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  • 1.
    Arsenovic, Jasenko
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Service Research Center (from 2013). Karlstad Univ, Ctr Tjansteforskning CTF, Serv Res Ctr, S-65188 Karlstad, Sweden..
    Edvardsson, Bo
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Service Research Center (from 2013). Karlstad Univ, Ctr Tjansteforskning CTF, Serv Res Ctr, S-65188 Karlstad, Sweden.;Inland Norway Univ Appl Sci, Dept Mkt, N-2411 Elverum, Norway..
    Tronvoll, Bård
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Service Research Center (from 2013). Karlstad Univ, Ctr Tjansteforskning CTF, Serv Res Ctr, S-65188 Karlstad, Sweden.;Inland Norway Univ Appl Sci, Dept Mkt, N-2411 Elverum, Norway..
    Moving Toward Collaborative Service Recovery: A Multiactor Orientation2019In: Service Science, ISSN 2164-3962, E-ISSN 2164-3970, Vol. 11, no 3, p. 201-212Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Service recovery research has traditionally been firm-centric, focusing primarily on the time and effort expended by firms in addressing service failures. The subsequent shift to a customer-centric orientation addressed the customer's role in recovery situations, and the recent dyadic orientation has explored the effectiveness of their joint efforts. However, earlier conceptualizations failed to take adequate account of the complexity of service recovery encounters in which multiple actors collaborate and integrate resources. This study explores how multiactor collaborations influence the customer's experience of service recovery by adopting a multiactor orientation and by applying service-dominant logic. After reviewing the customer experience literature, a collaborative recovery experience framework is developed that emphasizes the joint efforts of multiple actors and customers to achieve a favorable recovery experience. In a contextualization, the usefulness of the new framework to explain customer experiences in collaborative service processes is shown. Finally, further research avenues are proposed.

  • 2.
    Siltaloppi, Jaakko
    et al.
    Aalto University School of Science.
    Koskela-Huotari, Kaisa
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Service Research Center (from 2013).
    Vargo, Stephen L.
    University of Hawai’i at Manoa.
    Institutional Complexity as a Driver for Innovation in Service Ecosystems2016In: Service Science, ISSN 2164-3962, E-ISSN 2164-3970, Vol. 8, no 3, p. 333-343Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper extends research on innovation as institutional change within service science and service-dominant (S-D) logic by conceptualizing the emergence of novel solutions in service ecosystems. We pay particular attention to how actors (individuals and organizations) are able to create new solutions that change the very institutional arrangements that guide and constrain them. We propose that institutional complexity—the multiplicity of institutional arrangements confronting actors with conflicting prescriptions for action—drives the emergence of novelty. Institutional complexity reduces the influence of prevailing institutions by activating conscious problem solving and making available multiple institutional “toolkits.” These dynamic toolkits consist of the cultural norms and meanings, as well as material practices, associated with specific institutional arrangements, with which actors can jointly reconstruct and change value cocreation practices and advance change in the institutional arrangements of service ecosystems. This paper contributes to service science and S-D logic by providing a more comprehensive understanding of innovation driven by institutional complexity, in which the stability of institutional arrangements is reconciled with the actor-driven creation of novel solutions constitutive of institutional change. 

  • 3.
    Tronvoll, Bård
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Service Research Center (from 2013). Inland Norway Univ Appl Sci, N-2418 Elverum, Norway.;Karlstad Univ, CTF Serv Res Ctr, S-65188 Karlstad, Sweden..
    Edvardsson, Bo
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Service Research Center (from 2013). Inland Norway Univ Appl Sci, N-2418 Elverum, Norway.;Karlstad Univ, CTF Serv Res Ctr, S-65188 Karlstad, Sweden..
    Exploring Customers' Experiences of Service Co-Recovery2019In: Service Science, ISSN 2164-3962, E-ISSN 2164-3970, Vol. 11, no 3, p. 189-200Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The occurrence of a service recovery situation shows that the intended service exchange has failed because resource integration has failed. In the co-recovery process, multiple actors (including the customer) interact to cocreate a favorable customer experience following this service failure. The aim of this paper is to extend an existing understanding of the activities and interactions that serve as resource integration drivers in customer co-recovery experiences. The article explores recovery situations in an interview-based empirical study. Based on the findings, the study develops an empirically derived model (5C), identifying and defining drivers of customer co-recovery and suggesting how firms should engage customers and other actors in the process. To heighten the practical implications, the study conceptualizes the customer recovery process by suggesting a "wheel of customer co-recovery" model. Overall, the article contributes to a deeper understanding of service recovery and the drivers of customers' experiences of service co-recovery.

  • 4.
    Wetter-Edman, Katarina
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Service Research Center (from 2013).
    Sangiorgi, Daniela
    Univ Lancaster, ImaginationLancaster, Lancaster LA1 4YW, England..
    Edvardsson, Bo
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Economic Sciences, Communication and IT, Service Research Center.
    Holmlid, Stefan
    Linkoping Univ, Dept Comp & Informat Sci, S-58183 Linkoping, Sweden..
    Gronroos, Christian
    Hanken Sch Econ, Dept Mkt, Helsinki 00101, Finland..
    Mattelmaki, Tuuli
    Aalto Univ, Sch Arts Design & Architecture, Dept Design, Helsinki 00076, Finland..
    Design for Value Co-Creation: Exploring Synergies Between Design for Service and Service Logic2014In: Service Science, ISSN 2164-3962, E-ISSN 2164-3970, Vol. 6, no 2, p. 106-121Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper aims to bridge recent work on Service Logic with practice and research in the Design for Service to explore whether and how human-centered collaborative design approaches could provide a source for interpreting existing service systems and proposing new ones and thus realize a Service Logic in organizations. A comparison is made of existing theoretical backgrounds and frameworks from Service Logic and Design for Service studies that conceptualize core concepts for value co-creation: actors, resources, resource integration, service systems, participation, context, and experience. We find that Service Logic provides a framework for understanding service systems in action by focusing on how actors integrate resources to co-create value for themselves and others, whereas Design for Service provides an approach and tools to explore current service systems as a context to imagine future service systems and how innovation may develop as a result of reconfigurations of resources and actors. Design for Service also provides approaches, competences, and tools that enable involved actors to participate in and be a part of the service system redesign. Design for value co-creation is presented using this model. The paper builds on and extends the Service Logic research first by repositioning service design from a phase of development to Design for Service as an approach to service innovation, centered on understanding and engaging with customers' own value-creating practices. Second, it builds on and extends through discussing the meaning of value co-creation and identifying and distinguishing collaborative approaches for the generation of new resource constellations. In doing so, the collaborative approaches allow for achieving value co-creation in designing.

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