Change search
Refine search result
1 - 14 of 14
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1.
    Gottfridsson, Patrik
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Service Research Center.
    Different actors' roles in small companies service innovation2014In: Journal of Services Marketing, ISSN 0887-6045, E-ISSN 0887-6045, ISSN 0887-6045, Vol. 28, no 7, p. 547-557Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose-The purpose of the study is to create an initial understanding of how various internal and external actors contribute to the development of new services based on the research question considering "which different actor takes part in small companies' service development processes in order giving access to the resources needed and what roles do they play?" Design/methodology/approach-Due to the lack of previous studies within the area, the focus in this study has been to use a qualitative method to reach a deeper insight about how small companies' service development could be described, as seen from an actor's perspective. Findings-Based on the empirical analysis, the study identifies seven main categories of actors who were involved in the service-development process that contributes with different types of resources and their role varies during the development process. The actors and their roles are presented in a model giving initial understanding how various internal and external actors contribute to the development of new services. Research limitations/implications-Using a qualitative approach, the research results may lack generalizability. Instead, the findings should be seen as an initial starting point for further studies. Practical implications-The paper's highlight a number of actor roles that need to be handled to create possibilities for small companies' service development. Originality/value-The paper fills a research gap in the service innovation research. Traditionally, this research has been focused on larger companies, with a focus on what happens inside the companies.

  • 2.
    Gremyr, Ida
    et al.
    Chalmers Univ Technol, Dept Technol Management & Econ, Div Serv Management & Logist, Qual Management, Gothenburg, Sweden..
    Valtakoski, Aku
    Linkoping Univ, Dept Management & Engn, Business Adm, Linkoping, Sweden..
    Witell, Lars
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Karlstad Business School (from 2013). Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Service Research Center (from 2013). Linkoping Univ, Dept Management & Engn, Linkoping, Sweden.;Karlstad Univ, Serv Res Ctr, CTF, Karlstad, Sweden..
    Two routes of service modularization: advancing standardization and customization2019In: Journal of Services Marketing, ISSN 0887-6045, E-ISSN 0887-6045, Vol. 33, no 1, p. 73-87Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose - This study aims to investigate service modularization in a manufacturing firm, identifies service modularization processes and examines how these processes change the service module characteristics. Design/methodology/approach - The study is based on a longitudinal case study (2008-2017) of a manufacturing firm. The development of six service modules was analyzed using data from interviews with key informants, informal meetings and internal documentation. Findings - This study suggests five service modularization processes, and that service module characteristics, such as standardization and interconnectedness, change in different ways depending on the service modularization processes used. It further identifies two service modularization routes that each combine the service modularization processes in unique ways with replication as a key process to improve both standardization and customization. Practical implications - This study elaborates a framework for service modularization, which can serve as a guideline for developing service modules. It also highlights the differences between product and service modularization, suggesting that the role of service module characteristics such as standardization and customization is specific for services. Originality/value - This longitudinal case study (2008-2017) provides empirical evidence on service modularization and extends existing knowledge on service modularization processes and how they influence service module characteristics.

  • 3.
    Gummerus, Johanna
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Karlstad Business School (from 2013). Hanken Svenska Handelshgsk, Ctr Relationship Mkt & Serv Management, Helsinki, Finland.;Karlstads Univ, CTF Serv Res Ctr, Karlstad, Sweden..
    Lipkin, Michaela
    Hanken Sch Econ, Helsinki, Finland..
    Dube, Apramey
    Hanken Svenska Handelshgsk, Dept Mkt, Helsinki, Finland..
    Heinonen, Kristina
    Hanken Sch Econ, Dept Mkt, Helsinki, Finland..
    Technology in use - characterizing customer self-service devices (SSDS)2019In: Journal of Services Marketing, ISSN 0887-6045, E-ISSN 0887-6045, Vol. 33, no 1, p. 44-56Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose - This study aims to introduce and characterize a specific form of self-service technology (SST), customer self-service devices (SSDs), as well as propose and apply a classification scheme of SSDs to encourage future research on such SSTs. Design/methodology/approach - The paper is based on conceptual development of customer SSDs and exploratory qualitative insight from representatives of companies offering various types of SSDs. Findings - This paper introduces SSDs as customer-possessed and controlled smart service devices aiming to solve problems from the customer's perspective, often within completely new, customer-defined service processes and ecosystems. SSDs are not confined to the company-controlled service environment, and customers may thus use them wherever and whenever they so wish. The study characterizes SSDs based on service and customer use features, as well as on the subject of the service act (self/other vs belongings) and nature of service act (monitoring vs acting). Research limitations/implications - This study is limited to conceptual exploration with qualitative insights from six companies. Future research is needed to empirically study different SSDs by using both qualitative and quantitative approaches in various settings. Originality/value - The paper conceptualizes SSDs as an extension to the traditional SST framework. It contributes to the understanding of how personal handheld devices can contribute to customer experiences. It provides research directions to stimulate further research in SSTs.

  • 4.
    Gustafsson, Anders
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Service Research Center.
    Aksoy, Lerzan
    Fordham Univ, Dept Mkt, New York, NY 10023 USA..
    Brady, Michael K.
    Florida State Univ, Dept Mkt, Tallahassee, FL 32306 USA..
    McColl-Kennedy, Janet R.
    Univ Queensland, UQ Business Sch, Mkt, Brisbane, Qld, Australia..
    Sirianni, Nancy J.
    Northeastern Univ, Dept Mkt, Boston, MA 02115 USA..
    Witell, Lars
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Service Research Center. Linkoping Univ, Dept Business Adm, Linkoping, Sweden.
    Wuenderlich, Nancy V.
    Univ Paderborn, Dept Serv Management, D-33098 Paderborn, Germany..
    Conducting service research that matters2015In: Journal of Services Marketing, ISSN 0887-6045, E-ISSN 0887-6045, Vol. 29, no 6-7, p. 425-429, article id SIArticle in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose - The purpose of this paper is to encourage the reader to think differently about service-related issues and to strive to conduct service research that makes a transformational impact on individuals, organizations and society. The authors suggest that service researchers are in an excellent position to develop research that matters by making stronger connections with theory and elevating purely applied research to research that is higher in both practical relevance and methodological rigor. Design/methodology/approach - This paper takes a conceptual approach, connecting pertinent literature with new ideas highlighted in this special issue. Findings - This paper proposes that service researchers look beyond traditional service applications, take a multi-disciplinary approach to problem-solving and make greater strides towards connecting theory and practice. The authors propose a Model of Rigorous and Relevant Research, and call for fresh thinking across a wide range of research areas, including enhancing the customer experience, crafting innovation, integrating technology and measuring service outcomes. Originality/value - The originality of this essay lies in its focus on revitalizing the discussion on relevance and rigor as a path forward for service research. Additionally, this paper offers new insights on core management aspects of service provision that provide a solid platform for future work in service research.

  • 5.
    Hurley, Erin
    et al.
    Griffith University, Australia.
    Trischler, Jakob
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Service Research Center (from 2013).
    Dietrich, Timo
    Griffith University, Australia.
    Exploring the application of co-design to transformative service research2018In: Journal of Services Marketing, ISSN 0887-6045, E-ISSN 0887-6045, Vol. 32, no 6, p. 715-727Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: This paper aims to investigate in a transformative service research (TSR) context how users can be involved through co-design and what contributions they can make during this process. Design/methodology/approach: A six-step co-design process was used to plan and facilitate two co-design sessions that involved a total of 24 participants. The collected data include field notes, transcripts from group discussions, recordings of idea presentations and the evaluation of ideas. Findings: A recruitment strategy that uses strong networks and sensitizes users through generating awareness of the underlying issue can prevent the waste of valuable resources. During the facilitation stage, experts need to find the fine line between close guidance and giving voice to the users. User-generated ideas set the starting point for new value propositions that more effectively support users in their value creation processes. Research limitations/implications: The findings are limited to one specific sample and design task. Future research is required that investigates the application of co-design to other TSR contexts. Practical implications: In TSR, organizations will need to follow a different co-design approach owing to the sensitive nature of the design task and/or users that are not driven by innovation-related motivations. Organizations should tap into their networks to raise awareness and recruit suitable participants. To capture users’ unique insights and foster the collective creativity, facilitation should focus on enabling participants through the use of design tools and team management. Originality/value: The study contributes new insights into requirements, challenges and benefits of applying co-design to TSR contexts. The study shows that ordinary users, if empowered, can give important insights into the design of new value propositions.

  • 6.
    Jouny-River, Eloide
    et al.
    ESSCA School of Management, Angers, France.
    Reynoso, Javier
    Edvardsson, Bo
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Karlstad Business School (from 2013). Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Service Research Center (from 2013).
    Determinants of Co-creation of B-to-B Services2017In: Journal of Services Marketing, ISSN 0887-6045, E-ISSN 0887-6045, Vol. 31, no 2, p. 85-103Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    PurposeThis paper aims to identify and analyze factors that determine firms' commitment to co-create new services with business customers.Design/methodology/approachA quantitative study based on a scenario method, involving an online survey of French service companies, reveals the determinants of commitment to service co-creation.FindingsCustomer benefits and organizational sacrifices, as well as firm-related factors (specialization, partners' involvement and innovativeness) correlate with firms' commitment to co-create new services. The proposed, empirically grounded model details factors that determine firms' commitment to co-create new services with business customers, including innovative culture as a key determinant.Practical implicationsThe identified factors that affect firms' commitment to co-create services can guide managers' efforts to improve customer relationships and thus their service innovation processes.Originality/valueThis study identifies and analyzes characteristics of committed firms, as well as the benefits and sacrifices they face in co-creating new services, in a novel way. Thus, it helps define the fit between a service offering and business customers' participation in new service development contexts.

  • 7.
    Jouny-Rivier, Elodie
    et al.
    ESSCA School of Management, Angers, France.
    Reynoso, Javier
    Department of Service Management Research, Tecnologico de Monterrey, San Pedro Garza Garcia, Mexico.
    Edvardsson, Bo
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Economic Sciences, Communication and IT, Service Research Center.
    Determinants of services co-creation with business customers2017In: Journal of Services Marketing, ISSN 0887-6045, E-ISSN 0887-6045, Vol. 21, no 2, p. 85-103Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose

    This paper aims to identify and analyze factors that determine firms’ commitment to co-create new services with business customers.

    Design/methodology/approach

    A quantitative study based on a scenario method, involving an online survey of French service companies, reveals the determinants of commitment to service co-creation.

    Findings

    Customer benefits and organizational sacrifices, as well as firm-related factors (specialization, partners’ involvement and innovativeness) correlate with firms’ commitment to co-create new services. The proposed, empirically grounded model details factors that determine firms’ commitment to co-create new services with business customers, including innovative culture as a key determinant.

    Practical implications

    The identified factors that affect firms’ commitment to co-create services can guide managers’ efforts to improve customer relationships and thus their service innovation processes.

    Originality/value

    This study identifies and analyzes characteristics of committed firms, as well as the benefits and sacrifices they face in co-creating new services, in a novel way. Thus, it helps define the fit between a service offering and business customers’ participation in new service development contexts.

  • 8.
    Matthing, Jonas
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Economic Sciences, Communication and IT, Service Research Center.
    Kristensson, Per
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Economic Sciences, Communication and IT, Service Research Center.
    Gustafsson, Anders
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Economic Sciences, Communication and IT, Service Research Center.
    Parasuraman, A
    Department of Marketing, University of Miami, Coral Gables, Florida, USA.
    Developing Successful Technology-Based Services: The Issue of Identifying and Involving Innovative Users2006In: Journal of Services Marketing, ISSN 0887-6045, E-ISSN 0887-6045, Vol. 20, no 5, p. 288-297Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose

    – The aim of this paper is to explore the identification of innovative customers and the effectiveness of employing such customers to generate new service ideas in a technology-based service setting.

    Design/methodology/approach

    – The first study reported here employs the “technology readiness” (TR) construct and involves telephone surveys with randomly selected Swedish consumers. The second involves a field experiment.

    Findings

    – Findings from Study I suggest that the TR is a useful tool for identifying users who exhibit both innovative attitudes and behaviors. The results from Study II show that users with a high TR are highly creative as reflected by the quantity and quality of new service ideas.

    Research limitations/implications

    – The sample size for Study II was relatively small and making empirical generalizations with confidence should await results from studies involving larger samples. However, in sum the research demonstrates that TR appears to be an effective tool for identifying innovative customers who would be both willing to participate in new service development and capable of generating creative ideas.

    Originality/value

    – Service businesses interested in using customers to help generate new ideas could benefit from this research.

  • 9.
    McColl-Kennedy, Janet R.
    et al.
    Univ Queensland, UQ Business Sch, Mkt, Brisbane, Qld, Australia..
    Gustafsson, Anders
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Service Research Center (from 2013). ..
    Jaakkola, Elina
    Univ Turku, Sch Econ, Turku, Finland..
    Klaus, Phil
    Brunel Univ, Sch Business, London, England..
    Radnor, Zoe Jane
    Univ Loughborough, Sch Business & Econ, Serv Operat Management, Loughborough, Leics, England..
    Perks, Helen
    Univ Nottingham, Sch Business, Mkt, Nottingham NG7 2RD, England..
    Friman, Margareta
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Service Research Center (from 2013). Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Department of Social and Psychological Studies (from 2013).
    Fresh perspectives on customer experience2015In: Journal of Services Marketing, ISSN 0887-6045, E-ISSN 0887-6045, Vol. 29, no 6-7, p. 430-435Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose - The purpose of this paper is to provide directions for future research on: broadening the role of customers in customer experience; taking a practice-based approach to customer experience; and recognizing the holistic, dynamic nature of customer experience across all touch points and over time. Design/methodology/approach - The approach is conceptual identifying current gaps in research on customer experience. Findings - The findings include a set of research questions and research agenda for future research on customer experience. Originality/value - This research suggests fresh perspectives for understanding the customer experience which can inspire future research and advance theory and managerial practice.

  • 10.
    Myhrén, Per
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Service Research Center.
    Witell, Lars
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Economic Sciences, Communication and IT, Service Research Center. Department of Business Administration, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Gustafsson, Anders
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Service Research Center.
    Gebauer, Heiko
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Service Research Center. Eawag, Dubendorf, Switzerland & Department of Business Administration, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Incremental and radical open service innovation2018In: Journal of Services Marketing, ISSN 0887-6045, E-ISSN 0887-6045, Vol. 32, no 2, p. 101-112Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose Open service innovation is an emergent new service development practice, where knowledge on how to organize development work is scarce. The purpose of the present research is to identify and describe relevant archetypes of open service innovation. The study views an archetype as an organizing template that includes the competence of participants, organizing co-creation among participants and ties between participants. In particular, the study's interest lies in how open service innovation archetypes are used for incremental and radical service innovation. Design/methodology/approach For the research, a nested case study was performed, in which an industrial firm with nine open service innovation groups was identified. Forty-five interviews were conducted with participants. For each case, first a within-case analysis was performed, and how to perform open service innovation in practice was described. Then, a cross-case analysis identifying similarities and differences between the open service innovation groups was performed. On the basis of the cross-case analysis, three archetypes for open service innovation were identified. Findings The nested case study identified three archetypes for open service innovation: internal group development, satellite team development and rocket team development. This study shows that different archetypes are used for incremental and radical service innovation and that a firm can have multiple open service innovation groups using different archetypes. Practical implications This study provides suggestions on how firms can organize for open service innovation. The identified archetypes can guide managers to set up, develop or be part of open service innovation groups. Originality/value This paper uses open service innovation as a mid-range theory to extend existing research on new service development in networks or service ecosystems. In particular, it shows how open service innovation can be organized to develop both incremental and radical service innovations.

  • 11.
    Svari, Sander
    et al.
    Oslo School of Management, Norway.
    Slåtten, Terje
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Economic Sciences, Communication and IT, Department of Business Administration.
    Svensson, Göran
    Oslo School of Management, Norway.
    Edvardsson, Bo
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Economic Sciences, Communication and IT, Department of Business Administration.
    A SOS construct of negative emotions in customers' service experience (CSE) and service recovery by firms (SRF)2011In: Journal of Services Marketing, ISSN 0887-6045, E-ISSN 0887-6045, Vol. 25, no 5, p. 323-335Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 12.
    Trischler, Jakob
    et al.
    Griffith University, Australia.
    Pervan, Simon J.
    Swinburne University of Technology, Australia.
    Scott, Donald Robert
    Southern Cross University, Australia.
    Exploring the ‘black box’ of customer co-creation processes2017In: Journal of Services Marketing, ISSN 0887-6045, E-ISSN 0887-6045, Vol. 31, no 3, p. 265-280Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose - Many firms use customer co-creation practices with the aim of benefiting from their customers' knowledge, skills and resources. This paper aims to explore co-creation processes which involve users with different background characteristics and motivational drivers.

    Design/methodology/approach -The study builds on an analysis of data from six teams in which users collaborated with in-house professionals for the development of new service concepts. Observations and open-ended questionnaires provided insights into the teams' development processes. Independent experts rated the generated concepts. The data were analysed using cross-comparison matrices.FindingsThe findings suggest that the co-creation process and outcomes can be influenced by numerous intra-team factors, including relationship and task conflicts, participation style, team bonding, team identity and cohesiveness and intra-team collaboration. Their occurrence and influence seem to be linked with a specific team composition. A conceptual co-creation process model and six propositions are used to describe the complex relationships between team composition, intra-team factors and key innovation outcomes.

    Research limitations/implications - Research that investigates user involvement in teams needs to consider the complexity of intra-team factors affecting the development process and outcomes. The findings are limited to a specific setting, design task and user sample. Future research should replicate this study in different sectors.

    Practical implications - Key to customer co-creation is the systematic recruitment of users based on their background characteristics and motivational drivers. For instance, the involvement of users with very specific innovation-related benefit expectations can cause conflict, leading to narrowly focused outcomes. This, however, can be mitigated by the form of facilitation and roles adopted by in-house professionals. Understanding intra-team dynamics can allow the firm to assemble and facilitate customer co-creation so that generated outcomes can align with set innovation targets.

    Originality/value -This paper provides original insights into the "black box" of the customer co-creation process and the complex relationship between team composition, intra-team factors and key innovation outcomes.

  • 13.
    Trischler, Jakob
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Karlstad Business School (from 2013). Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Service Research Center (from 2013).
    Zehrer, Anita
    Management Center Innsbruck, Austria..
    Westman, Jessica
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Department of Social and Psychological Studies (from 2013).
    A designerly way of analyzing the customer experience2018In: Journal of Services Marketing, ISSN 0887-6045, E-ISSN 0887-6045, Vol. 23, no 3, p. 777-788Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this paper is to evaluate the usability of different design methods in understanding the customer experience from a contextual and systemic standpoint.

    Design/methodology/approach

    Three design methods (i.e. personas, observations and collaborative service mapping) were applied to analyze customer experiences in two service settings. These methods’ usability was compared across the two settings.

    Findings

    Personas, as informed by phenomenological interviews, provide insights into the customer’s broader lifeworld context. These insights assist in connecting with and understanding the customer experience from a dyadic customer-firm perspective. The involvement of the customer in service mapping activities supports the validation of findings and gives access to experience dimensions beyond the immediate service setting.

    Research limitations/implications

    The analysis is limited to three design methods and is based on small samples. Future research should systematically review design methods to provide a basis for a more comprehensive

    evaluation.

    Practical implications

    To successfully capture the contextual and systemic nature of the customer experience, managers should apply interpretive approaches and actively involve selected customers as “experts of their experiences”. The study provides guidelines on how design methods can be combined and applied to a more holistic customer experience analysis.

    Originality/value

    The paper shows that design methods, when applied in a combined form, can support an analysis that captures both in-depth insights into the customer’s lifeworld and the complexity of value constellations.

  • 14.
    Witell, Lars
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Service Research Center. Linkoping Univ, Dept Business Adm, Linkoping, Sweden.
    Anderson, Laurel
    Arizona State Univ, WP Carey Sch Business, Tempe, AZ USA.;Arizona State Univ, Ctr Serv Leadership, Tempe, AZ USA..
    Brodie, Roderick J.
    Univ Auckland, Sch Business, Mkt, Auckland 1, New Zealand..
    Colurcio, Maria
    Magna Graecia Univ Catanzaro, Dept Law Hist Econ & Social Sci, Catanzaro, Italy.;Univ Caxias do Sul, Innovat Management, Caxias Do Sul, Brazil..
    Edvardsson, Bo
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Service Research Center.
    Kristensson, Per
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Service Research Center.
    Lervik-Olsen, Line
    Norwegian Business Sch, Dept Mkt, Oslo, Norway..
    Sebastiani, Roberta
    Univ Cattolica Sacro Cuore, Dept Management, I-20123 Milan, Italy..
    Andreassen, Tor Wallin
    NHH Norwegian Sch Econ, Ctr Serv Innovat, Bergen, Norway..
    Exploring dualities of service innovation: Implications for service research2015In: Journal of Services Marketing, ISSN 0887-6045, E-ISSN 0887-6045, Vol. 29, no 6-7, p. 436-441Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose - The purpose of this study is to explore three paradoxes of service innovation and provide a way forward for fresh thinking on the topic. Design/methodology/approach - Through a conceptual model of service innovation research, the authors challenge the "pro-change" bias and explore what can be learnt from the duality of service innovation. Findings - This paper suggests that research moves beyond a firm perspective to study service innovation on multiple levels of abstraction. A conceptual model based on two dimensions, level (individual, organization and society) and outcome (success, failure), is used to pinpoint and explore three dualities of service innovation: adopt-reject, change-static and good-bad. Originality/value - By challenging the traditional perspective on service innovation, the authors present new avenues for fresh thinking in research on service innovation. In this paper, the authors encourage researchers and managers to learn from failures and to acknowledge the negative effects of service innovation.

1 - 14 of 14
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf