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  • 1.
    Govindarajan, Venkatesh
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Engineering and Chemical Sciences (from 2013).
    Classroom survey to gauge how the three pillars of sustainability are prioritised for the urban water and wastewater system2017In: Vatten, ISSN 0042-2886, Vol. 73, no 1, p. 33-37Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 2.
    Govindarajan, Venkatesh
    Norwegian University for Science & Technology, Norway.
    Environmental systems analysis of urban water systems - limited historical account of published work in scientific journals2015In: Vatten, ISSN 0042-2886, Vol. 71, no 4, p. 209-222Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 3.
    Govindarajan, Venkatesh
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Engineering and Chemical Sciences (from 2013).
    Industrial ecology tools as decision-making aids for sustainable phosphorus recovery: A methodology paper   Industriell-ekologi verktyg som beslutsstöd för hållbar fosfor återvinning:  en metod-artikel2018In: Vatten, ISSN 0042-2886, Vol. 74, no 3, p. 107-121Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    India, being the second largest importer, and the largest consumer of phosphate fertilisers in the world, needs to focus on securing its supplies not merely by providing subsidies to importers but also focusing on recovery and recycling of phosphorus from waste streams. In the process, the country can avail of concomitant benefits like wastewater reclamation and bio-energy generation, and improve the lot of the millions of farmers in the country. In this paper the authors have outlined a methodology based on industrial ecology tools – MFA (SFA), E-LCA, LCC and S-LCA - which they intend to adopt in the near-term to study, analyse and model the status quo and proposed interventions, from a sustainability perspective, which will become indispensable in the not-too-distant future for the country. The literature review which has been segmented on the basis of the application of the different tools to the study and analysis of resource recovery from wastewater, provides insights into what has been done thus far, and prepares the bedrock for a more detailed analysis.  

     

  • 4.
    Govindarajan, Venkatesh
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Engineering and Chemical Sciences (from 2013).
    Recovery of different types of resources from wastewater – A structured review.2018In: Vatten, ISSN 0042-2886, Vol. 74, no 2, p. 1-18Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [en]

    As the population of the world increases, and economies continue to develop, energy, water, materials of different types, and nutrients for food production will be needed in ever-increasing amounts. The water-energy nexus is well-understood in research circles, but one could modify this paradigm to water-nutrients/materials-energy nexus in order to incorporate recovery of substances that can be recirculated to the anthroposphere. ‘Resources’ would thus include both energy and materials (elements, compounds and mixtures – both organic and inorganic). Research in, and implementation of, recovery of different types of resources – material and energy - from wastewater (municipal, agricultural and industrial) has been going on for quite some time now. It will not be wrong to say that the imperativeness and importance of research in this field has been earnestly appreciated by academia, industry, utilities and governments alike in many parts of the world, over the last decade. This paper is a literature review of selected publications from the period 2010-2018, from a wide range of journals, focusing on resource recovery from wastewater. The selected publications originate from 44 different countries (in six continents) of the world.

  • 5.
    Govindarajan, Venkatesh
    Norwegian University for Science & Technology, Norway.
    Testing different rehabilitation options in the drinking water pipeline network in Oslo using the Dynamic Metabolism Model2014In: Vatten, ISSN 0042-2886, Vol. 70, no 4, p. 215-224Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 6.
    Govindarajan, Venkatesh
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Engineering and Chemical Sciences (from 2013).
    Water pinch analysis: a review of recent peer-reviewed publications2018In: Vatten, ISSN 0042-2886, no 3, p. 147-152Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    As the population of the world increases, the demand for resources of different types will also grow. Water is one such resource. Pinch analysis, as a technique to optimise the utilisation of resources, had its origin in heat recovery and thereby the optimisation of fuel usage in the 1970s during the oil crisis. Since then, it has expanded to encompass a vast swathe of resources – both material and otherwise. Water pinch analysis is one offshoot of this tool (the implementation is labelled as pinch technology). This short article is a focused and selective review of recent publications having ‘pinch analysis’ in their titles and as their ‘core and gist’, during the period 2008-2018, and having water pinch analysis as either the sole focus or one of the foci.

  • 7.
    Govindarajan, Venkatesh
    et al.
    Norwegian University for Science & Technology, Norway.
    Brattebo, Helge
    Norwegian University for Science & Technology, Norway.
    Testing the Power Law on urban water and wastewater pipeline networks2011In: Vatten, ISSN 0042-2886, Vol. 67, no 3, p. 153-160Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 8.
    Govindarajan, Venkatesh
    et al.
    Norwegian University for Science & Technology, Norway.
    Nersund Larsen, Hogne
    Energy and Environment, AsplanViak, Trondheim, Norway.
    Water-energy nexus in urban water utilities: A brief Norwegian outlook2015In: Vatten, ISSN 0042-2886, Vol. 71, no 2, p. 101-109Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 9.
    Hedelin, Beatrice
    et al.
    Division for Engineering Sciences, Physics and Mathematics, Karlstad University.
    Gustafsson, Jan-Erik
    Department of Land and Water Resources Engineering, KTH.
    Swedish Water Management: A Comparison of some Municipal Master Plans and the Requests of the Water Framework Directive2003In: Vatten, ISSN 0042-2886, Vol. 59, no 2, p. 75-80Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    A selection of 14 Swedish municipal master plans have been compared with the requirements of future river basin plans, as prescribed in the Water Framework Directive. The municipal master plans can be considered as the main planning documents to provide guidance for decision-making on water use in Sweden. Thus, they represent the long-term plans for water use. The comparison gives a hint on what effect the implementation of the Water Framework Directive will have on the Swedish water management system.The result shows that most of the prescribed contents of the river basin plan are covered very briefly, or not covered at all, in the master plans. Economic analysis, environmental goals and monitoring are issues that are covered in a highly defective way, compared to what is prescribed for the future river basin plans. Only the identification of protected areas are covered to a high extent. The conclusion is that implementation of the Water Framework Directive will not only change the form of administration and management of water resources in Sweden. Many new aspects concerning the substance and content of water management must also be considered in the future.

  • 10.
    Johansson, Emma
    et al.
    Karlstad University.
    Govindarajan, Venkatesh
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Engineering and Chemical Sciences (from 2013).
    Wastewater treatment plants as energy producers: Comparison of status quo in Sweden and India2018In: Vatten, ISSN 0042-2886, Vol. 73, no 151, article id 160Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    As the population of the world rises and economies grow, both energy and water will be needed in ever-increasing quantities. There is a delicate balance between these two resources called the energy-water (or the water-energy) nexus. One way to reduce the energy consumption associated with wastewater treatment is to use the sludge produced during the process to generate biogas. In most countries in the developed world, the coverage, standards and reliability of wastewater treatment are high.  But as the countries in the developing world are striving towards the living standards of those in the developed world, even as they combat population pressure, it is  imperative that they  learn from the experiences (the mistakes which occurred during the ‘learning-by-doing’ process) of the developed world. In this paper, Sweden has been used as a proxy for the developed world with a well-functioning sanitation infrastructure and reliable power supply; and India (the home country of one of the coauthors) is a proxy for the developing world which lacks the same. A very important starting point for development would be to educate people about the long-term socio-economic and environmental benefits of wastewater treatment

     

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