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  • 1.
    Arvidson, Markus
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Department of Social and Psychological Studies.
    Axelsson, Jonas
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Karlstad Business School.
    Exploring self-loyalty in the context of social acceleration: Theorising loyalties as emotions and resistance2017In: Journal of Political Power, ISSN 2158-379X, E-ISSN 2158-3803, Vol. 10, no 2, p. 133-148Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article is a theoretical exploration of a layer of loyalty called self-loyalty. We define self-loyalty as an emotion that is channelled through social forms. To show the usage and relevance of the concept we present social acceleration as a contextualisation. Two self-loyalty strategies in relation to acceleration are discussed: a voluntary form based on resistance and an involuntary form based on acceptance and 'playing the game'.

  • 2.
    Baaz, Mikael
    et al.
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Heikkinen, Satu
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Department of Social and Psychological Studies (from 2013).
    Lilja, Mona
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Department of Social and Psychological Studies (from 2013). Sociologi.
    Editorial2017In: Journal of Political Power, ISSN 2158-379X, E-ISSN 2158-3803, Vol. 10, no 2, p. 127-132Article, review/survey (Other academic)
  • 3. Baaz, MIkael
    et al.
    Heikkinen, Satu
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Department of Social and Psychological Studies (from 2013).
    Lilja, Mona
    Editorial: Special Issue. Resistance and Emotions.2017In: Journal of Political Power, ISSN 2158-379X, E-ISSN 2158-3803, Vol. 10, no 2, p. 127-132Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 4.
    Haraldsson, Anna-Lena
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Department of Social and Psychological Studies (from 2013).
    Lilja, Mona
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Department of Social and Psychological Studies (from 2013).
    Resistance against material artefacts: university spaces, administrative online systems and emotions2017In: Journal of Political Power, ISSN 2158-379X, E-ISSN 2158-3803, Vol. 10, no 2, p. 166-183Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article traces some of the attempts that have been made to analyse time and emotions in order to gain a broader understanding of how power and resistance entangle in online administrative systems in university spaces. Rising levels of Internet usage in the university sector, and society in general, imply a new era for public administration. Online administrative systems have moved into the university sector, creating different reactions, new practices, temporalities and emotions. The administrative online systems, which govern through, as our respondents understand it, various time-consuming scripts (for example, the travel expenses programmes or programmes regulating working hours or duty periods) or through online communication systems (for example, emailing), give rise to a rich and varied resistance against the different systems, which informs the employees' temporalities and spent time (clock time). Among other things, people reacted emotionally with avoidance, time-travel, manipulations, ignorance and by exact rule following.

  • 5.
    Henriksson, Andreas
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Department of Social and Psychological Studies (from 2013).
    Norm-critical rationality: Emotions and the institutional influence of queer resistance2017In: Journal of Political Power, ISSN 2158-379X, E-ISSN 2158-3803, Vol. 10, no 2, p. 149-165Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Norm critique is a recent discourse and practice in Sweden that is associated with queer resistance. It is taken up as a mode of governance in several Swedish institutions and companies. At face value, norm critique allows queer resistance to have a direct impact on institutional sources of norms in society. However, this article argues that such a shift in queer resistance replaces the queer emotionally overt subject with a rationalist style of emoting. It also argues that norm critique (re)institutes a subject position that paradoxically sides with contemporary forms of power and its demands for emotional competence.

  • 6.
    Lilja, Mona
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Department of Social and Psychological Studies. School of Global Studies, University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Dangerous bodies, matter and emotions: public assemblies and embodied resistance2017In: Journal of Political Power, ISSN 2158-379X, E-ISSN 2158-3803, Vol. 10, no 3, p. 342-352Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Departing from Judith Butler's ground-breaking book Notes toward a Performative Theory of Assembly, this article will explore why extra cultural meaning is attached to resisting bodies that are involved in demonstrating assemblies. Across the globe resistance is played out by bodies that occupy pavements, streets and squares. The participants in public assemblies, are taking part in various emotional processes while coming together to struggle against, for example, disenfranchisement, effacement and abandonment. In embodied, coordinated actions of resistance the gathering itself signifies something in excess of what is being said at the event; there is a distinction between forms of linguistic performativity and forms of bodily performativity. By bringing in the concepts of emotions and matter, this paper will explore how and why resisting bodies signify something else/more than the vocalised or linguistic demands that they are making.

  • 7.
    Lilja, Mona
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Department of Social and Psychological Studies (from 2013). School of Global studies, University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Baaz, Mikael
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Schulz, Michael
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Vinthagen, Stellan
    University of Massachusetts, USA; University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    How resistance encourages resistance: Theorizing the nexus between power, ‘Organised Resistance’ and ‘Everyday Resistance’2017In: Journal of Political Power, ISSN 2158-379X, E-ISSN 2158-3803, Vol. 10, no 1, p. 40-54Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Lately, the concept of 'resistance' has gained considerable traction as a tool for critically exploring subaltern practices in relation to power. Few researchers, however, have elaborated on the inter-linkage of shifting forms of resistance; and above all, how acts of everyday resistance entangle with more organized and sometimes mass-based resistance activities. In this paper, these entanglements are analysed by taking into consideration the connections between articulations of resistance and technologies of power. Empirical observations from Cambodia are theorized in order to provide better theoretical tools for searching and investigating the inter-linkage between different resistance forms that contribute to social change. In addition, it is argued that modalities of power and its related resistance must be understood, or theorized, in relation to the concepts of 'agency', 'self-reflexivity' and 'techniques of the self'.

  • 8.
    Lindqvist, Mona
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Department of Social and Psychological Studies (from 2013).
    Olsson, Eva
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Department of Social and Psychological Studies (from 2013).
    Everyday resistance in psychiatry through harbouring strategies2017In: Journal of Political Power, ISSN 2158-379X, E-ISSN 2158-3803, Vol. 10, no 2, p. 200-218Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this article is to study emotion management by focusing on emotion labour in relation to organisational resistance in psychiatry. Drawing on focus group interviews and individual interviews with 11 therapists in psychiatry, and on theories of emotion management and harbouring work (i.e. managing emotion work and renewing energy in a team), we argue that individual workers in psychiatry have to create strategies on their own. The main findings show that emotions are harboured alone and resistance strategies created in solitude can be characterised as everyday resistance and organisational misbehaviour, performed in deep backstage spaces such as the bathroom.

  • 9.
    Sørensen, Majken Jul
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Department of Social and Psychological Studies (from 2013).
    Rigby, Andrew
    Coventry University, UK.
    Frontstage and backstage emotion management in civil resistance2017In: Journal of Political Power, ISSN 2158-379X, E-ISSN 2158-3803, Vol. 10, no 2, p. 219-235Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Civil resistance requires significant forms of emotion management by activists. In this paper, we distinguish between the different foci of emotion management carried out frontstage and backstage – the frontstage focus is typically oriented to influencing the emotions of onlookers, opponents and other targets, the backstage focus is typically concerned with managing the emotions of the activists themselves in preparation for their frontstage performances. Of course, in any particular resistance activity the two dimensions of emotion management interact more or less continuously. Activists need to continually engage in impression-management to ensure they are maintaining their display of the appropriate emotions intended to evoke the desired emotional response in the targets of their performance.

  • 10.
    Wettergren, Åsa
    et al.
    University of Gothenburg, Göteborg, Sweden.
    Jansson, André
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Economic Sciences, Communication and IT.
    Emotions, Power and Space in the Discourse of ’People of the Real World’2013In: Journal of Political Power, ISSN 2158-379X, E-ISSN 2158-3803, Vol. 6, no 3, p. 419-439Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The article investigates the discursive trope of ‘People of the Real World’ (PRW) as it was launched by the leader of the Swedish Christian Democrats, Göran Hägglund, during a political campaign week on the Island of Gotland in 2009. Sociological and cultural theories of local vs. cosmopolitan identity, of emotions, and of space, are used to analyse the speech and a selection of newspaper articles from 2009. The PRW discourse defends local, sedentary communities against globalization and cosmopolitanization. It draws on the collective emotional resources of ‘normals’ as they feel threatened by the social and political advancement of previously marginalized groups, undermining the former group’s power to define social space. It thus contributes to the social and political cultivation of resentment among those who identify with conservative, anti-cosmopolitan values.

  • 11.
    Wiksell, Kristin
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Department of Social and Psychological Studies.
    Campaigning for cooperatives as resistance to neoliberal capitalism2017In: Journal of Political Power, ISSN 2158-379X, E-ISSN 2158-3803, Vol. 10, no 2, p. 236-254Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article investigates the eventual performance of critical resistance to neoliberal capitalism in the discourse of a marketing campaign that promotes the organisational form of cooperatives. Through discourse analysis, this article shows that the performed resistance activity in the campaign discourse is non-critical resistance since the dominant discourse of neoliberal capitalism is reproduced. The analysis displays that affective and economic articulations are intertwined in resistance through the discursive promotion of cooperation. The article contributes to understandings of cooperation as potential resistance to neoliberal capitalism, and highlights the risk of resistance simultaneously reproducing the power of dominant discourses. 

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