supportive. Essential intervention factors identified can bedescribed as: (i) contact with animals, (ii) supportive natural environments,(iii) the service leader as a significant important other, (iv) social acceptance andfellowship with other participants and (v) meaningful and individually adaptedactivities in which mastery can be experienced. Thesefive components interact ina holistic way; the synergetic effects extend the sum of the single factors.

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