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  • 1.
    Engen, Marit
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Service Research Center (from 2013). Inland Norway University of Applied Sciences, Lillehammer, Norway.
    Magnusson, Peter
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Economic Sciences, Communication and IT, Service Research Center.
    Casting for service innovation: The roles of frontline employees2018In: Creativity and Innovation Management, ISSN 0963-1690, E-ISSN 1467-8691, Vol. 27, no 3, p. 255-269Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this paper is to explore the roles of frontline employees (FLEs) in service innovation processes and how they contribute to these roles. In the literature, FLEs are argued to play an important role in service innovation; however, neither the potential types of roles nor what taking on these potential roles means to FLEs, have previously been studied. This study investigates FLEs' actions in different types of service innovation processes. Based on analyses of eight different service business units, FLEs are identified as having either of two sets of roles: (1) leading roles as idea creators, developers and implementers, or (2) supporting roles as problem reporters, advisors and executors. The analysis provides managers with guidelines which can help them to better utilize FLEs as contributors to service innovation, either as leading or supporting actors. These imply different management challenges, which are discussed. Advice on how to tackle these challenges is given on the basis of the findings.

  • 2.
    Kristensson, Per
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Economic Sciences, Communication and IT, Service Research Center. Karlstad University, Faculty of Economic Sciences, Communication and IT, Department of Psychology.
    Magnusson, Peter
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Economic Sciences, Communication and IT, Department of Business Administration. Karlstad University, Faculty of Economic Sciences, Communication and IT, Service Research Center.
    Tuning Users' Innovativeness During Ideation2010In: Creativity and Innovation Management, ISSN 0963-1690, E-ISSN 1467-8691, Vol. 19, no 2, p. 147-159Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract

    Although there is increasing acknowledgment that consumers can contribute useful ideas during the development of innovative services, there has been little empirical examination of how such users can best be managed in order to contribute their ideas to the fuzzy front end of new service development. The present study examines the relationship between the nature of user-created ideas regarding new technology-based services and the characteristics of the users supplying the ideas. In particular, the study investigates whether users ideas become more incremental or more radical depending on the users: (i) awareness of technological restrictions; and (ii) utilization of use experience. The results show that idea creators with high use experience who are unaware of any technological restrictions tend to produce service ideas that are more radical in nature, whereas idea creators with high use experience users who are aware of technological restrictions tend to produce service ideas that are more incremental in nature. The study provides empirical support that ordinary users involved in ideation must, to provide innovative ideas, both have a contextual use experience and not be restricted in their ideation by too much technology information and restrictions on potential feasibility

  • 3.
    Sukhov, Alexandre
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Service Research Center (from 2013).
    The role of perceived comprehension in idea evaluation2018In: Creativity and Innovation Management, ISSN 0963-1690, E-ISSN 1467-8691, Vol. 27, no 2, p. 183-195Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Idea evaluation is a vital stage in the front end of innovation, which helps managers decide the direction of future innovation projects. Often, idea evaluations are crowdsourced from users in order to know their preferences. However, since early ideas are incomplete, evaluations may be exposed to cognitive bias. Previous research suggests that people have a tendency to fill inthe gaps in idea descriptions and understand them implicitly, but this can lead to additional processing and result in the undervaluation of the idea. This study tests the relationship betweenidea completeness, the assessors’ subjective comprehension, and the perceived quality of early ideas for public transport services. The results show that there is no consistently direct effect between completeness and idea quality, which suggests that idea evaluations do not rely on informed decision‐making (i.e., decisions based on the provided information). In fact, people who think they comprehend an idea also perceive its quality more higher than people who do not comprehend it. An increase in completeness acts as an aid for comprehension. These findings have important implications for idea management, and point to the significant effect of incomprehension during evaluation, something which needs to be taken into account when using crowdsourcing.

    The full text will be freely available from 2020-02-28 13:44
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