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  • 1.
    Holmgren Troy, Maria
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Department of Language, Literature and Intercultural Studies (from 2013).
    Chronotopes in Harriet Jacobs's Incidents in the Life of a Slave Girl2016In: African American Review, ISSN 1062-4783, E-ISSN 1945-6182, Vol. 49, no 1, p. 19-34Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article employs Bakhtin’s concept of the chronotope to examine the interrelatedness of different places, temporalities, characterization, and values in Harriet Jacobs’s Incidents in the Life of a Slave Girl. Focusing on the complex interactions of four chronotopes—Dr. Flint’s house, the provincial town, the grandmother’s house, and the garret—the article yields a deeper understanding of how Jacobs critiques antebellum American society and, at the same time, constructs the grandmother’s house as chronotope as a site of negotiation with her most obvious historical addressee: the Northern white middle-class woman.

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