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  • 1.
    Gustafsson, Björn
    et al.
    Göteborgs universitet; Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    Katz, Katarina
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Karlstad Business School (from 2013).
    Österberg, Torun
    Göteborgs universitet.
    Residential Segregation from Generation to Generation:: Intergenerational Association in Socio-Spatial Context Among Visible Minorities and the Majority Population in Metropolitan Sweden2016In: Population, Space and Place, ISSN 1544-8444, E-ISSN 1544-8452, ISSN 1544-8444, Vol. 23, no 4Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper, we investigate to what degree young adults live in neighbourhoods that are similar, in terms of relative average household income, to the neighbourhoods in which they grew up. We use regression analysis on register data for all individuals who were born in 1974 and lived in metropolitan Sweden in both 1990 and 2006. During this period, the distribution of income in Sweden became far more unequal, unemployment rose dramatically, earlier housing policies were dismantled, the share of ‘visible minorities’ increased dramatically, and residential segregation increased very considerably. We find a correlation between average neighbourhood incomes at these two points in the sample's life cycle of 0.44, which is more than three times as high as the household income correlation. We also find that half of the children of ‘visible minorities’ grew up in the poorer quartile of neighbourhoods, and of these, almost two-thirds remained in the poorest quartile of neighbourhoods as adults. Several measures indicate that intergenerational persistency in context is lower in metropolitan Sweden than was found in a similar study in the US. However, it appears that if visible minority individuals lived in a neighbourhood in the lowest part of the distribution in Sweden as a child, the probability that they will do so also as adults is as high as the corresponding probability for an African-American person in the US.

  • 2.
    Persson, Linda
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Environmental and Life Sciences (from 2013).
    Lifestyle migrants or “environmental refugees”?: Resisting urban risks2019In: Population, Space and Place, ISSN 1544-8444, E-ISSN 1544-8452, Vol. 25, no 7, article id e2254Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A relatively large group of immigrants to rural parts of inner Scandinavia are of German and Dutch descent. Many are families with young children having moved to unpopular areas, characterised by declining populations and services. Seven households of Dutch and German descent were interviewed with a narrative approach to explore their decision to migrate. It is revealed that they do not fit the common explanations of lifestyle migration. A “tale” of escape emerges as they describe what they wanted to leave behind, primarily risks associated with a neoliberal urban environment such as stress, aggression, and competition. The rural is described as a restful and safe space, like Hobbiton, where urban environmental refugees can exhale and live life a bit more lugnt. Drawing on Focaults “care for the self,” their experiences of the negative effects, of the individualisation of risks, neoliberal competition, and an accelerating society render evasion to a new environment into a means of risk avoidance.

  • 3.
    Åkerlund, Ulrika
    Umeå universitet.
    Strategic lifestyle management in later life: Swedish lifestyle movers in Malta seeking the ’best of both worlds’2017In: Population, Space and Place, ISSN 1544-8444, E-ISSN 1544-8452, Vol. 23, no 1, p. 1-13, article id e1964Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In affluent societies, an active choice of lifestyle is increasingly becoming an option. With increased possibilities for mobility, opportunities to lead a good life can be accessed across global space. However, lifestyle management is largely directed and constrained by structural frameworks, and movers have to allocate resources and experience in order to manoeuvre structures and make optimal lifestyle choices. This paper explores how residential mobility may be used as a resource to gain access to opportunities. Based on thematic analysis of in-depth interviews, this is performed by exploring the experiences of Swedish lifestyle movers in Malta, in their tailoring of mobility practices that allow them to enjoy opportunities for the good life in both countries. The research questions that have guided this study are as follows: (a) What does the good life comprise? (b) How are structural frameworks surrounding opportunities for lifestyle management perceived by movers? and (c) In what ways do movers actively tailor their mobility practices to achieve the good life? The results show that movers are highly engaged in tailoring their access to opportunities through place fixity, such as permanent residency and social integration, and through routinised and timed mobility practices.

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