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  • 1.
    Chang, Shu-Nu
    et al.
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för samhälls- och välfärdsstudier.
    Yeung, Yau-Yuen
    Hong Kong Institute of Education.
    Cheng, May Hung
    Hong Kong Institute of Education.
    Ninth graders’ learning interests, life experiences and attitudes towards science & technology2009In: Journal of Science Education and Technology, ISSN 1059-0145, E-ISSN 1573-1839, Vol. 18, no 5, p. 447-457Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Students’ learning interests and attitudes toward science have both been studied for decades. However, the connection between them with students’ life experiences about science and technology has not been addressed much. The purpose of this study is to investigate students’ learning interests and life experiences about science and technology, and also their attitudes toward technology. A total of 942 urban ninth graders in Taiwan were invited to participate in this study. A Likert scale questionnaire, which was developed from an international project, ROSE, was adapted to collect students’ ideas. The results indicated that boys showed higher learning interests in sustainability issues and scientific topics than girls. However, girls recalled more life experiences about science and technology in life than boys. The data also presented high values of Pearson correlation about learning interests and life experiences related to science and technology, and in the perspective on attitudes towards technology. Ways to promote girls’ learning interests about science and technology and the implications of teaching and research are discussed as well.

  • 2.
    Christenson, Nina
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Biology.
    Chang Rundgren, Shu-Nu
    Swedish National Graduate School in Science, Technology and Mathematics Education Research, Linköping Univeristy .
    Höglund, Hans-Olof
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Biology.
    Using the SEE-SEP model to analyse upper secondary students' use of supporting reasons in arguing socioscientific issues2012In: Journal of Science Education and Technology, ISSN 1059-0145, E-ISSN 1573-1839, Vol. 21, no 3, p. 342-352Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    To achieve the goal of scientific literacy, the skills of argumentation have been emphasized in science education during the past decades. But the extent to which students can apply scientific knowledge to their argumentation is still unclear. The purpose of this study was to analyse 80 Swedish upper secondary students' informal argumentation on four socioscientific issues (SSIs) to explore students' use of supporting reasons and to what extent students used scientific knowledge in their arguments. Eighty upper secondary students were asked to express their opinions on one SSI topic they chose through written reports. The four SSIs in this study include global warming, genetically modified organisms (GMO), nuclear power, and consumption. To analyse students' supporting reasons from a holistic view, we used the SEE-SEP model, which links the six subject areas of sociology/culture (So), environment (En), economy (Ec), science (Sc), ethics/morality (Et) and policy (Po) connecting with three aspects, and (KVP). The results showed that students used value to a greater extent (67%) than they did scientific knowledge (27%) for all four SSI topics. According to the SEE-SEP model, the distribution of supporting reasons generated by students differed among the SSI topics. Also, some alternative concepts were disclosed in students' arguments. The implications for research and education are discussed.

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