Change search
Refine search result
1 - 4 of 4
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1.
    Sørensen, Majken Jul
    Coventry University, UK.
    Humor as a Serious Strategy of Nonviolent Resistance to Oppression2008In: Peace and Change, ISSN 0149-0508, E-ISSN 1468-0130, Vol. 33, no 2, p. 167-190Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article explores how humor can be used as one aspect of a strategy of nonviolent resistance to oppression and dictatorship. It combines sociological and philosophical theories about humor's duality and incongruity with theories of nonviolent resistance to oppression in order to investigate the links between topics that have previously been considered unrelated. Experiences from the Serbian Otpor movement, which used humorous actions as a part of its strategy to bring down Slobodan Milošević from power, serve to illustrate the dynamics of humor as a form of resistance. Empirical examples and existing theory are combined to make an outline of an innovative theory of the functions of humor in nonviolent resistance.

  • 2.
    Sørensen, Majken Jul
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Department of Social and Psychological Studies (from 2013).
    Laughing All the Way to Social Change: Humor and Nonviolent Action Theory2017In: Peace and Change, ISSN 0149-0508, E-ISSN 1468-0130, Vol. 42, no 1, p. 128-156Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Activists in both dictatorships and democracies use humor as a method of nonviolent resistance, and its special way of appealing to emotions and imagination through ambiguity frequently sets it apart from other forms of nonviolent action. This study analyzes three examples from twentieth‐century Sweden of the political uses of humor according to the ability of each to facilitate dialogue, break power, serve as an utopian enactment, and be a normative regulation. In these cases, humor is found to have a particular ability to break the power of dominant discourses, because their ambiguity makes them ideal as “guerrilla attacks” in the ongoing discursive guerrilla war the activists are waging.

  • 3.
    Sørensen, Majken Jul
    et al.
    University of Wollongong, Australia.
    Martin, Brian
    University of Wollongong, Australia.
    The Dilemma Action: Analysis of an Activist Technique2014In: Peace and Change, ISSN 0149-0508, E-ISSN 1468-0130, Vol. 39, no 1, p. 73-100Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    When nonviolent activists design an action that poses a dilemma for oppo-nents—for example whether to allow protesters to achieve their objectiveor to use force against them with consequent bad publicity—this is calleda dilemma action. These sorts of actions have been discussed among acti-vists and in activist writings, but not systematically analyzed. We presenta preliminary classification of different aspects of dilemma actions andapply it to three case studies: the 1930 salt march in India, a jail-in usedin the Norwegian total resistance movement in the 1980s, and the free-dom flotillas to Gaza in 2010 and 2011. In addition to defining what isthe core of a dilemma action, we identify five factors that can make thedilemma more difficult for opponents to “solve.” Dilemma actions derivesome of their effectiveness from careful planning and creativity that pushopponents in unaccustomed directions.

  • 4.
    Sørensen, Majken Jul
    et al.
    University of Wollongong, Australia.
    Vinthagen, Stellan
    University West & University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Nonviolent Resistance and Culture2012In: Peace and Change, ISSN 0149-0508, E-ISSN 1468-0130, Vol. 37, no 3, p. 444-470Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article investigates what culture means for nonviolent resistance. While literature on nonviolence has had a tendency to look instrumentally at culture, this article suggests an intertwined relationship. Activists are themselves embedded in their own cultures, and there is no “outside culture.” The authors suggest an innovative model of three strategies for analyzing the cultural aspects of a nonviolent struggle: (1) occasionally borrowing existing powerful symbols and cultural elements, such as flags or religious symbols, which is then applied; (2) partially remodeling“old” culture in the spirit of nonviolence. This strategy is illustrated through the Khudai Khidmatgar of the North-West Frontier Province in the 1930s and shows how the nonviolent struggle there, was “negotiated” with Islam and a traditional code of honor; and finally, (3) systematically creating a nonviolent movement culture, which is a much more complex process, is illustrated through the movement for landless workers in Brazil, the Movimento dos Trabalhadores Rurais Sem Terra.

1 - 4 of 4
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf