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  • 1.
    Pamment, James
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Economic Sciences, Communication and IT, Department of Media and Communication Studies.
    Branding the Nation: The Global Business of National Identity2014In: International Journal of Communication, ISSN 1932-8036, E-ISSN 1932-8036, Vol. 8, p. 1803-1806Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 2.
    Pamment, James
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Economic Sciences, Communication and IT, Department of Media and Communication Studies.
    The 2012 Olympics and Its Legacies: State, Citizen, and Corporate Mobilizations of the Olympic Spirit2014In: International Journal of Communication, ISSN 1932-8036, E-ISSN 1932-8036, Vol. 8, p. 2578-2596Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The notion of legacy was intrinsic to London's 2012 bid, drawing upon the Olympic spirit in the form of personal challenges designed to motivate and mobilize individuals and communities in Britain and around the world. However, with the economic crisis and change in government in 2010, a distinct discourse of economic legacy also emerged. This increasingly saw the citizen mobilization associated with the Games in terms of the opportunity to promote the UK as a partner for trade investment. This article explores the state, citizen, and corporate mobilizations motivated by the Olympics. It analyses the structures and discourses supporting a changing conceptualization of legacy, with particular reference to the international communication strategies designed to co-brand national promotion with the Olympic spirit.

  • 3.
    Pamment, James
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Department of Geography, Media and Communication. Univ Texas Austin, USA.
    Wilkins, Karin
    Univ Texas Austin, USA..
    Toward a Common Standard for Aid Transparency: Discourses of Global Citizenship Surrounding the BRICS2016In: International Journal of Communication, ISSN 1932-8036, E-ISSN 1932-8036, Vol. 10, p. 2989-3003Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The impact of BRICS (Brazil, Russia, India, China, and South Africa) and other emerging economies on the field of international development has seen traditional donor nations wrestle with fundamental shifts in the geometry and makeup of the donor community. This has resulted in asymmetrical power relations in organizations such as the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) finding new modes of expression, as the one-way flows of cultural imperialism have given way to the multidirectional uncertainties of globalization. We question how the traditional aid donor community has taken this new geometry into account using discourses surrounding South-South cooperation as a focal point for analysis. The analysis engages with evolving discourses of indifference, skepticism, fear, integration, and conciliation, revealing complex tensions between the OECD's Development Assistance Committee membership, BRICS, and the motivations for aid effectiveness debates.

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  • harvard1
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  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
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  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
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