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  • 1.
    Grahn, Tonje
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Centre for Climate and Safety (from 2013).
    Nyberg, Lars
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Centre for Climate and Safety (from 2013).
    Assessment of pluvial flood exposure and vulnerability of residential areas2017In: International Journal of Disaster Risk Reduction, E-ISSN 2212-4209, Vol. 21, p. 367-375Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 2.
    Grahn, Tonje
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Environmental and Life Sciences.
    Nyberg, Rolf
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Centre for Climate and Safety.
    Damage assessment of lake floods: Insured damage to private property during two lake floods in Sweden 2000/20012014In: International Journal of Disaster Risk Reduction, E-ISSN 2212-4209, Vol. 10, p. 305-314Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study analyses empirical data on the direct damage impact of lake floods using insurance claims for 195 private buildings. A relationship between lake water levels and insurance payments is established, but the estimated economic effects are small. Building damage also occurs in fringe areas that are not reached by surface water, which indicates a complex interplay between several factors influencing the degree of damage. Large lake floods occur over an extended time span (months). Their duration, as well as possible wind effects, should be taken into account in flood risk assessment. The slow onset of lake floods facilitates implementation of private damage-reducing measures in addition to public mitigation efforts. Private damage-reducing measures decrease the risk of structural damage to buildings, easing recovery for homeowners and society as a whole. Insurance companies can gain from investing in public flood awareness programmes and by providing information to their insurance holders on how to reduce property vulnerability in emergency situations.

  • 3.
    Johansson, Magnus
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Centre for Climate and Safety.
    Data sources on small-scale disaster losses and response: A Swedish case study of extreme rainfalls 2000–20122015In: International Journal of Disaster Risk Reduction, E-ISSN 2212-4209, Vol. 12, p. 93-101Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Societal interest to evaluate and learn from disasters is scale dependent. Low frequent hazards with small impacts are often invisible at national level from an evaluation point of view and limited possibilities exist to compile publicly available data on losses and management in the aftermath. This study presents an inventory of possible data sources for 14 extreme rainfall events in Sweden 2000-2012. The sources, such as official sectorial institutions and media, and their content are analyzed in relation to reliability and verification opportunities. The use of free-text fields in official reporting systems and questionnaires, primarily designed for basic data capture from daily occurring accidents, is highlighted as important to achieve enhanced data that can be used to verify information from other sources, especially media archives.

  • 4.
    Johansson, Magnus
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Centre for Climate and Safety (from 2013).
    Experience of data collection in support of the assessment of global progress in the Sendai Framework for Disaster Risk Reduction 2015-2030-A Swedish pilot study2017In: International Journal of Disaster Risk Reduction, E-ISSN 2212-4209, Vol. 24, p. 144-150Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Most countries collect loss and damage data after disasters for learning purposes and in support of future preventive work. The lack of international standards and sharing principles implies heterogeneous data sets, thus presenting a challenge to the development of indicators intended to assess progress within the UN agreement Sendai Framework for Disaster Risk Reduction 2015-2030 (SFDRR). In this study, data on mortality, affected people and direct economic losses are extracted from two national databases in Sweden for the years 1996-2015. Pre-SFDRR terminology, definitions and different inclusion criteria are used to exemplify and identify challenges when global "proxy" data inquiry clashes with sub-national demands for data quality. Different test methods on how to estimate affected people are used and in comparison with the term 'directly affected people', as proposed in the SFDRR indicator establishment process, it is concluded that methods for more disaggregated data are needed. In a Swedish context, the SFDRR call for a reference period 2005-2015 is found to be a time too short for providing a fair picture of disaster risks within Sweden's borders. The nationally developed strategy in Sweden, as in many other countries, to learn in-depth after each new disaster and use the experience to remedy weaknesses in safety systems, generates solid data supporting the development of SFDRR indicators, but the national benefits and the relevance of statistics from disasters re-occurring on longer time scales are limited.

  • 5. Noren, Viveca
    et al.
    Hedelin, Beatrice
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Environmental and Life Sciences (from 2013).
    Nyberg, Lars
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Environmental and Life Sciences (from 2013).
    Bishop, Kevin
    Flood risk assessment: Practices in flood prone Swedish municipalities2016In: International Journal of Disaster Risk Reduction, E-ISSN 2212-4209, Vol. 18, p. 206-217Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Risk assessments are important to ensure efficient and effective flood risk management. Methods and strategies for flood risk assessment are described in the literature, but less is known about how assessments are actually performed. We have studied local flood risk assessments in Sweden by interviewing flood risk managers in municipalities and analyzing documentation of flood risk assessment efforts. There is a large variation between municipalities in how flood risk assessment has been done. The efforts made in association with the EU Floods Directive together with a Government Commission about a flood in Lake Malaren are the most advanced assessments. Only a few of the municipalities have done comparable assessments. Generally, however, there is a lack of experience and theoretical knowledge about concepts and methods of flood risk assessment in the municipalities. In the assessments studied, the flood itself had been rather well defined in hazard maps. The consequences of a flood had been studied in the larger projects but only by half of the municipalities. It is mainly direct, tangible consequences that have been included. It is mainly the exposure of assets that has been investigated while little attention has been paid to vulnerability. To improve flood risk assessment in Sweden there is a need for knowledge and resources in the municipalities. Prioritization and motivation are needed to actually perform the assessments. National guidelines for may be helpful to guide municipalities in this work and to have more uniform risk assessment. (C) 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  • 6.
    Rydstedt Nyman, Monika
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013).
    Johansson, Magnus
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Centre for Climate and Safety.
    Merits of using a socio-technical system perspective and different industrial accident investigation methods on accidents following natural hazards: A case study on pluvial flooding of a Swedish railway tunnel 20132015In: International Journal of Disaster Risk Reduction, E-ISSN 2212-4209, Vol. 13, p. 189-199Article in journal (Refereed)
1 - 6 of 6
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