Change search
Refine search result
1 - 4 of 4
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1.
    Burmeier, Sandra
    et al.
    Justus-Liebig-University Giessen, Germany.
    Donath, Tobias W.
    Justus Liebig University Giessen, Germany.
    Otte, Annette
    Justus-Liebig-University Giessen, Germany.
    Eckstein, Rolf Lutz
    Justus-Liebig-University Giessen, Germany.
    Rapid burial has differential effects on germination and emergence of small- and large-seeded herbaceous plant species2010In: Seed Science Research, ISSN 0960-2585, E-ISSN 1475-2735, Vol. 20, no 3, p. 189-200Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The dynamics of many plant populations essentially depend upon seed and seedling stages, and a persistent seed bank may give species an opportunity to disperse through time. Seed burial is a decisive prelude to persistence and may strongly influence seed-bank dynamics. The fate of buried seeds depends on species-specific traits, environmental conditions and possibly also burial mode. We tested seed germination, seedling emergence and growth of the co-occurring herbaceous flood-meadow species Arabis nemorensis, Galium wirtgenii, Inula salicina, Sanguisorba officinalis and Selinum carvifolia in response to the experimental manipulation of burial depth (0, 1, 2, 4, 8, 12 cm) and substrate type (sand, clay). Increasing burial depth led to decreased germination, emergence and growth in all species studied, and seedling growth differed significantly between substrate types. The responses of species differed on an individual basis, but also showed a higher-ranking pattern based on seed size. Larger-seeded species were able to emerge from greater depths and experienced less depth-mediated growth inhibition than smaller-seeded species, which, in turn, had higher survival rates during burial and were less likely to experience fatal germination. Based on these results, we suggest that herbaceous flood-meadow species have developed two different seed-size based strategies for coping with the extreme recruitment conditions prevailing in flood meadows, the balance of which seems to be maintained by disturbance events.

  • 2.
    Ludewig, Kristin
    et al.
    ustus Liebig University Giessen, 35392 Giessen, Germany;.
    Zelle, Bianka
    ustus Liebig University Giessen, 35392 Giessen, Germany;.
    Eckstein, Rolf Lutz
    ustus Liebig University Giessen, 35392 Giessen, Germany;.
    Mosner, Eva
    Otte, Annette
    ustus Liebig University Giessen, 35392 Giessen, Germany;.
    Donath, Tobias W.
    ustus Liebig University Giessen, 35392 Giessen, Germany;.
    Differential effects of reduced water potential on the germination of floodplain grassland species indicative of wet and dry habitats2014In: Seed Science Research, ISSN 0960-2585, E-ISSN 1475-2735, Vol. 24, no 1, p. 49-61Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Floodplain meadow ecosystems are characterized by high water level fluctuations and highly variable soil water potentials. Additionally, climate change scenarios indicate an increasing risk for summer drought along the northern Upper Rhine and the Middle Elbe River, Germany. While adult plants often persist even after strong changes in water availability, early life phases, such as seed germination and seedling establishment, might be more vulnerable. Therefore we tested whether reduced soil water potentials will affect the germination of meadow species and whether the response varies between (1) forbs indicative of wet and dry habitats and (2) seeds originating from sites along the rivers Elbe and Rhine. We exposed seeds of 20 floodplain meadow species with different moisture requirements from five plant families to a water potential gradient ranging from 0 to -1.5MPa. While across species germination percentage and synchrony decreased, germination time increased at reduced water potentials. Germination of the species indicative of dry habitats decreased more strongly, was slower and less synchronous at reduced water potentials than that of species indicative of wet habitats. Seeds from sites along the rivers Elbe and Rhine did not differ in their germination characteristics. We propose that species of wet sites follow an all-or-nothing-strategy with fast and synchronous germination to maximize competitive advantages, betting on a high probability of moist conditions for establishment (optimists). In contrast, species from dry sites appear to follow a bet-hedging strategy with a moisture-sensing mechanism for unsuitable conditions (pessimists), resulting in a slower and less synchronous germination.

  • 3.
    Ruehl, A. Theresa
    et al.
    Univ Giessen, Inst Landscape Ecol & Resource Management, D-35392 Giessen, Germany..
    Donath, Tobias W.
    Univ Kiel, Inst Nat Resource Conservat, Dept Landscape Ecol, Olshaussenstr 40, D-24118 Kiel, Germany..
    Otte, Annette
    Univ Giessen, Inst Landscape Ecol & Resource Management, D-35392 Giessen, Germany..
    Eckstein, R. Lutz
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Environmental and Life Sciences.
    Impacts of short-term germination delay on fitness of the annual weed Agrostemma githago (L.)2016In: Seed Science Research, ISSN 0960-2585, E-ISSN 1475-2735, Vol. 26, no 2, p. 93-100Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Time of seedling emergence is an important step in the life cycle of annual plants because it may determine subsequent performance and success. Timing of emergence is especially critical to plant performance in habitats like arable fields which are subject to frequent disturbances. Within-season variation in timing of germination in the range of only a few days is typical for many arable weeds. However, since it is unclear whether such small deviations in germination date translate into fitness differences in the course of the life cycle, the aim of this paper was to quantify the effects of short germination delays on plant performance. We conducted two generalized randomized block experiments in an unheated greenhouse to study the impact of delayed germination (1, 2, 3 and 7 d) with and without competition, respectively, on the fitness of the arable weed species Agrostemma githago (L.). We expected that delayed germination significantly reduces fitness in terms of several life-history traits, and that the decrease of fitness is higher in the presence of competition. Under realistic conditions with competition through barley, Agrostemma plants with delayed germination of 7 d produced 54% fewer shoots, 57% less biomass, 52% fewer flowers, 36% lighter seeds and were 23% shorter as compared to control plants without delayed germination. Without additional stress through competition with barley this pattern was less pronounced. Thus, in the situation of interspecific competition, early emerging seedlings have biologically significant fitness advantages over later emerging seedlings of the same species.

  • 4.
    Ruprecht, Eszter
    et al.
    Romania.
    Donath, Tobias W.
    Justus Liebig University Giessen, Germany.
    Otte, Annette
    Justus-Liebig-University Giessen, Germany.
    Eckstein, Rolf Lutz
    Justus-Liebig-University Giessen, Germany.
    Chemical effects of a dominant grass on seed germination of four familial pairs of dry grassland species2008In: Seed Science Research, ISSN 0960-2585, E-ISSN 1475-2735, Vol. 18, no 4, p. 239-248Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Community composition and ecosystem processes during succession may be driven partly by traits of plant species that attain dominance. Here, we addressed the hypothesis that Stipa pulcherrima, the dominant grass of abandoned continental grasslands, controls seedling recruitment of co-occurring species through chemical effects of its litter. Eight species with successful and unsuccessful recruitment under field conditions were selected (four familial pairs) to study experimentally the effects of leaf leachate under four temperature regimes. Since fungi developed in leachate-treated Petri dishes, in another experiment seeds were surface sterilized to remove confounding effects of fungi on recruitment. Leachate affected various stages of seedling recruitment: it significantly reduced seed germination (by 33-94%) and radicle elongation, and it delayed germination of seedlings of all species. In two families, species with unsuccessful field recruitment were more negatively affected than the successful ones. In a third family, the species with successful recruitment was more negatively affected, and in the fourth there were no differences. Similar germination responses after exclusion of fungi through seed-surface sterilization suggested that leachate was responsible for the observed effects on recruitment. Besides other traits and physical/microclimatic effects of accumulating litter, S. pulcherrima influences plant community dynamics and may potentially affect ecosystem processes through its secondary compounds.

1 - 4 of 4
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf