Change search
Refine search result
1 - 7 of 7
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1.
    Göransson, Kerstin
    et al.
    Mälardalens högskola.
    Malmqvist, Johan
    Nilholm, Claes
    Local school ideologies and inclusion: The case of Swedish independent schools2013In: European Journal of Special Needs Education, ISSN 0885-6257, E-ISSN 1469-591X, Vol. 28, no 1, p. 49-63Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 2.
    Göransson, Kerstin
    et al.
    Mälardalens högskola.
    Nilholm, Claes
    Malmö University.
    A continuing need for conceptual analysis into research on inclusive education: Response to commentators2014In: European Journal of Special Needs Education, ISSN 0885-6257, E-ISSN 1469-591X, Vol. 29, no 3, p. 295-296Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 3.
    Göransson, Kerstin
    et al.
    Mälardalen University.
    Nilholm, Claes
    Malmö University.
    Conceptual diversities and empirical shortcomings - a critical analysis of research on inclusive education2014In: European Journal of Special Needs Education, ISSN 0885-6257, E-ISSN 1469-591X, Vol. 29, no 3, p. 265-280Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this paper is to critically analyse research about inclusive education.Prior reviews and the outcome of a recent search of databases are analysedwith regard to (a) how inclusion is defined and (b) what empirical knowledgethere is regarding factors that make schools and classrooms more inclusive. Ourpoint of departure is that we regard inclusion as an idea about what school systems,schools and classrooms should accomplish, and as such, an expression ofan educational philosophy. Four different understandings of inclusive educationwere found: (a) inclusion as the placement of pupils with disabilities in mainstreamclassrooms, (b) inclusion as meeting the social/academic needs of pupilswith disabilities, (c) inclusion as meeting the social/academic needs of all pupilsand (d) inclusion as creation of communities. Under a strict definition of inclusiveeducation, hardly any research was found which reliably identified factorsthat give rise to inclusive processes. The outcome of our analyses are discussedfrom the perspective that different understandings of inclusion should be seen, toa large extent, as expressions of different views of what schools should accomplish.We also propose that some of the adherents to inclusion as creation ofcommunities can be placed in the grand educational tradition reaching back toDewey that tries to establish new ideals for school systems in a society in whichindividualism is perhaps the main ideology. The main conclusions are that theoperative meaning of inclusion in reviews and empirical research should bemuch more clearly defined and that new types of studies are needed.

  • 4.
    Klang, Nina
    et al.
    Uppsala universitet.
    Gustafsson, Katarina
    Uppsala universitet.
    Möllås, Gunvie
    Jönköping university.
    Nilholm, Claes
    Uppsala universitet.
    Göransson, Kerstin
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Department of Educational Studies (from 2013).
    Enacting the role of special needs educator: six Swedish case studies2017In: European Journal of Special Needs Education, ISSN 0885-6257, E-ISSN 1469-591X, Vol. 32, no 3, p. 391-405Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    With the increasing focus on inclusion, special needs educators (SNEs) are now expected to share responsibility for pupils with teacher colleagues and to lead school development, but it is a challenge to enact this role in schools. The aim of the study was to explore how professional roles of Swedish SNEs are enacted in local school contexts. From a survey of SNEs in 10 Swedish municipalities, six participants whose work tasks were expected to correspond to the degree ordinances for their university training were chosen. The participants were followed at work, and data were collected through observation of the participants at work, participants’ diaries and interviews with the participants, their teacher colleagues and their school principals. The analysis involved both quantitative and qualitative methods. First, based on the researchers’ observations of the participants at work, categories of SNEs’ tasks were discerned, and the amount of time devoted to those categories of tasks was summarised. Second, case study narratives of the SNEs’ work were constructed to describe how the participants, their teacher colleagues and their school principals view the SNE role and to describe how the work is enacted in various school contexts. The results revealed seven categories of work tasks practised to varying degrees by the six SNEs. The case study narratives exposed large variation in how the SNEs conceptualised their role and how it evolved in relation to local school contexts. The results of the study are discussed with regard to the role of the SNE in relation to policies of inclusion.

  • 5.
    Magnússon, Gunnlaugur
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, Eskilstuna, Sweden.
    Göransson, Kerstin
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Department of Educational Studies (from 2013).
    Perimeters of, and challenges to, the jurisdiction of Swedish special educators: an exploration of free text responses2019In: European Journal of Special Needs Education, ISSN 0885-6257, E-ISSN 1469-591X, Vol. 34, no 3, p. 257-271Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Special needs educators (SNEs) have important roles in many education systems. However, their roles are often poorly defined, and differ greatly both between and within education systems. Studies show that SNEs have diverse tasks, have problems defining their jurisdiction, and approach special support with different perspectives than other professions. Here, the aim is to explore what Swedish SNEs express regarding their occupational role and jurisdiction, utilising 676 free text responses to an open question in a total population survey. The results illustrate that SNEs often have to take on tasks they do not view as appropriate and that they often experience misunderstanding from head teachers and colleagues about their roles and tasks, and that they risk being replaced by other professions. Some explanations can be found in vague legal definitions of their jurisdiction and the necessity of adaption to the local school context. The results are interpreted using Abbott’s theory of jurisdiction and Evetts’ distinctions of professionalisation and professionalism. The study confirms results from prior research to a high degree but adds further nuance and dimensions to them with formulations from active professionals.

  • 6.
    Nilholm, Claes
    et al.
    Uppsala universitet.
    Göransson, Kerstin
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Department of Educational Studies (from 2013).
    What is meant by inclusion?: An analysis of European and North American journal articles with high impact2017In: European Journal of Special Needs Education, ISSN 0885-6257, E-ISSN 1469-591X, ISSN ISSN 0885-6257, Vol. 32, no 3, p. 437-451Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this review is to further our knowledge about what is meant by inclusion in research addressing the topic. While it is common to remark that inclusion is defined in different ways in research, few attempts have been made to map and analyse different types of definitions and whether there are patterns to be find in how the concept is used. The 30 most cited journal articles from a North American and a European research arena were selected for analysis. Each article was analysed in relation to genre, theoretical tradition and inclusion concept used. The review yielded several important results. To name a few, a divide was identified between position articles, with developed discussions about and analyses of the meaning of inclusion, and empirical articles, where inclusion signifies that children with disabilities are placed in the mainstream. In addition, writing within a critical theoretical tradition was much more common among positional papers. Further, both arenas are dominated by Anglo-Saxon researchers. It is argued that the conceptual confusion characterising the field impedes its development.

  • 7.
    Tjernberg, Catharina
    et al.
    Stockholms universitet.
    Heimdahl Mattson, Eva
    Stockholms universitet.
    Inclusion in practice: a matter of school culture2014In: European Journal of Special Needs Education, ISSN 0885-6257, E-ISSN 1469-591X, Vol. 29, no 2, p. 247-256Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The main aim of this study was to find out how reading and writing education can work successfully in practice without being exclusive. The teachers preferred heterogenous groups and emphasised the importance of various teaching methods and approaches so as to be able to deal with student diversity. They had a good theoretical foundation and the ability to link-up their theoretical knowledge with what they learned from experience to create action-oriented knowledge. The importance of each student being challenged in the next development zone was stressed. The teachers’ positive belief in their students’ ability and their commitment to the pedagogical process were other central factors. The successful results of the teachers’ work showed the importance of mentorship, co-operation with colleagues and continuous pedagogical discussions, led by a researching teacher, so as to promote the teachers’ own reflective ability. This created an inclusive school culture in which all the students felt they were competent, valued and never excluded.

1 - 7 of 7
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf