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  • 1.
    Abecasis, David
    et al.
    University of the Algarve, Portugal.
    Steckenreuter, Andre
    University of the Azores, Portugal.
    Reubens, Jan
    Flanders Marine Institute, Belgium.
    Aaestrup, Kim
    DTU, Denmark.
    Alos, Josep
    Instituto Mediterráneo de Estudios Avanzados (CSIC-UIB), Spain.
    Badalamenti, Fabio
    CNR-IAMC, Italy.
    Bajona, Lenore
    Dalhousie University, Canada.
    Boylan, Patrick
    Loughs Agency, UK.
    Deneudt, Klaas
    Flanders Marine Institute, Belgium.
    Greenberg, Larry
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Environmental and Life Sciences (from 2013).
    Brevé, Niels
    Sportfisserij Nederland, The Netherlands.
    Hernandez, Francisco
    Flanders Marine Institute, Belgium.
    Humphries, Nick
    The Marine Biological Association of the U.K, UK.
    Meyer, Carl
    University of Hawai’i at Mānoa, USA.
    Sims, David
    University of Southampton, UK.
    Thorstad, Eva B.
    Norwegian Institute for Nature Research (NINA), Norway.
    Walker, Alan M.
    Centre for Environment, Fisheries and Aquaculture Science (Cefas), UK.
    Whoriskey, Fred
    Dalhousie University, Canada.
    Alfonso, Pedro
    University of the Azores, Portugal.
    A review of acoustic telemetry in Europe and the need for a regional aquatic telemetry network2018In: Animal Biotelemetry, ISSN 2050-3385, E-ISSN 2050-3385, Vol. 6, p. 1-7, article id 12Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Globally, there are a large and growing number of researchers using biotelemetry as a tool to studyaquatic animals. In Europe, this community lacks a formal network structure. The aim of this study is to review the useof acoustic telemetry in Europe and document the contribution of cross-boundary studies and inter-research groupcollaborations. Based on this, we explore the potential benefits and challenges of a network approach to identifyfuture priorities and best practices for aquatic biotelemetry research in Europe.

    Results: Over the past decade, there was an approximately sevenfold increase in the number of acoustic telemetrystudies published on marine and diadromous species in Europe compared to a sixfold increase globally. Over 90%of these studies were conducted on fishes and undertaken in coastal areas, estuaries, or rivers. 75% of these studieswere conducted by researchers based in one of five nations (Norway, UK, France, Portugal, and Spain) and, eventhough 34% were based on collaborations between scientists from several countries, there was only one study withan acoustic receiver array that extended beyond the borders of a single country. In recent years, acoustic telemetryin European waters has evolved from studying behavioural aspects of animals (82.2%), into more holistic approachesaddressing management-related issues (10%), tagging methods and effects (5%), and technology and data analysisdevelopment (2.8%).

    Conclusions: Despite the increasing number of publications and species tracked, there is a prominent lack ofplanned and structured acoustic telemetry collaborations in Europe. A formal pan-European network structure wouldpromote the development of (1) a research platform that could benefit the acoustic telemetry community throughcapacity building, (2) a centralized database, and (3) key deployment sites and studies on priority species requiringresearch in Europe. A network may increase efficiency, expand the scope of research that can be undertaken, promoteEuropean science integration, enhance the opportunities and success of acquiring research funding and, ultimately,foster regional and transatlantic collaborations. It may also help address research priorities such as the large-scalesocietal challenges arising from climate change impacts and assist the EU’s Marine Strategy Framework Directive viaidentification of good environmental status of endangered or commercially important species.

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