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  • 1.
    Alsarve, Daniel
    et al.
    Orebro Univ, Dept Hlth Sci, Orebro, Sweden.;Sports Confederat Orebro Cty, Orebro, Sweden..
    Angelin, Mathias
    Sports Confederat Orebro Cty, Orebro, Sweden.;Karlstad Univ, Dept Hlth Sci, Orebro, Sweden..
    'It's freer and easier in a changing room, because the barriers disappear horizontal ellipsis ' a case study of masculinity ideals, language and social status amongst Swedish ice hockey playersIn: European Journal for Sport and Society, ISSN 1613-8171Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Previous research has identified sports-related risk factors that can cause acts of violence outside the sporting milieu. The purpose of this case study is to examine the ideals, language and social status of male ice hockey players and determine whether and how they affect their views of sexuality, aggressiveness and actions outside the ice hockey milieu. The method and material are based on a qualitative content analysis of interviews with six senior ice hockey players in Sweden. Research on masculinity and violence theoretically inspires the study. The findings show that expectations and norms can create increased status in a team and at the same time can also make it difficult for players to fully follow their own values and inner guides. In other words, players can be themselves, yet sometimes have to toe the line and follow the group (even if they do not always want to). Another finding is the dilemma of silence and the difficulties that players face in setting limits for team-mates who, for example, joke in a diminishing and inappropriate way. The article ends with a discussion about the challenges that these results entail regarding progressive (violence-preventative) work within ice hockey at the individual and structural levels.

  • 2.
    Carlman, Peter
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Health Sciences (from 2013).
    Augustsson, Christian
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Health Sciences (from 2013).
    It’s like half-sport, maybe even a bit more than half-sport: Children’s experience of a Sport for All Programme in School2016In: European Journal for Sport and Society, ISSN 1613-8171, Vol. 13, no 2, p. 97-110Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this article we explore children’s experiences of a Sport for All Programme (SAP) in school. The purpose of the ‘Sport for All’ policy is to give children an opportunity to try different sports, with a focus on play and motor learning rather than organized competition. In this study, we approach children as active agents in constructing the SAP practice in line with the theoretical standpoint that children are competent social actors with agency. The study is based on repeated focus group interviews with 15 ten-year-old children (9 girls, 6 boys) participating in a SAP in the western part of Sweden. The children perceived the SAP as sessions with less emphasis on performance and without organized competitions; it was described as a ‘low threshold’ activity. However, the result showed that the SAP activity was not free from performance-oriented principles. The Sport for All pedagogy needs to consider and handle the consequences of competition principles, especially if the participating children and leaders have a performance ethos.

  • 3.
    Johansson, Susanne
    et al.
    Gymnastik- och idrottshögskolan, Stockholm.
    Lundqvist, Carolina
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Health Sciences (from 2013).
    Sexual harassment and abuse in coach-athlete relationships in Sweden2017In: European Journal for Sport and Society, ISSN 1613-8171, Vol. 14, no 2, p. 117-137Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Sexual harassment and abuse (SHA) can have a profound negative impact, but research on SHA in sport is scarce and studies of SHA in Swedish sport are absent. This study explores (a) self-reported prevalence of SHA perpetrated by coaches among male and female Swedish athletes, and (b) descriptive statistics for coach-athlete relationship factors and the association between these relationship factors and reported SHA. Current and former Swedish club sport athletes (n = 477) aged 25 participated in the survey. Athletes reported 5.5% prevalence of coach SHA, of which inappropriate, unpleasant, or offensive physical contact were most common. No significant differences of SHA frequency were displayed across gender, sport performance levels, or individual/team sports. A majority of athletes (55-95%) reported trust, closeness, substantial coach influence over sport performance, and instructional physical contact as main coach-athlete relationship factors. A minority (13-39%) reported dependency, substantial coach influence over personal-life, non-instructional physical contact, sexualized comments and jokes, and flirting. Prevalence of coach-athlete friendships, athlete attraction to coaches, and coaches' instructional physical contact differed significantly between male and female athletes. Closeness and athlete attraction to coaches were negatively related, and coaches' non-instructional physical contact and flirting were positively related to reported SHA. Multi-causality and ambiguity of coach-athlete relationship factors are discussed.

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