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  • 1.
    Björkström, Monica
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013).
    Johansson, Inger
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Health Sciences.
    Athlin, Elsy
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Nursing.
    An attempt to improve nurses' interest in and use of research in clinical practice by means of network support to facilitator nurses2014In: Journal of Nursing Education and Practice, ISSN 1925-4040, E-ISSN 1925-4059, Vol. 4, no 3, p. 58-68Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Scientific knowledge is expected to be used in clinical practice to ensure that patients are given evidence-based nursing care. Therefore, in order to improve nurses’ research utilisation in clinical practice a network had been provided for nurses especially interested in nursing development in eleven wards. These nurses were expected to take on the role of key person (facilitator) for nursing development in clinical practice.Aim: The study was aimed at describing nurses’ interest in nursing research, how network support to ‘facilitator nurses’ could improve development in patient care based on evidence, and what hindering factors for such development could be.Methods: One and a half years after onset of the project a follow-up study was conducted with a questionnaire answered by 75 (64%) nurses, and group interviews with nine facilitators and eleven head nurses.Findings: The nurses’ interest in research utilisation was in general high and in eight wards development work had started. The facilitator nurses had mostly worked without involving their colleagues. Hindering factors for nursing development were related to time, EBP knowledge, involvement and the interest of head nurses and colleagues. Education, work place, previous participation in research projects, and participation in the network impacted positively on nurses’ attitudes to and interest in research.Conclusion and implication for clinical practice: Providing networks to ‘facilitator nurses’ in the ward could be useful for developing nursing care based on research findings. However, support from nurse leaders, involvement of the whole nursing staff, and training in research utilisation are important factors for success.

  • 2.
    Løvlien, Mona
    et al.
    Högskolan i Gjövik.
    Mundal, Liv
    Oslo universitetssjukhus.
    Hall-Lord, Marie-Louise
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013).
    Physical activity in women after an acute myocardial infarction.2015In: Journal of Nursing Education and Practice, ISSN 1925-4040, E-ISSN 1925-4059, Vol. 5, no 8, p. 76-81Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Physical activity is recognized as being important in reducing mortality after an acute myocardial infarction. The study aimed to describe younger and older women’s leisure time physical activity after an acute myocardial infarction, their motivations and barriers for engaging in physical activity and to assess aspects associated with referral and attendance in cardiac rehabilitation programmes.

    Methods: Women diagnosed with an acute myocardial infarction were consecutively recruited and answered a questionnaire 2-3 months after hospital discharge.

    Results: The majority of the respondents (86%) were physically active after their acute myocardial infarction and 34% were physically active 4 days a week for 30 minutes. Respondents 66 years were less likely than respondents < 66 years to report moderate physical activity (39% vs. 58%, p = .03) and more likely to report low physical activity (27% vs. 8%, p < .01). No differences were found between these age groups reporting high physical activity (34% vs. 34%). Respondents 66 years were also less likely than younger respondents to maintain or increase their physical activity after the acute event (59% vs. 76%, p < .01), to be informed about the significance of physical activity while in hospital (61% vs. 80%, p = .01), to be referred to a cardiac rehabilitation programme (49% vs. 75%, p .01) and to attend such a programme (30% vs. 65%, p < .01).

    Conclusions: Women’s age was associated with physical activity as well as their possibilities regarding cardiac rehabilitation after an acute myocardial infarction.

  • 3.
    Skundberg Kletthagen, Hege
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013). Högskolan i Gjövik.
    Wangensteen, Sigrid
    Faculty of Health, Care and Nursing, Department of Nursing, Gjøvik University College, Gjøvik, Norway.
    Hall-Lord, Marie-Louise
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Health Sciences. aculty of Health, Care and Nursing, Department of Nursing, Gjøvik University College, Gjøvik, Norway.
    Hedelin, Birgitta
    aculty of Health, Care and Nursing, Department of Nursing, Gjøvik University College, Gjøvik, Norway.
    Experiences of the psychiatric specialist health services: The perspective of relatives of inpatients with severe depression2015In: Journal of Nursing Education and Practice, ISSN 1925-4040, E-ISSN 1925-4059, Vol. 5, no 2, p. 1-7Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study was to describe experiences of encountering the psychiatric specialist health services as a relative of an inpatient with severe depression. A qualitative and descriptive design using a phenomenographic approach was chosen. Twentyfour adult relatives, representing different ages, sex, level of education and relationship, were individually interviewed. Approvalwas given by the Regional Committee for Medical and Health Research Ethics, Norway (South East). Three descriptive categoriesemerged: Being in need of help, Being a resource and a participant and Being confident with the health care, with twoconceptions each constituting the relatives’ experiences of the psychiatric specialist health services. When relatives perceive that their next of kin is more severely depressed than the health professionals indicate, they describe it as a battle to obtain help. Relatives have knowledge of – and experience with the depressed person, and wish to share this with the staff. The relatives describe uncertainty as to whether the patient received high-quality care due to varying competence levels among mental health personnel. In conclusion, relatives’ experiences and knowledge about the depressed person were not acknowledged as a matter of course. Thus, psychiatric specialist health services must take relatives’ knowledge into account and initiate collaboration and support.

  • 4.
    Tosterud, Randi
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Health Sciences (from 2013). Department of Nursing, Faculty of Health, Care and Nursing, Gjøvik University College, Gjøvik, Norway.
    Hall-Lord, Marie-Louise
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Health Sciences (from 2013). Department of Nursing, Faculty of Health, Care and Nursing, Gjøvik University College, Gjøvik, Norway.
    Petzäll, Kerstin
    Department of Nursing, Faculty of Health, Care and Nursing, Gjøvik University College, Gjøvik, Norway.
    Hedelin, Birgitta
    Department of Nursing, Faculty of Health, Care and Nursing, Gjøvik University College, Gjøvik, Norway.
    Debriefing in simulation conducted in small and large groups: Nursing students’ experiences2014In: Journal of Nursing Education and Practice, ISSN 1925-4040, E-ISSN 1925-4059, Vol. 4, no 9, p. 173-182Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The debriefing phase in human patient simulation is considered to be crucial for learning. To ensure good learning conditions, the use of small groups is recommended, which poses a major challenge when the student count is high. The use of large groups may provide an alternative for typical lecture-style education and contribute to a more frequently and repeated training which is considered to be important for achieving simulation competency. The purpose of the present study was to describe nursing students’ experiences obtained during the debriefing conducted in small and large groups with the use of a qualitative descriptive approach. The informants had participated in a human patient simulation situation either in large or small groups. Data was collected through the use of five focus-group interviews and analysed by content analysis. The findings showed that independent of group-size the informants experienced the learning strategies to be unfamiliar and intrusive, and in the large groups to such an extent that learning was hampered. Debriefing was perceived as offering excellent opportunities for transferable learning, and activity, predictability and preparedness were deemed essential. Small groups provided the best learning conditions in that safety and security were ensured, but were perceived as providing limited challenges to accommodate professional requirements as a nurse. Simulation competency as a prerequisite for learning was shown not to be developed isolated in conjunction with simulation, but depends on a systematic effort to build a learning community in the programme in general. The faculty needs to support the students to be conscious and accustomed to learning as a heightened experience of learning out of their comfort zone.

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