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  • 1.
    Chapman, B
    et al.
    Lund University.
    Hulthén, K
    Brodersen, J
    Lund University.
    Nilsson, P. Anders
    Lund University.
    Skov, C
    Technical University Denmark DTU, Denmark.
    Hansson, L-A
    Lund University.
    Brönmark, C
    Lund University.
    Partial migration in fishes: causes and consequences2012Inngår i: Journal of Fish Biology, ISSN 0022-1112, E-ISSN 1095-8649, Vol. 81, s. 456-478Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
  • 2.
    Chapman, B
    et al.
    Lund University.
    Skov, C
    NTU, Denmark.
    Hulthén, K
    Lund University.
    Brodersen, J
    Lund University.
    Nilsson, P. Anders
    Lund University.
    Hansson, L-A
    Lund University.
    Brönmark, C
    Lund University.
    Partial migration in fishes: definitions, methodologies and taxonomic distribution2012Inngår i: Journal of Fish Biology, ISSN 0022-1112, E-ISSN 1095-8649, Vol. 81, nr 2, s. 479-499Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
  • 3. Forseth, Torbjörn
    et al.
    Larsson, Stefan
    Jensen, Arne J.
    Jonsson, Bror
    Norsk institutt for naturforskning (NINA).
    Naslund, Ingemar
    Berglund, Ingemar
    Thermal growth performance of juvenile brown trout Salmo trutta: no support for thermal adaptation hypotheses2009Inngår i: Journal of Fish Biology, ISSN 0022-1112, E-ISSN 1095-8649, Vol. 74, nr 1, s. 133-149Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Using thermal growth data from eight populations of anadromous and lake-feeding brown trout Salmo trutta, hypotheses of adaptation to local optima and countergradient variation in growth were tested. The adaptation to local optima hypothesis suggests that natural selection can shift optimal performance temperatures to match the prevailing temperature in a new or changed thermal niche. In contradiction, the countergradient variation hypothesis suggests that populations from hostile environments perform better than conspecifics from benign environments at all temperatures. In this study, growth capacity varied between populations but there was no significant correlation between any of the estimated thermal performance parameters (e.g. lower and upper thermal growth limits, optimal temperature for growth and maximum growth capacity) and natural climatic conditions among populations. Hence, S. trutta growth response to temperature lends no support for either of the two suggested thermal adaptation hypotheses. Instead, growth capacity among populations tended to correlate positively with female size at maturity.

  • 4.
    Gordon, T. A. C.
    et al.
    Biosciences, University of Exeter, U.K..
    Harding, H. R.
    School of Biological Sciences, University of Bristol, U.K..
    Clever, F. K.
    School of Science and the Environment, John Dalton Building, Manchester Metropolitan University, U.K..
    Davidson, I. K.
    Biosciences, University of Exeter, U.K..
    Davison, W.
    Biosciences, University of Exeter, U.K..
    Montgomery, D. W.
    Biosciences, University of Exeter, U.K..
    Weatherhead, R. C.
    Institute of Biological, Environmental and Rural Sciences (IBERS), Aberystwyth University, U.K..
    Windsor, F. M.
    School of Biosciences, Cardiff University, U.K..
    Armstrong, J. D.
    Marine Scotland Science, Freshwater Fisheries Laboratory, U.K..
    Bardonnet, A.
    ECOBIOP, UMR 1224, INRA, Univ. Pau & Pays Adour, France.
    Bergman, Eva
    Karlstads universitet, Fakulteten för hälsa, natur- och teknikvetenskap (from 2013), Institutionen för miljö- och livsvetenskaper.
    Britton, J. R.
    Department of Life and Environmental Sciences, Faculty of Science and Technology, Bournemouth University, U.K..
    Cote, I. M.
    Department of Biological Sciences, Simon Fraser University, Canada.
    D'agostino, D.
    School of Life Sciences, University of Nottingham, U.K..
    Greenberg, Larry
    Karlstads universitet, Fakulteten för hälsa, natur- och teknikvetenskap (from 2013), Institutionen för miljö- och livsvetenskaper.
    Harborne, A. R.
    Department of Biological Sciences, Florida International University, U.S.A..
    Kahilainen, K. K.
    Faculty of Biosciences, Fisheries and Economics, The Norwegian College of Fishery Science, UiT The Arctic University of Norway, Norway.
    Metcalfe, N. B.
    Institute of Biodiversity, Animal Health and Comparative Medicine, MVLS, University of Glasgow, U.K..
    Mills, S. C.
    CRIOBE, EPHE PSL Research University, French Polynesia Laboratoire d'Excellence “CORAIL”, France.
    Milner, N. J.
    APEM Ltd, School of Biological Sciences, U.K..
    Mittermayer, F. H.
    Evolutionary Ecology of Marine Fishes, GEOMAR Helmholtz Centre for Ocean Research, Germany.
    Montorio, L.
    ESE, Ecology and Ecosystem Health, Agrocampus Ouest, France.
    Nedelec, S. L.
    Biosciences, University of Exeter, U.K..
    Prokkola, J. M.
    Department of Environmental and Biological Sciences, University of Eastern Finland, Finland.
    Rutterford, L. A.
    Biosciences, University of Exeter, U.K..
    Salvanes, A. G. V.
    Department of Biological Sciences, University of Bergen, Norway.
    Simpson, S. D.
    Biosciences, University of Exeter, U.K..
    Vainikka, A.
    Department of Environmental and Biological Sciences, University of Eastern Finland, Finland.
    Pinnegar, J. K.
    Centre for Environment, Fisheries and Aquaculture Science, Lowestoft Laboratory, U.K..
    Santos, E. M.
    Biosciences, University of Exeter, U.K..
    Fishes in a changing world: learning from the past to promote sustainability of fish populations2018Inngår i: Journal of Fish Biology, ISSN 0022-1112, E-ISSN 1095-8649, Vol. 92, nr 3, s. 804-827Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Populations of fishes provide valuable services for billions of people, but face diverse and interacting threats that jeopardize their sustainability. Human population growth and intensifying resource use for food, water, energy and goods are compromising fish populations through a variety of mechanisms, including overfishing, habitat degradation and declines in water quality. The important challenges raised by these issues have been recognized and have led to considerable advances over past decades in managing and mitigating threats to fishes worldwide. In this review, we identify the major threats faced by fish populations alongside recent advances that are helping to address these issues. There are very significant efforts worldwide directed towards ensuring a sustainable future for the world's fishes and fisheries and those who rely on them. Although considerable challenges remain, by drawing attention to successful mitigation of threats to fish and fisheries we hope to provide the encouragement and direction that will allow these challenges to be overcome in the future.

    Fulltekst (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 5.
    Guenard, G.
    et al.
    Département de Sciences Biologiques, Université de Montréal, Canada.
    Boisclair, D.
    De´partement de sciences biologiques, Universite´ de Montre´al, Canada.
    Ugedal, O.
    Norwegian Institute for Nature Research, Trondheim, Norway.
    Forseth, T.
    Norwegian Institute for Nature Research, Trondheim, Norway.
    Jonsson, Bror
    Norwegian Institute for Nature Research, Norway.
    Fleming, I. A.
    Memorial University of Newfoundland .
    An experimental study of the multiple effects of brown trout Salmo trutta on the bioenergetics of two Arctic charr Salvelinus alpinus morphs2012Inngår i: Journal of Fish Biology, ISSN 0022-1112, E-ISSN 1095-8649, Vol. 81, nr 4, s. 1248-1270Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    This study investigated the importance of competition with brown trout Salmo trutta as a driver of the morphological and behavioural divergence of two morphs of Arctic charr Salvelinus alpinus. The morphs originated from two lakes differing in absence or presence of the competitor. The bioenergetics and behaviour of S. alpinus were quantified in replicate experimental enclosures (mean volume: 150 m(3)) stocked with 15 S. alpinus of one morph or the other and in the absence or presence of nine S. trutta. The presence of S. trutta decreased growth rate, affected food consumption and increased activity costs in S. alpinus, but provided little support for the hypothesis that competition with S. trutta is a major driver of the divergence of the two S. alpinus morphs. Both morphs responded similarly in terms of mean growth and consumption rates per enclosure, but the association between individual morphology and growth rate reversed between allopatric and sympatric enclosures. While the activity patterns of the two morphs were unaffected by the presence of S. trutta, their swimming speed and activity rate differed. Since the profound differences in the structure of the physical habitat of the source lakes provided a more likely explanation for the difference observed among these two morphs than interspecific competition, it is hypothesized that physical habitat may sometimes be a significant driving force of the phenotypic divergence.

  • 6.
    Hulthen, K.
    et al.
    Lund University.
    Chapman, B. B.
    Lund University.
    Nilsson, Per Anders
    Lund University.
    Hansson, L. -A
    Lund University.
    Skov, C.
    Danmark.
    Baktoft, H.
    Danmark.
    Brodersen, J.
    Switzerland.
    Bronmark, C.
    Lund University.
    Sex identification and PIT-tagging: tools and prospects for studying intersexual differences in freshwater fishes2014Inngår i: Journal of Fish Biology, ISSN 0022-1112, E-ISSN 1095-8649, Vol. 84, nr 2, s. 503-512Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
  • 7. Jonsson, Bror
    et al.
    Jonsson, Nina
    A review of the likely effects of climate change on anadromous Atlantic salmon Salmo salar and brown trout Salmo trutta, with particular reference to water temperature and flow2009Inngår i: Journal of Fish Biology, ISSN 0022-1112, E-ISSN 1095-8649, Vol. 75, s. 2381-2447Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    The present paper reviews the effects of water temperature and flow on migrations, embryonic development, hatching, emergence, growth and life-history traits in light of the ongoing climate change with emphasis on anadromous Atlantic salmon Salmo salar and brown trout Salmo trutta. The expected climate change in the Atlantic is for milder and wetter winters, with more precipitation falling as rain and less as snow, decrease in ice-covered periods and frequent periods with extreme weather. Overall, thermal limits for salmonids are species specific. Scope for activity and growth and optimal temperature for growth increase with temperature to an optimal point before constrain by the oxygen content of the water. The optimal temperature for growth decreases with increasing fish size and varies little among populations within species, whereas the growth efficiency may be locally adapted to the temperature conditions of the home stream during the growth season. Indirectly, temperature influences age and size at smolting through its effect on growth. Time of spawning, egg hatching and emergence of the larvae vary with temperature and selective effects on time of first feeding. Traits such as age at first maturity, longevity and fecundity decrease with increasing temperature whilst egg size increases with temperature. Water flow influences the accessibility of rivers for returning adults and speed of both upstream and downstream migration. Extremes in water flow and temperature can decrease recruitment and survival. There is reason to expect a northward movement of the thermal niche of anadromous salmonids with decreased production and population extinction in the southern part of the distribution areas, migrations earlier in the season, later spawning, younger age at smolting and sexual maturity and increased disease susceptibility and mortality. Future research challenges are summarized at the end of the paper.

  • 8.
    Jonsson, Bror
    et al.
    Karlstads universitet, Fakulteten för hälsa, natur- och teknikvetenskap (from 2013). Norwegian Institute for Nature Research, Oslo, Norway.
    Jonsson, Nina
    Norwegian Institute for Nature Research, Oslo, Norway.
    Early environment influences later performance in fishes2014Inngår i: Journal of Fish Biology, ISSN 0022-1112, E-ISSN 1095-8649, Vol. 85, nr 2, s. 155-188Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Conditions fish encounter during embryogenesis and early life history can leave lasting effects not only on morphology, but also on growth rate, life-history and behavioural traits. The ecology of offspring can be affected by conditions experienced by their parents and mother in particular. This review summarizes such early impacts and their ecological influences for a variety of teleost species, but with special reference to salmonids. Growth and adult body size, sex ratio, egg size, lifespan and tendency to migrate can all be affected by early influences. Mechanisms behind such phenotypically plastic impacts are not well known, but epigenetic change appears to be one central mechanism. The thermal regime during development and incubation is particularly important, but also early food consumption and intraspecific density can all be responsible for later life-history variation. For behavioural traits, early experiences with effects on brain, sensory development and cognition appear essential. This may also influence boldness and other social behaviours such as mate choice. At the end of the review, several issues and questions for future studies are given.

  • 9. Jonsson, Bror
    et al.
    Jonsson, Nina
    Migratory timing, marine survival and growth of anadromous brown trout Salmo trutta in the River Imsa, Norway2009Inngår i: Journal of Fish Biology, ISSN 0022-1112, E-ISSN 1095-8649, Vol. 74, nr 3, s. 621-638Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of the paper was to study sea migration, growth and survival of brown trout Salmotrutta of the River Imsa, 1976–2005. The migratory S. trutta were individually tagged and fishleaving or entering the river were monitored daily in traps located near the river mouth. Themean annual duration of the sea sojourn was 6–9 months for first-time migrants moving to seabetween January and June. It was 8–18 months for those migrating to sea between July andDecember. Veteran migrants stayed 12 months or less at sea and most returned to the river inAugust. Early ascending fish stayed the longest in fresh water because most returned to sea inApril to May. The day number of 50% cumulative smolt descent correlated negatively withmean water temperature in February to March and the February North Atlantic Oscillationindex (NAOI). Mean annual sea growth during the first 2 years after smolting was higher for S.trutta spending the winter at sea than those wintering in the River Imsa. First year's sea growthwas lower for S. trutta descending in spring than autumn. For first-time migrants, it correlatednegatively with the February NAOI of the smolt year. Sea survival was higher for spring thanautumn descending first-time migratory S. trutta with a maximum in May (149%). Number ofanadromous S. trutta returning to the river increased linearly with the size of the cohort movingto sea, with no evidence of density-dependent sea mortality. Sea survival of S. trutta smoltsmoving to sea between January and June correlated positively both with the annual number ofAtlantic Salmo salar smolts, the specific growth rate at sea, and time of seaward migration inspring. This is the first study indicating how environmental factors at the time of seawardmigration influence the sea survival of S. trutta.

  • 10.
    Jonsson, Nina
    et al.
    Norwegian Institute for Nature Research, Oslo, Norway.
    Jonsson, Bror
    Norsk institutt for naturforskning (NINA).
    Time and size at seaward migration influence the sea survival of Salmo salar2014Inngår i: Journal of Fish Biology, ISSN 0022-1112, E-ISSN 1095-8649, Vol. 84, nr 5, s. 1457-1473Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Whether time of seaward migration of young Atlantic salmon Salmo salar influences their subsequent survival and growth was investigated in the River Imsa, south-western Norway. Salmo salar were tagged when moving downstream through a trap near the outlet between 1976 and 2010 and recaptured on their adult return. Most descended as smolts in April and May, but some descended during the other months of the year. Annual variation in timing of the smolt migration was significantly correlated with variation in water temperature during spring. Mean total body length of the descending S. salar varied with month of seaward migration. The sea survival of S. salar emigrating from the River Imsa between January and May was 2·8 times higher than for those descending between June and December. The sea survival of the various cohorts decreased with increasing river temperature in April to May, prior to the smolt migration, and decreasing day number when the smolts moved to sea. The size of smolts descending the river between April and May did not affect the survival at sea as much as it affected the survival of migrants descending in any other month of the year. The majority of the downstream migrating S. salar were 2 years old, but proportionally, more 1 year olds moved downstream in the autumn than in the rest of the year. Mean duration between downstream migration of the young and the return migration of the grilse was shortest (12·7 months) for those descending in July and August and longest for those descending in October (21 months). Mean monthly specific growth rate was highest for those migrating downstream between May and July and lowest for those emigrating in September. Based on the present results, it was hypothesized that S. salar emigrating between April and August migrated directly out into the ocean, while those that emigrated between October and March stayed in the estuary until the subsequent spring.

  • 11.
    Jönsson, Mikael
    et al.
    Lund university.
    Hylander, S
    Lund university.
    Ranåker, L
    Lund university.
    Nilsson, P. Anders
    Lund University.
    Brönmark, C
    Lund university.
    Foraging success of juvenile pike Esox lucius depends on visual conditions and prey pigmentation2011Inngår i: Journal of Fish Biology, ISSN 0022-1112, E-ISSN 1095-8649, Vol. 79, s. 290-297Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
  • 12.
    Linlökken, Arne
    et al.
    Hamar Norway.
    Bergman, Eva
    Karlstads universitet, Fakulteten för samhälls- och livsvetenskaper, Avdelningen för biologi.
    Greenberg, Larry
    Karlstads universitet, Fakulteten för samhälls- och livsvetenskaper, Avdelningen för biologi.
    Effect of temperature and roach Rutilus rutilus group size on swimming speed and prey capture rate of perch Perca fluviatilis and R. rutilus2010Inngår i: Journal of Fish Biology, ISSN 0022-1112, E-ISSN 1095-8649, Vol. 76, nr 4, s. 900-912Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Effects of temperature and group size of roach Rutilus rutilus on foraging behaviour of perch Perca fluviatilis and R. rutilus were tested in two laboratory experiments. A temperature experiment with P. fluviatilis and R. rutilus in aquaria (with either one P. fluviatilis or two R. rutilus) was tested at five temperatures: 4, 8, 12, 16 and 20° C, and showed that P. fluviatilis had a lower swimming speed and capture rate than R. rutilus, especially at 4 and 8° C. The effect of group size was tested at four R. rutilus abundances: 0, 2, 4 and 6, all at 16° C, and revealed that swimming speed and capture rate of P. fluviatilis were lowest at the highest R. rutilus abundance, whereas R. rutilus was relatively unaffected. Perca fluviatilis occupied positions closer to the bottom than R. rutilus, especially when feeding, and this tendency was reinforced at the highest roach abundance

  • 13.
    Nilsson, P. Anders
    et al.
    Lund University.
    Baktoft, H
    Lund University.
    Boel, M
    Lund University.
    Meier, K
    Lund University.
    Jacobsen, L
    Lund University.
    Rokkjær, EM
    Lund University.
    Clausen, T
    Lund University.
    Skov, C
    Lund University.
    Visibility conditions and diel period affect small-scale spatio-temporal behaviour of pike Esox lucius L. in the absence of prey and conspecifics2012Inngår i: Journal of Fish Biology, ISSN 0022-1112, E-ISSN 1095-8649, Vol. 80, nr 6, s. 2384-2389Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
  • 14.
    Nilsson, P. Anders
    et al.
    Lund Univ, Dept Biol Aquat Ecol, S-22362 Lund, Sweden.;Karlstad Univ, Dept Environm & Life Sci, River Ecol & Management Res Grp RivEM, Karlstad, Sweden..
    Pettersson, Ivi J.
    Lund Univ, Dept Biol Aquat Ecol, S-22362 Lund, Sweden..
    Tamario, Carl
    Linnaeus Univ, Dept Biol & Environm Sci, EEMiS, Ctr Ecol & Evolut Microbial Syst, Kalmar, Sweden..
    Degerman, Erik
    Swedish Univ Agr Sci, Inst Freshwater Res, Dept Aquat Resources, Orebro, Sweden..
    Elghagen, Jonas
    Elghagen Fiskevard, Astorp, Sweden..
    Watz, Johan
    Karlstad Univ, Dept Environm & Life Sci, River Ecol & Management Res Grp RivEM, Karlstad, Sweden..
    Calles, Olle
    Karlstad Univ, Dept Environm & Life Sci, River Ecol & Management Res Grp RivEM, Karlstad, Sweden..
    Substrate-size choice in European eel (Anguilla anguilla) elvers is not altered by piscivore chemical cuesInngår i: Journal of Fish Biology, ISSN 0022-1112, E-ISSN 1095-8649Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    The European eel Anguilla anguilla Linnaeus 1758 is critically endangered with recruitment estimated at 5-10% of historical levels. Enhancing survival of recruits is pivotal for conservation, and restoration should consider habitat choice of elvers ascending river systems. We experimentally show that newly ascended elvers choose small pebble habitat over finer and larger substrates, regardless of the presence or absence of piscivore chemical cues, indicating no predator-induced change in substrate choice. Enriching habitats with this substrate fraction should enhance eel recruitment as well as biodiversity at large.

  • 15.
    Norrgård, Johnny
    et al.
    Karlstads universitet, Fakulteten för samhälls- och livsvetenskaper, Avdelningen för biologi.
    Bergman, Eva
    Karlstads universitet, Fakulteten för samhälls- och livsvetenskaper, Avdelningen för biologi.
    Schmitz, Monika
    Karlstads universitet, Fakulteten för samhälls- och livsvetenskaper.
    Greenberg, Larry
    Karlstads universitet, Fakulteten för samhälls- och livsvetenskaper, Avdelningen för biologi.
    Effects of feeding regimes and early maturation on migratory behaviour of landlocked hatchery-reared Atlantic salmon Salmo salar smolts2014Inngår i: Journal of Fish Biology, ISSN 0022-1112, E-ISSN 1095-8649, Vol. 85, nr 4, s. 1060-1073Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    The migratory behaviour of hatchery-reared landlocked Atlantic salmon Salmo salar raised under three different feeding regimes was monitored through the lower part of the River Klarälven, Sweden. The smolts were implanted with acoustic transmitters and released into the River Klarälven, 25 km upstream of the outlet in Lake Vänern. Early mature males, which had matured the previous autumn, were also tagged and released. To monitor migration of the fish, acoustic receivers were deployed along the migratory route. The proportion of S. salar that reached Lake Vänern was significantly greater for fish fed fat-reduced feed than for fish given rations with higher fat content, regardless of ration size. Fish from the early mature male group remained in the river to a greater extent than fish from the three feeding regimes. Smolt status (degree of silvering), as visually assessed, did not differ among the feeding regime groups, and moreover, fully-silvered fish, regardless of feeding regime, migrated faster and had a greater migration success than fish with less developed smolt characteristics. Also, successful migrants had a lower condition factor than unsuccessful ones. These results indicate that the migration success of hatchery-reared S. smolts released to the wild can be enhanced by relatively simple changes in feeding regimes and by matching stocking time with smolt development.

  • 16.
    Norrgård, Johnny R
    et al.
    Karlstads universitet, Fakulteten för hälsa, natur- och teknikvetenskap (from 2013), Institutionen för miljö- och livsvetenskaper (from 2013).
    Bergman, Eva
    Karlstads universitet, Fakulteten för hälsa, natur- och teknikvetenskap (from 2013), Institutionen för miljö- och livsvetenskaper (from 2013).
    Greenberg, Larry
    Karlstads universitet, Fakulteten för hälsa, natur- och teknikvetenskap (from 2013), Institutionen för miljö- och livsvetenskaper (from 2013).
    Schmitz, Monika
    Uppsala University.
    Effects of feed quality and quantity on growth, early maturation and smolt development in hatchery-reared landlocked Atlantic salmon Salmo salar2014Inngår i: Journal of Fish Biology, ISSN 0022-1112, E-ISSN 1095-8649, Vol. 85, nr 4, s. 1192-1210Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    The effects of feed quality and quantity on growth, early male parr maturation and development of smolt characteristics were studied in hatchery reared landlocked Atlantic salmon Salmo salar. A 2x2 factorial design was used, with two levels of feed rations and lipid content of the feed. The fish were reared from first feeding until release in May the second year. At the end of the experiment salmon fed high rations, regardless of lipid content, grew the most, whereas salmon fed low lipid feed with low rations grew the least. In addition, fish fed low lipid feed had lower body lipid levels than fish fed high lipid feed. Fish from all treatments showed some reduction in condition factor (CF) and lipid levels during their second spring. Smolt status was evaluated using both physiological and morphological variables. These results, based on Na+, K+-ATPase (NKA) enzyme activity, saltwater tolerance challenges and visual assessments, were consistent with each other, showing that salmon from all treatments except the treatment in which fish were fed low rations with low lipid content, exhibited characteristics associated with smolting at two-years of age. Smolting was mainly affected by feed rations; fish fed higher rations experienced enhanced smolting. Sexually mature male parr from the high ration, high lipid content treatment were also subjected to saltwater challenge tests, and were found to be unable to regulate plasma sodium levels. Low feed rations noticeably reduced the proportion of sexually mature male parr, while there was no difference related to lipid content of feed. Fish fed low rations with low lipid content exhibited the highest degree of severe fin erosion.

  • 17.
    Obregón, C.
    et al.
    Estuaries & Wetlands Conservation Programmes, Conservation Programmes Department, Zoological Society of London, Regents Park, London.
    Lyndon, A. R.
    Centre for Marine Biodiversity and Biotechnology, Institute of Life and Earth Sciences, Heriot-Watt University, John Muir Building, Edinburgh, United Kingdom.
    Barker, J.
    Estuaries & Wetlands Conservation Programmes, Conservation Programmes Department, Zoological Society of London, Regents Park, London, United Kingdo.
    Christiansen, H.
    Laboratory of Biodiversity and Evolutionary Genomics, Department of Biology, KU Leuven.
    Godley, B. J.
    Centre for Ecology and Conservation, Daphne du Maurier Building, College of Life and Environmental Sciences, Department of Biosciences, University of Exeter,.
    Kurland, S.
    Populations genetics, Department of Zoology, Stockholm University, Stockholm.
    Piccolo, John
    Karlstads universitet, Fakulteten för hälsa, natur- och teknikvetenskap (from 2013), Institutionen för miljö- och livsvetenskaper (from 2013).
    Potts, R.
    Biosciences, College of Life and Environmental Sciences, Department of Biosciences, University of Exeter.
    Short, R.
    Department of Life Sciences, Imperial College London, Silwood Park Campus, Buckhurst Road, Ascot, United Kingdom.
    Tebb, A.
    Sussex Inshore Fisheries and Conservation Authority, Shoreham-by-Sea, West Sussex, United Kingdom.
    Mariani, S.
    School of Environment and Life Sciences, University of Salford, Peel Building, Salford, United Kingdom.
    Valuing and understanding fish populations in the Anthropocene: Key questions to address2018Inngår i: Journal of Fish Biology, ISSN 0022-1112, E-ISSN 1095-8649, Vol. 92, nr 3, s. 828-845Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Research on the values of fish populations and fisheries has primarily focused on bio-economic aspects; a more nuanced and multidimensional perspective is mostly neglected. Although a range of social aspects is increasingly being considered in fisheries research, there is still no clear understanding as to how to include these additional values within management policies nor is there a cogent appreciation of the major knowledge gaps that should be tackled by future research. This paper results from a workshop held during the 50th anniversary symposium of the Fisheries Society of the British Isles at the University of Exeter, UK, in July 2017. Here, we aim to highlight the current knowledge gaps on the values of fish populations and fisheries thus directing future research. To this end, we present eight questions that are deeply relevant to understanding the values of fish populations and fisheries. These can be applied to all habitats and fisheries, including freshwater, estuarine and marine.

  • 18.
    Piccolo, John
    Karlstads universitet, Fakulteten för hälsa, natur- och teknikvetenskap (from 2013), Institutionen för miljö- och livsvetenskaper (from 2013).
    Conservation genomics: coming to a salmonid near you2016Inngår i: Journal of Fish Biology, ISSN 0022-1112, E-ISSN 1095-8649, Vol. 89, nr 6, s. 2735-2740Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Using the examples on hereditary and environmental factors affecting salmonid populations, this paper demonstrates that ecologists have long appreciated the importance of local adaptation and intraspecific diversity for salmonid conservation. Conservationists, however, need to embrace the genomics revolution and use new insights to improve salmonid management. At the same time, researchers must be forthcoming with the uses and limitations of genomics, and conservation must move forward in the face of scientific uncertainty.

  • 19.
    van Deurs, M
    et al.
    Lund University; Technical University of Denmark, Denmark.
    Andersson, A
    Lund University.
    Vinterstare, J
    Lund University.
    Didenko, A
    Institute of Fisheries of the National Academy of Agrarian Sciences of Ukraine, Ukraine.
    Persson, A
    Lund University.
    Brönmark, C
    Lund University.
    Nilsson, Per Anders
    Karlstads universitet, Fakulteten för hälsa, natur- och teknikvetenskap (from 2013), Institutionen för miljö- och livsvetenskaper (from 2013). Lund University.
    Using accelerometry to quantify prey attack and handling behaviours in piscivorous pike Esox lucius2017Inngår i: Journal of Fish Biology, ISSN 0022-1112, E-ISSN 1095-8649, Vol. 90, nr 6, s. 2462-2469Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Accelerometer technology was used to evaluate behaviours in the teleost ambush predator pike Esox lucius foraging on crucian carp Carassius carassius. Automated rule-based estimates of prey-size determined handling time were obtained and are compared with video-recorded behaviours. Solutions to tag attachment and the limitations imposed by battery-time and data-logging capacities are evaluated.

  • 20.
    Watz, Johan
    Karlstads universitet, Fakulteten för hälsa, natur- och teknikvetenskap (from 2013), Institutionen för miljö- och livsvetenskaper (from 2013).
    Structural complexity in the hatchery rearing environment affects activity, resting metabolic rate and post‐release behaviour in brown trout Salmo trutta2019Inngår i: Journal of Fish Biology, ISSN 0022-1112, E-ISSN 1095-8649, Vol. 95, nr 2, s. 638-641Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    The effects of structural enrichment in the hatchery rearing environment of brown trout Salmo trutta was linked to post‐release performance. Enrichment resulted in reduced swimming activity scored in an open field test and reduced movement in a natural river after release. Also, enrichment increased resting metabolic rates, which correlated positively with overwinter growth.

  • 21.
    Watz, Johan
    et al.
    Karlstads universitet, Fakulteten för hälsa, natur- och teknikvetenskap (from 2013), Institutionen för miljö- och livsvetenskaper.
    Piccolo, John J.
    Karlstads universitet, Fakulteten för hälsa, natur- och teknikvetenskap (from 2013), Institutionen för miljö- och livsvetenskaper.
    Greenberg, Larry
    Karlstads universitet, Fakulteten för samhälls- och livsvetenskaper, Avdelningen för biologi.
    Bergman, Eva
    Karlstads universitet, Fakulteten för samhälls- och livsvetenskaper, Avdelningen för biologi.
    Temperature-dependent prey capture efficiency and foraging modes of brown trout Salmo trutta2012Inngår i: Journal of Fish Biology, ISSN 0022-1112, E-ISSN 1095-8649, Vol. 81, nr 1, s. 345-350Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Prey capture success and foraging mode were studied in brown trout Salmo trutta at temperatures ranging from 5·7 to 14·0° C. At low temperatures, there was a positive correlation between prey capture success and the proportion of time that the fish spent holding feeding stations. This correlation was not found at temperatures >10° C.

1 - 21 of 21
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