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  • 1.
    Alavian-Ghavanini, Ali
    et al.
    Karolinska Institutet.
    Lin, Ping-I
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Health Sciences (from 2013).
    Lind, P. Monica
    Uppsala University.
    Rimfors, Sabina Risen
    Karolinska Institutet.
    Lejonklou, Margareta Halin
    Uppsala University.
    Dunder, Linda
    Uppsala University.
    Tang, Mandy
    Karolinska Institutet.
    Lindh, Christian
    Lund University.
    Bornehag, Carl-Gustaf
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Health Sciences (from 2013). Icahn School of Medicine Mt Sinai, New York, USA.
    Rueegg, Joelle
    Karolinska Institutet.
    Prenatal Bisphenol A Exposure is Linked to Epigenetic Changes in Glutamate Receptor Subunit Gene Grin2b in Female Rats and Humans2018In: Scientific Reports, ISSN 2045-2322, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 8, article id 11315Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Bisphenol A (BPA) exposure has been linked to neurodevelopmental disorders and to effects on epigenetic regulation, such as DNA methylation, at genes involved in brain function. High doses of BPA have been shown to change expression and regulation of one such gene, Grin2b, in mice. Yet, if such changes occur at relevant doses in animals and humans has not been addressed. We investigated if low-dose developmental BPA exposure affects DNA methylation and expression of Grin2b in brains of adult rats. Furthermore, we assessed associations between prenatal BPA exposure and Grin2b methylation in 7-year old children. We found that Grin2b mRNA expression was increased and DNA methylation decreased in female, but not in male rats. In humans, prenatal BPA exposure was associated with increased methylation levels in girls. Additionally, Iow APGAR scores, a predictor for increased risk for neurodevelopmental diseases, were associated with higher Grin2b methylation levels in girls. Thus, we could link developmental BPA exposure and Iow APGAR scores to changes in the epigenetic regulation of Grin2b, a gene important for neuronal function, in a sexual dimorphic fashion. Discrepancies in exact locations and directions of the DNA methylation change might reflect differences between species, analysed tissues, exposure level and/or timing.

  • 2.
    Amruth, C.
    et al.
    Lodz University of Technology, Poland.
    Szymanski, Marek Zdzislaw
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Engineering and Chemical Sciences (from 2013). Örebro University.
    Luszczynska, Beata
    Lodz University of Technology, Poland.
    Ulanski, Jacek
    Lodz University of Technology, Poland.
    Inkjet printing of super yellow: Ink formulation, film optimization, OLEDs fabrication, and transient electroluminescence2019In: Scientific Reports, ISSN 2045-2322, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 9, p. 1-10, article id 8493Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Inkjet printing technique allows manufacturing low cost organic light emitting diodes (OLEDs) in ambient conditions. The above approach enables upscaling of the OLEDs fabrication process which, as a result, would become faster than conventionally used vacuum based processing techniques. In this work, we use the inkjet printing technique to investigate the formation of thin active layers of well-known light emitting polymer material: Super Yellow (poly(para-phenylene vinylene) copolymer). We develop the formulation of Super Yellow ink, containing non-chlorinated solvents and allowing stable jetting. Optimization of ink composition and printing resolution were performed, until good quality films suitable for OLEDs were obtained. Fabricated OLEDs have shown a remarkable characteristics of performance, similar to the OLEDs fabricated by means of spin coating technique. We checked that, the values of mobility of the charge carriers in the printed films, measured by transient electroluminescence, are similar to the values of mobility measured in spin coated films. Our contribution provides a complete framework for inkjet printing of high quality Super Yellow films for OLEDs. The description of this method can be used to obtain efficient printed OLEDs both in academic and in industrial settings.

  • 3.
    Balk, Lennart
    et al.
    Stockholm Univ, Dept Environm Sci & Analyt Chem ACES, SE-10691 Stockholm, Sweden.
    Hagerroth, Per-Ake
    Stockholm Univ, Dept Environm Sci & Analyt Chem ACES, SE-10691 Stockholm, Sweden.
    Gustavsson, Hanna
    Stockholm Univ, Dept Environm Sci & Analyt Chem ACES, SE-10691 Stockholm, Sweden.
    Sigg, Lisa
    Stockholm Univ, Dept Environm Sci & Analyt Chem ACES, SE-10691 Stockholm, Sweden.
    Åkerman, Gun
    Stockholm Univ, Dept Environm Sci & Analyt Chem ACES, SE-10691 Stockholm, Sweden.
    Ruiz Munoz, Yolanda
    Univ Vigo, Dept Biochem, Genet & Immunol, Lagoas Marcosende, ES-36310 Vigo, Spain.
    Honeyfield, Dale C.
    Leetown Sci Ctr, No Appalachian Res Lab, S Geol Survey USGS, Wellsboro, PA 16901 USA.
    Tjärnlund, Ulla
    Stockholm Univ, Dept Environm Sci & Analyt Chem ACES, SE-10691 Stockholm, Sweden.
    Oliveira, Kenneth
    Univ Massachusetts Dartmouth, Dept Biol, Dartmouth, MA 02747 USA.
    Strom, Karin
    Stockholm Univ, Dept Environm Sci & Analyt Chem ACES, SE-10691 Stockholm, Sweden.;Karolinska Inst, Dept Med Solna & Ctr Mol Med, SE-17176 Stockholm, Sweden.
    McCormick, Stephen D.
    Leetown Sci Ctr, Conte Anadromous Fish Res Lab, S Geol Survey USGS, Turners Falls, MA 01376 USA.
    Karlsson, Simon
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Environmental and Life Sciences (from 2013). Swedish Univ Agr Sci SLU, Inst Freshwater Res, Dept Aquat Resources, SE-17893 Drottningholm, Sweden..
    Ström, Marika
    Stockholm Univ, Dept Environm Sci & Analyt Chem ACES, SE-10691 Stockholm, Sweden..
    van Manen, Mathijs
    Stockholm Univ, Dept Environm Sci & Analyt Chem ACES, SE-10691 Stockholm, Sweden.;Univ Utrecht, Inst Risk Assessment Sci IRAS, NL-3508 TD Utrecht, Netherlands..
    Berg, Anna-Lena
    Med Prod Agcy, Box 26, SE-75103 Uppsala, Sweden..
    Halldorsson, Halldor P.
    Univ Icelands Res Ctr Sudurnes, IS-245 Sandgerdi, Iceland..
    Strömquist, Jennie
    Swedish Univ Agr Sci SLU, Inst Freshwater Res, Dept Aquat Resources, SE-17893 Drottningholm, Sweden..
    Collier, Tracy K.
    NW Fisheries Sci Ctr, NOAA Fisheries, Seattle, WA 98112 USA..
    Börjeson, Hans
    Swedish Univ Agr Sci SLU, Fisheries Res Stn, 13Department Aquat Resources, Brobacken, SE-81494 lvkarleby, Sweden..
    Morner, Torsten
    Natl Vet Inst SVA, Dept Dis Control & Epidemiol, SE-75189 Uppsala, Sweden..
    Hansson, Tomas
    Stockholm Univ, Dept Environm Sci & Analyt Chem ACES, SE-10691 Stockholm, Sweden..
    Widespread episodic thiamine deficiency in Northern Hemisphere wildlife2016In: Scientific Reports, ISSN 2045-2322, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 6, article id 38821Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Many wildlife populations are declining at rates higher than can be explained by known threats to biodiversity. Recently, thiamine (vitamin B-1) deficiency has emerged as a possible contributing cause. Here, thiamine status was systematically investigated in three animal classes: bivalves, ray-finned fishes, and birds. Thiamine diphosphate is required as a cofactor in at least five life-sustaining enzymes that are required for basic cellular metabolism. Analysis of different phosphorylated forms of thiamine, as well as of activities and amount of holoenzyme and apoenzyme forms of thiaminedependent enzymes, revealed episodically occurring thiamine deficiency in all three animal classes. These biochemical effects were also linked to secondary effects on growth, condition, liver size, blood chemistry and composition, histopathology, swimming behaviour and endurance, parasite infestation, and reproduction. It is unlikely that the thiamine deficiency is caused by impaired phosphorylation within the cells. Rather, the results point towards insufficient amounts of thiamine in the food. By investigating a large geographic area, by extending the focus from lethal to sublethal thiamine deficiency, and by linking biochemical alterations to secondary effects, we demonstrate that the problem of thiamine deficiency is considerably more widespread and severe than previously reported.

  • 4.
    Bowes, Rachel E.
    et al.
    Kansas Biological Survey and Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, University of Kansas, USA.
    Thorp, James H.
    Kansas Biological Survey and Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, University of Kansas, USA.
    Reuman, Daniel C.
    Kansas Biological Survey and Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, University of Kansas, USA; Laboratory of Populations, Rockefeller University, USA.
    Multidimensional metrics of niche space for use with diverse analytical techniques2017In: Scientific Reports, ISSN 2045-2322, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 7, p. 1-11, article id 41599Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Multidimensional data are integral to many community-ecological studies and come in various forms, such as stable isotopes, compound specific analyses (e.g., amino acids and fatty acids), and both biodiversity and life history traits. Scientists employing such data often lack standardized metrics to evaluate communities in niche space where more than 2 dimensions are involved. To alleviate this problem, we developed a graphing and analytical approach for use with more than two variables, based on previously established stable isotope bi-plot metrics. We introduce here our community metrics as R scripts. By extending the original metrics to multiple dimensions, we created n-dimensional plots and metrics to characterize any set of quantitative measurements of a community. We demonstrate the utility of these metrics using stable isotope data; however, the approaches are applicable to many types of data. The resulting metrics provide more and better information compared to traditional analytic frameworks. The approach can be applied in many branches of community ecology, and it offers accessible metrics to quantitatively analyze the structure of communities across ecosystems and through time.

  • 5.
    Hulthén, Kaj
    et al.
    Lunds universitet.
    Chapman, Ben
    University of Manchester.
    Nilsson, Per Anders
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Environmental and Life Sciences (from 2013). Lunds universitet.
    Hansson, Lars-Anders
    Lunds universitet.
    Skov, Christian
    Technical University of Denmark (DTU).
    Brodersen, Jakob
    EAWAG Swiss Federal Institute of Aquatic Science and Technology.
    Vimterstare, Jerker
    Lunds universitet.
    Brönmark, Christer
    Lunds universitet.
    A predation cost to bold fish in the wild2017In: Scientific Reports, ISSN 2045-2322, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 7, article id 1239Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 6.
    Liangsupree, Thanaporn
    et al.
    University Helsinki, Finland.
    Multia, Evgen
    University Helsinki, Finland.
    Metso, Jari
    Biomedicum 2U, Finland.
    Jauhiainen, Matti
    Biomedicum 2U, Finland.
    Forssén, Patrik
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Engineering and Chemical Sciences (from 2013).
    Fornstedt, Torgny
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Engineering and Chemical Sciences (from 2013).
    Oorni, Katariina
    Wihuri Research Institute, Finland.
    Podgornik, Ales
    University Ljubljana, Slovenia.
    Riekkola, Marja-Liisa
    University Helsinki, Finland.
    Rapid affinity chromatographic isolation method for LDL in human plasma by immobilized chondroitin-6-sulfate and anti-apoB-100 antibody monolithic disks in tandem2019In: Scientific Reports, ISSN 2045-2322, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 9, article id 11235Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Low-density lipoprotein (LDL) is considered the major risk factor for the development of atherosclerotic cardiovascular diseases (ASCVDs). A novel and rapid method for the isolation of LDL from human plasma was developed utilising affinity chromatography with monolithic stationary supports. The isolation method consisted of two polymeric monolithic disk columns, one immobilized with chondroitin-6-sulfate (C6S) and the other with apolipoprotein B-100 monoclonal antibody (anti-apoB-100 mAb). The first disk with C6S was targeted to remove chylomicrons, very-low-density lipoprotein (VLDL) particles, and their remnants including intermediate-density lipoprotein (IDL) particles, thus allowing the remaining major lipoprotein species, i.e. LDL, lipoprotein(a) (Lp(a)), and high-density lipoprotein (HDL) to flow to the anti-apoB-100 disk. The second disk captured LDL particles via the anti-apoB-100 mAb attached on the disk surface in a highly specific manner, permitting the selective LDL isolation. The success of LDL isolation was confirmed by different techniques including quartz crystal microbalance. In addition, the method developed gave comparable results with ultracentrifugation, conventionally used as a standard method. The reliable results achieved together with a short isolation time (less than 30 min) suggest the method to be suitable for clinically relevant LDL functional assays.

  • 7.
    Lin, Ping-I
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Health Sciences (from 2013).
    Shu, Huan
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Health Sciences (from 2013).
    Mersha, Tesfaye B.
    University of Cincinnati, USA.
    Comparing DNA methylation profiles across different tissues associated with the diagnosis of pediatric asthma2020In: Scientific Reports, ISSN 2045-2322, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 10, no 1, article id 151Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    DNA methylation (DNAm) profiles in central airway epithelial cells (AECs) may play a key role in pathological processes in asthma. The goal of the current study is to compare the diagnostic performance of DNAm markers across three tissues: AECs, nasal epithelial cells (NECs), and peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs). Additionally, we focused on the results using the machine learning algorithm in the context of multi-locus effects to evaluate the diagnostic performance of the optimal subset of CpG sites. We obtained 74 subjects with asthma and 41 controls from AECs, 15 subjects with asthma and 14 controls from NECs, 697 subjects with asthma and 97 controls from PBMCs. Epigenome-wide DNA methylation levels in AECs, NECs and PBMCs were measured using the Infinium Human Methylation 450K BeadChip. Overlap analysis across the three different sample sources at the locus and pathway levels were studied to investigate shared or unique pathophysiological processes of asthma across tissues. Using the top 100 asthma-associated methylation markers as classifiers from each dataset, we found that both AEC- and NEC-based DNAm signatures exerted a lower classification error than the PBMC-based DNAm markers (p-value = 0.0002). The area-under-the-curve (AUC) analysis based on out-of-bag errors using the random forest classification algorithm revealed that PBMC-, NEC-, and AEC-based methylation data yielded 31 loci (AUC: 0.87), 8 loci (AUC: 0.99), and 4 loci (AUC: 0.97) from each optimal subset of tissue-specific markers, respectively. We also discovered the locus-locus interaction of DNAm levels of the CDH6 gene and RAPGEF3 gene might interact with each other to jointly predict the risk of asthma - which suggests the pivotal role of cell-cell junction in the pathological changes of asthma. Both AECs and NECs might provide better diagnostic accuracy and efficacy levels than PBMCs. Further research is warranted to evaluate how these tissue-specific DNAm markers classify and predict asthma risk.

  • 8.
    Ma, Ping
    et al.
    China.
    Liu, Xudong
    China.
    Wu, Jiliang
    China.
    Yan, Biao
    China.
    Zhang, Yuchao
    China.
    Lu, Yu
    Wu, Yang
    Liu, Chao
    China.
    Guo, Junhui
    China.
    Nanberg, Eewa
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Health Sciences.
    Bornehag, Carl Gustaf
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Health Sciences.
    Yang, Xu
    Cognitive deficits and anxiety induced by diisononyl phthalate in mice and the neuroprotective effects of melatonin2015In: Scientific Reports, ISSN 2045-2322, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 5, article id 14676Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Diisononyl phthalate (DINP) is a plasticizer that is frequently used as a substitute for other plasticizers whose use is prohibited in certain products. In vivo studies on the neurotoxicity of DINP are however, limited. This work aims to investigate whether DINP causes neurobehavioral changes in mice and to provide useful advice on preventing the occurrence of these adverse effects. Behavioral analysis showed that oral administration of 20 or 200â mg/kg/day DINP led to mouse cognitive deficits and anxiety. Brain histopathological observations, immunohistochemistry assays (cysteine-aspartic acid protease 3 [caspase-3], glial fibrillary acidic protein [GFAP]), oxidative stress assessments (reactive oxygen species [ROS], glutathione [GSH], superoxide dismutase [SOD] activities, 8-hydroxy-2-deoxyguanosine [8-OH-dG] and DNA-protein crosslinks [DPC]), and assessment of inflammation (tumor necrosis factor alpha [TNF-Crossed D sign°[ and interleukin-1 beta [IL-1β]) of mouse brains showed that there were histopathological alterations in the brain and increased levels of oxidative stress, and inflammation for these same groups. However, some of these effects were blocked by administration of melatonin (50â mg/kg/day). Down-regulation of oxidative stress was proposed to explain the neuroprotective effects of melatonin. The data suggests that DINP could cause cognitive deficits and anxiety in mice, and that melatonin could be used to avoid these adverse effects.

  • 9.
    Opitz, Andreas
    et al.
    Humboldt Univ, Inst Phys, D-10099 Berlin, Germany.;Humboldt Univ, IRIS Adlershof, D-10099 Berlin, Germany..
    Wilke, Andreas
    Humboldt Univ, Inst Phys, D-10099 Berlin, Germany.;Humboldt Univ, IRIS Adlershof, D-10099 Berlin, Germany..
    Amsalem, Patrick
    Humboldt Univ, Inst Phys, D-10099 Berlin, Germany.;Humboldt Univ, IRIS Adlershof, D-10099 Berlin, Germany..
    Oehzelt, Martin
    Humboldt Univ, Inst Phys, D-10099 Berlin, Germany.;Humboldt Univ, IRIS Adlershof, D-10099 Berlin, Germany.;Helmholtz Zentrum Berlin Mat & Energie GmbH, Bereich Erneuerbare Energien, Berlin, Germany..
    Blum, Ralf-Peter
    Humboldt Univ, Inst Phys, D-10099 Berlin, Germany.;Humboldt Univ, IRIS Adlershof, D-10099 Berlin, Germany..
    Rabe, Juergen P.
    Humboldt Univ, Inst Phys, D-10099 Berlin, Germany.;Humboldt Univ, IRIS Adlershof, D-10099 Berlin, Germany..
    Mizokuro, Toshiko
    Natl Inst Adv Ind Sci & Technol, Osaka, Japan..
    Hoermann, Ulrich
    Univ Augsburg, Inst Phys, D-86159 Augsburg, Germany..
    Hansson, Rickard
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Engineering and Physics (from 2013).
    Moons, Ellen
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Engineering and Physics (from 2013).
    Koch, Norbert
    Humboldt Univ, Inst Phys, D-10099 Berlin, Germany.;Humboldt Univ, IRIS Adlershof, D-10099 Berlin, Germany.;Helmholtz Zentrum Berlin Mat & Energie GmbH, Bereich Erneuerbare Energien, Berlin, Germany..
    Organic heterojunctions: Contact-induced molecular reorientation, interface states, and charge redistribution2016In: Scientific Reports, ISSN 2045-2322, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 6, article id 21291Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We reveal the rather complex interplay of contact-induced re-orientation and interfacial electronic structure-in the presence of Fermi-level pinning-at prototypical molecular heterojunctions comprising copper phthalocyanine (H16CuPc) and its perfluorinated analogue (F16CuPc), by employing ultraviolet photoelectron and X-ray absorption spectroscopy. For both layer sequences, we find that Fermi-level (E-F) pinning of the first layer on the conductive polymer substrate modifies the work function encountered by the second layer such that it also becomes E-F-pinned, however, at the interface towards the first molecular layer. This results in a charge transfer accompanied by a sheet charge density at the organic/organic interface. While molecules in the bulk of the films exhibit upright orientation, contact formation at the heterojunction results in an interfacial bilayer with lying and co-facial orientation. This interfacial layer is not EF-pinned, but provides for an additional density of states at the interface that is not present in the bulk. With reliable knowledge of the organic heterojunction's electronic structure we can explain the poor performance of these in photovoltaic cells as well as their valuable function as charge generation layer in electronic devices.

  • 10.
    Repouskou, Anastasia
    et al.
    National and Kapodistrian University of Athens (NKUA), Greece..
    Panagiotidou, Emily
    National and Kapodistrian University of Athens (NKUA), Greece; School of Health Sciences, NKUA, Greece..
    Panagopoulou, Lydia
    National and Kapodistrian University of Athens (NKUA), Greece..
    Bisting, Pernilla Larsdotter
    Karolinska Institutet, Sweden..
    Tuck, Astrud R.
    Karolinska Institutet, Sweden..
    Sjödin, Marcus O. D.
    Karolinska Institutet, Sweden..
    Lindberg, Johan
    Karolinska Institutet, Sweden..
    Bozas, Evangelos
    School of Health Sciences, Greece..
    Rueegg, Joelle
    Karolinska Institutet, Sweden..
    Gennings, Chris
    Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, USA..
    Bornehag, Carl-Gustaf
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Health Sciences (from 2013).
    Damdimopoulou, Pauliina
    Karolinska Institutet, Sweden..
    Stamatakis, Antonios
    School of Health Sciences, Greece..
    Kitraki, Efthymia
    National and Kapodistrian University of Athens (NKUA), Greece..
    Gestational exposure to an epidemiologically defined mixture of phthalates leads to gonadal dysfunction in mouse offspring of both sexes.2019In: Scientific Reports, ISSN 2045-2322, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 9, no 1, p. 1-17, article id 6424Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The increasing concern for the reproductive toxicity of abundantly used phthalates requires reliable tools for exposure risk assessment to mixtures of chemicals, based on real life human exposure and disorder-associated epidemiological evidence. We herein used a mixture of four phthalate monoesters (33% mono-butyl phthalate, 16% mono-benzyl phthalate, 21% mono-ethyl hexyl phthalate, and 30% mono-isononyl phthalate), detected in 1st trimester urine of 194 pregnant women and identified as bad actors for a shorter anogenita I distance (AGD) in their baby boys. Mice were treated with 0, 0.26, 2.6 and 13 mg/kg/d of the mixture, corresponding to 0x, 10x, 100x, 500x levels detected in the pregnant women. Adverse outcomes detected in the reproductive system of the offspring in pre-puberty and adulthood included reduced AGD index and gonadal weight, changes in gonadal histology and altered expression of key regulators of gonadal growth and steroidogenesis. Most aberrations were apparent in both sexes, though more pronounced in males, and exhibited a non-monotonic pattern. The phthalate mixture directly affected expression of steroidogenesis as demonstrated in a relevant in vitro model. The detected adversities at exposures close to the levels detected in pregnant women, raise concern on the existing safety limits for early-life human exposures and emphasizes the need for re-evaluation of the exposure risk.

  • 11.
    Wikström, Sverre
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Health Sciences (from 2013). Örebro universitet.
    Lindh, Christian H
    Lunds universitet.
    Shu, Huan
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Health Sciences (from 2013). Stockholms universitet.
    Bornehag, Carl-Gustaf
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Health Sciences (from 2013). Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, NY, United States.
    Early pregnancy serum levels of perfluoroalkyl substances and risk of preeclampsia in Swedish women.2019In: Scientific Reports, ISSN 2045-2322, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 9, no 1, p. 1-7, article id 9179Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Preeclampsia is a major cause of maternal and fetal morbidity. Emerging research shows an association with environmental exposures. The present aim was to investigate associations between early pregnancy serum levels of perfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS) and preeclampsia. Within the Swedish SELMA study, eight PFAS were measured at median 10 gestational weeks and cases of preeclampsia were postnatally identified from registers. Associations between individual PFAS and preeclampsia were assessed, adjusting for parity, age, weight and smoking. Out of 1,773 women in the study group, 64 (3.6%), developed preeclampsia. A doubling of PFOS and PFNA exposure, corresponding to an inter-quartile increase, was associated with an increased risk for preeclampsia of about 38-53% respectively. Serum PFOS within the highest quartile was associated with an odds ratio of 2.68 (CI 95%: 1.17-6.12), equal to the increased risk associated with nulliparity, when compared to exposure in the first quartile. The same associations were identified, although with higher risk estimates, in analyses restricted to nulliparous women. For other PFAS, there were no associations. In conclusion and consistent with limited previous research only on PFOS, increasing serum levels of PFOS and PFNA during early pregnancy were associated with a clinically relevant risk of preeclampsia, adjusting for established confounders.

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