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  • 1.
    Hugoson, Anders
    et al.
    Center for Oral Health, School of Health Sciences, University of Jönköping Read More: http://informahealthcare.com/doi/abs/10.3109/00016357.2011.654247.
    Hellqvist, Lena
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Environmental Sciences.
    Rolandsson, Margot
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Environmental Sciences.
    Birkhed, Dowen
    Department of Cariology, Institute of Odontology, The Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg.
    Dental caries in relation to smoking and the use of Swedish snus: epidemiological studies covering 20 years (1983–2003)2012In: Acta Odontologica Scandinavica, ISSN 0001-6357, E-ISSN 1502-3850, Vol. 70, no 4, 289-296 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective. The aim of this study was to evaluate some intra-oral caries-associated variables and tobacco use on dental caries. Materials and methods. The participants were randomly recruited from three cross-sectional studies in Jönköping, Sweden, in 1983, 1993 and 2003. Each study consisted of 130 individuals in each of the 20, 30, 40, 50, 60 and 70-year age groups. Of these, 550, 552 and 523 dentate individuals attended respective year of examination. They were all examined both clinically and radiographically. A questionnaire was completed in conjunction with the examination. In the studies, 345 were smokers, 104 snus users and 1142 non-tobacco users, in total 1591 individuals. Results. In 1983 and 1993, there were no significant differences in mean DFS between non-users and smokers, but a statistically significantly higher mean DFS in comparison with snus users. In 2003, there was no statistically significant difference in mean DFS between the groups. Multiple regressions showed that, after adjusting for age, gender and socio-demographic variables, there was a statistically significant association between DFS and smoking in 1983 (smoking excluded in favour of lactobacilli when further analysed) and DFS and plaqueindex (PLI) in 1993. In 2003, there was no association, apart from buffer capacity (Power rising) between DFS and the examined intra-oral caries-associated variables and tobacco use. Conclusions. The results of these epidemiological studies, performed in 1993 and 2003, indicate that daily smoking or snus use does not increase the risk of dental caries.

  • 2.
    Östberg, Anna-Lena
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Environmental Sciences.
    Adolescents' views of oral health education: A qualitative study2005In: Acta Odontologica Scandinavica, ISSN 0001-6357, E-ISSN 1502-3850, Vol. 65, no 2, 300-307 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The objective of this study was to investigate adolescents perceptions and desires with respect to oral health education. Aseries of focus group sessions was conducted with adolescents in schools. The groups comprised an average of 6 individuals,with a total of 34 participants. The main themes of the discussions were the informants perceptions of the oral healtheducation in different settings and under varying circumstances. The discussions were transcribed verbatim and analyzedaccording to the basic principles of Grounded Theory. One of the most important issues appeared to be the dental personnelconsidering the individual as a subject and not as an object. The adolescents in the study were uncertain about their knowledgeof oral health. Often, the participants expressed a wish to be taught more at the dental visit. Information in schools was sparse.The support of parents was acknowledged but little discussed. The methods used in advertisements to describe dentalproducts were met with skepticism. These should not be imitated in oral health education as this might undermine thecredibility of the dental services. Girls were perceived to be more interested in health than boys were. Two core categorieslabeled credibility and confidence, which interacted continually, emerged from the data in the analysis. The resultsindicate that the credibility of the intermediary of the health messages is essential, as is their ability to create confidence. Thus,oral health education among adolescents is more likely to be successful when credibility and confidence are perceived

  • 3.
    Östberg, Anna-Lena
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Environmental Sciences.
    Andersson, P
    Hakeberg, M
    Oral impacts on daily performances: associations with self-reported health and medication2009In: Acta Odontologica Scandinavica, ISSN 0001-6357, E-ISSN 1502-3850, Vol. 67, no 6, 370-376 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 4.
    Östberg, Anna-Lena
    et al.
    Högskolan i Skövde.
    Eriksson, B
    Högskolan i Skövde.
    Lindblad, U
    Högskolan i Skövde.
    Halling, A
    Malmö Högskola.
    Epidemiological dental indices and self-perceived oral health in adolescents: ecological aspects2003In: Acta Odontologica Scandinavica, ISSN 0001-6357, E-ISSN 1502-3850, Vol. 61, no 1, 19-24 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study was to investigate the correlations between epidemiological indices (objective) and self-perceived oral health (subjective) in adolescents at the school level, and to study gender differences in epidemiological indices and in self-perceived oral health.The study comprised two sets of data from Skaraborg County, Sweden; 1. Self-reported questionnaires were answered by adolescents at all senior level schools (n=9 559, 1315 years). 2. Epidemiological indices based on clinical registrations of oral health in 13-15-year-old adolescents were collected in all 17 municipalities (n= 7 899). Simple and partial Pearson correlation coefficients were used to study correlations between subjective and objective oral health in the adolescents at the school level. Gender differences in adolescents subjective and objective oral health were estimated using a logistic regression model. The correlations between epidemiological index registrations and self-perceived oral health were weak. The strongest correlations were found between epidemiological indices and self-perceived gingival bleeding: 0.416 between the DS (decayed surfaces) index and self-perceived bleeding. Girls more seldom than boys were satisfied with the appearance of their teeth; in municipalities with clinical good oral health OR 0.76 (95% CI 0.59-0.98) and with poor clinical oral health OR 0.74 (CI 0.57-0.94). No gender differences were found in the epidemiological index registrations. The currently used epidemiological indices did not reflect adolescents own perceptions of their oral health at the school level and they could not recognize or identify gender differences. Surveillance of oral health in young people should include information on self-perceived oral health.

  • 5.
    Östberg, Anna-Lena
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Environmental Sciences.
    Halling, A
    Lindblad, U
    Gender differences in knowledge, attitude, behavior and perceived oral health among adolescents1999In: Acta Odontologica Scandinavica, ISSN 0001-6357, E-ISSN 1502-3850, Vol. 57, no 4, 231-236 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A cross-sectional dental questionnaire census survey was conducted in classrooms of 17,280 students aged 13-18 years in Skaraborg County, Sweden. The overall response rate, based on school attendance on the test day, was 91% with no gender differences at the senior level and 86% (boys 87%, girls 85%) at the upper secondary level. The aim was to examine gender differences in knowledge, attitude, behavior, and perceived oral health. A retest study showed good agreement. Thirty-one percent of the girls and 21% of the boys flossed regularly. Eleven percent reported daily candy consumption, with no significant gender difference. Girls, however, more often than boys considered their own consumption to be too high. This gender difference in attitude was most pronounced among older daily consumers (odds ratio (OR)= 5.8[3.7-9.2]). Oral health was regarded as important by a majority of the students (95%). Girls considered sound teeth to be more important than did boys, both among the younger (OR=1.7[1.4-2.1) and the older (OR=2.4[1.9-3.1]) adolescents. Conclusion: Most adolescents had a positive dental attitude and perceived their own oral health to be good. Poorer knowledge and behaviors concerning oral health were demonstrated. Gender differences existed in most issues. Girls scored more favorably on behavioral measures, showed more interest in oral health, and perceived their own oral health to be good to a higher degree than did boys

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