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  • 1.
    Koivisto, Jenni
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Centre for Climate and Safety (from 2013).
    A Stakeholder Analysis of the Disaster Risk Reduction Policy Subsystem in Mozambique2014In: Risk, Hazards & Crisis in Public Policy, ISSN 1944-4079, E-ISSN 1944-4079, Vol. 5, no 1, p. 38-58Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Climate change is expected to increase the frequency and magnitude of climate related hazards inmany countries. Due to this, disaster risk reduction (DRR) policy has gained a lot of attention inrecent years. DRR policies address complex problems that require inputs from a variety ofstakeholders and hence a multi-stakeholder approach has been advocated widely. However, thepractice of DRR policymaking is challenging and therefore new tools are needed to better understandthe political context of DRR policymaking. This article utilizes an Advocacy Coalition Framework(ACF) approach to describe the political context of the DRR policy subsystem in Mozambique.Through a stakeholder analysis, the article seeks to empirically define subsystem boundaries and toidentify belief systems and key actors therein. The results indicate that the actors can be divided intotwo advocacy coalitions, formed around extant approaches to DRR: disaster management anddevelopment. The article concludes with reflections on the applicability of an ACF approach tostakeholder analysis and as a tool for understanding policy disputes and coordination challenges incomplex settings, such as DRR governance.

  • 2.
    Rydstedt Nyman, Monika
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Centre for Climate and Safety (from 2013). Trafikverket.
    Collective Learning in Organizations – Opportunities and Constraints: Case Study of an Avalanche Blocking a Railway Line2018In: Risk, Hazards & Crisis in Public Policy, ISSN 1944-4079, E-ISSN 1944-4079, Vol. 10, no 3, p. 332-359Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Damaged infrastructures cause costly delays and losses. In this study, a collective learning framework and the theory of loops of learning are applied to a case study to develop a conceptual model on how lessons learned may be put to more effective use. Structures for systematic learning from events may serve as important tools in proactive adaptation for a more resilient infrastructure in future. This article studies an avalanche blocking a railway and an adjacent road in northern Sweden, which involves several interdependencies of critical infrastructures and actors. To enhance resilience future risk assessment and SWOT analyses should include the effects from a changing climate on the vulnerabilities of interdependence among multiple stakeholders and infrastructures. Knowledge-sharing foremost resulted in single-loop learning, leading to incremental changes. Respondents expressed an understanding of the importance of double-loops feedback but sensed that they lacked incentives from top levels in the organization for future reporting of experiences. This lack of incentives may impede establishing collective memory. The findings of this study can be used to improve policy recommendations, and support building resilience through products of learning.

  • 3.
    Rydstedt Nyman, Monika
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Centre for Climate and Safety (from 2013). CNDS, Uppsala; Uppsala Universitet; Swedish Def Univ Stockholm.
    Johansson, Magnus
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Centre for Climate and Safety (from 2013). CNDS, Uppsala; Uppsala Universitet; Swedish Def Univ Stockholm.
    Liljegren, Eva
    CNDS, Uppsala; Uppsala Universitet; Swedish Def Univ Stockholm.
    Systematic Knowledge Sharing in a Natural Hazard Damage Context: How Organizational Borders Limit Lessons Learned2017In: Risk, Hazards & Crisis in Public Policy, ISSN 1944-4079, E-ISSN 1944-4079, Vol. 8, no 4, p. 356-380Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this paper is to increase knowledge about systematic lessons learning in a public-private partnership. Empirically, it focuses on road maintenance in Sweden where the Swedish Transport Administration (STA) is responsible for the state-owned infrastructure and tendered contractors carry out all maintenance. The tendering process stipulates that the stakeholders should enable learning and the knowledge transfer that is, by necessity, required for preventive purposes. Semi-structured interviews with project leaders from the STA and respondents from two tendering contractors of maintenance were used to investigate attitudes to and the understanding of sharing experiences and knowledge about damage caused by weather extremes and the relevance of climate change adaptation in their field. The analysis suggests that most of the respondents' experiences stay within their own organization, which creates parallel feedback loops, rather than becomes shared knowledge that could be used as lessons learned enhancing preventive work against future damage and loss. The analysis indicates imbalance in feedback of knowledge concerning weather extremes and their effects.

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