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  • 1.
    Adams, Paul C.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Department of Geography, Media and Communication (from 2013). University of Texas at Austin, USA.
    Geographies of media and communication II: Arcs of communication2018In: Progress in Human Geography, ISSN 0309-1325, E-ISSN 1477-0288, Vol. 42, no 4, p. 590-599Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Some of the most perceptive contributions to the geographic study of media and communication have been in areas of landscapes studies and geohumanities. To bring landscape and geohumanities insights together more explicitly with communication and media, this progress report draws on George Revill’s concept of an ‘arc of sound’, expanding the concept’s scope to an arc of communication – a dynamic trajectory connecting one vantage point to another through various translations and shifts. It is a mix of integration and translation that forms its own space, place and time, integrating elements of embodied performance, multiple sensory modalities, temporality, absence and excess. Arcs of communication often depend on collaboration and can produce transformations of identity. The concept of the arc of communication enables discovery of numerous threads connecting landscape studies to geohumanities while deepening geographical understandings of media and communication.

  • 2.
    Andersson, Martin
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Department of Social and Psychological Studies (from 2013).
    Kjellgren, Anette
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Department of Social and Psychological Studies (from 2013). Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Centre for Public Safety (from 2013).
    The slippery slope of flubromazolam: Experiences of a novel psychoactive benzodiazepine as discussed on a Swedish online forum2017In: Nordic Studies on Alcohol and Drugs, ISSN 1455-0725, E-ISSN 1458-6126, Vol. 34, no 3, p. 217-229Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim: The purpose of this qualitative study was to investigate the effects experienced by users of a novel psychoactive substance, the benzodiazepine flubromazolam, by analysing users' own accounts on the Swedish forum Flashback.org. Method: A thematic analysis of anonymous self-reports published on the forum was performed and generated five general themes describing effects and experiences by flubromazolam users. Results: The themes which emerged were: Onset and duration, Desired effects, Adverse effects and addiction, Loss of control, General estimations and evaluations. The main reported characteristics of flubromazolam were heavy hypnotic and sedative effects, long-lasting amnesiac effects and the rapid development of tolerance. Flubromazolam was also anxiolytic and acted as a muscle relaxant for many users. Some users experienced euphoria or intense wellbeing. Other prominent characteristics were loss of control (leading to poor choices and actions, with unpleasant consequences) and long-lasting, often severe withdrawals. There were also serious incidents where users had been admitted to hospital, acute psychiatric treatment or taken into custody by the police. Conclusion: Flubromazolam appears to be a highly addictive and precarious benzodiazepine with many, possibly severe, side effects. The substance is generally described as very potent and with long-lasting effects. Memory loss and loss of control are common adverse effects, and withdrawals appear to be severe for many users

  • 3.
    Angulo, Julio
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Economic Sciences, Communication and IT, Centre for HumanIT. Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Karlstad Business School.
    Designing for Usable Privacy and Transparency in Digital Transactions2015Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    People engage with multiple online services and carry out a range of different digital transactions with these services. Registering an account, sharing content in social networks, or requesting products or services online are a few examples of such digital transactions. With every transaction, people take decisions and make disclosures of personal data. Despite the possible benefits of collecting data about a person or a group of people, massive collection and aggregation of personal data carries a series of privacy and security implications which can ultimately result in a threat to people's dignity, their finances, and many other aspects of their lives. For this reason, privacy and transparency enhancing technologies are being developed to help people protect their privacy and personal data online. However, some of these technologies are usually hard to understand, difficult to use, and get in the way of people's momentary goals.

    The objective of this thesis is to explore, and iteratively improve, the usability and user experience provided by novel privacy and transparency technologies. To this end, it compiles a series of case studies that address identified issues of usable privacy and transparency at four stages of a digital transaction, namely the information, agreement, fulfilment and after-sales stages. These studies contribute with a better understanding of the human-factors and design requirements that are necessary for creating user-friendly tools that can help people to protect their privacy and to control their personal information on the Internet.

  • 4. Bakardjieva, Maria
    et al.
    Svensson, Jakob
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Economic Sciences, Communication and IT, Department of Media and Communication Studies.
    Skoric, Marko
    Digital Citizenship and Activism: Questions of Power and Participation Online2012In: JeDEM eJournal of eDemocracy, ISSN 2075-9517, Vol. 4, no 1, p. i-ivArticle in journal (Other academic)
  • 5.
    Birgersson, Emelie
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Department of Educational Studies.
    IKT i förskolan: En studie om förskollärares upplevelser av IKT som verktyg för språkutveckling2018Independent thesis Basic level (professional degree), 210 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    This is a qualitative interview study which examines preschool pedagogues' experiences and thoughts about digital learning resources as a pedagogical tool for working with language development in preschools and how this may affect the pedagogical design of the work environment with children. The method consists of a qualitative scientific procedure grounded in semi-structured interviews with four preschool teachers. The results show that the preschool teachers see digital learning resources as an enriching pedagogical tool for language development and with a potential in several varying areas in relation to the learning of language. Most preschool teachers deemed themselves sufficiently knowledgeable and competent while working with these resources. They also considered the children as very competent and with lots of experience in the area. There were also shortcomings outlined in relation to proficiency and clear guidelines in the work with digital learning resources for the development of language. This may depend on several different factors such as clarity regarding guidelines in the Swedish national preschool curriculum, Lpfö98, and deficient understanding in this area. The study has outlined both possibilities and limitations in the work with digital learning tools for development of language which, hopefully, will contribute for further development in this area.

  • 6.
    Burkart, Patrick
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Economic Sciences, Communication and IT, Department of Media and Communication Studies.
    Iverson, Joel
    University of Montana.
    Theoretical and practical approaches to cyberinfrastructure, virtual research environment, and virtual organizing for e-science, e-social science, and digital humanities2011Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Cyberinfrastructure and virtual research environment related conversations over the last two NCA conferences acknowledged the need to explore communication theories in virtual organizational context for large-scale research. This two-part panel explores the theoretical and practical issues related to the communication processes of technology implementation, virtual organizing, distributed collaboration, and online scholarly activities by researchers in hard sciences, social sciences, and humanities. We aim to identify disciplinary, technological, processual, and human factors of effective virtual organizing.

  • 7.
    Bäcke, Maria
    Blekinge Institute of Technology.
    Make-Believe and Make-Belief in Second Life Role-Playing Communities2012In: Convergence. The International Journal of Research into New Media Technologies, ISSN 1354-8565, E-ISSN 1748-7382, Vol. 18, no 1, p. 85-92Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This feature article applies the concepts of ‘make-believe’ and ‘make-belief’ formulated by performance theorist, Richard Schechner, in a study of two role-play communities, Midian City and Gor in the online 3D environment Second Life. With make-believe fantasy role-play at their core, members of the two communities negotiate the social and political norms, the goals of the com- munity and as well as the boundaries of the virtual role-play. The article explores the innovative forms of interaction at play in these negotiation processes, using (cyber)ethnographic methods and the analysis of various textual sources, Goffman’s theories of social performance as well as various types of performance discussed by Schechner and Auslander. The innovative forms of interaction are analysed in the light of the new technology and as performances and make-belief strategies directed towards realizing performative utopias, towards influencing the direction in which leaders and residents of this digital context want the role-play to develop, and towards shaping the emer- gent social and cultural rules and the political framework of the role-play. 

  • 8.
    Bäcke, Maria
    Blekinge Tekniska högskola .
    Power Games: Rules and Roles in Second Life2011Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This study investigates how the members of four different role-playing communities on the online platform Second Life perform social as well as dramatic roles within their community. The trajectories of power influencing these roles are my main focus. Theoretically I am relying primarily on performance scholar Richard Schechner, sociologist, Erving Goffman, and post-structuralists Michel Foucault, Gilles Deleuze and Felìx Guattari. My methodological stance has its origin primarily within literature studies using text analysis as my preferred method, but I also draw on the (cyber)ethnographical works of T.L. Taylor, Celia Pearce, and Mikael Jakobsson. In this dissertation my focus is on the relationship of the role-player to their chosen role especially in terms of the boundary between being in character, and as such removed from "reality," and the popping out of character, which instead highlights the negotiations of the social, sometimes make-belief, roles. Destabilising and problematising the dichotomy between the notion of the online as virtual and the offline as real, as well as the idea that everything is "real" regardless of context, my aim is to understand role-play in a digital realm in a new way, in which two modes of performance, dramatic and social, take place in a digital context online.

  • 9.
    Daleke, Sarah
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Department of Geography, Media and Communication.
    Communicative Democracy: Developing leadership accountability through ICTs: A qualitative case study from the Rwenzori region in western Uganda2014Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    There is a growing interest in the use of Information Communication Technologies (ICTs) for citizen engagement in democracy around the world today, especially in the developing world. Events such as the Arab Spring show the potential ICTs can have on citizen engagement with those in leadership positions. Many studies have been conducted within the field of ICT4D (Information Communication Technologies for Development) in many different areas. But few studies have been done within the field of ICT4D that have focused on what happens with the local politicians´ situation in developing countries, when the citizens in these areas become digitally engaged. For a community to develop all levels within the community need to be developed and empowered, because if the local leaders do not have the tools or the incentive to meet the citizens demands then the wanted requirements cannot take place. Effective democratic and open government depends on closing the feedback loop between citizens and government (Making All Voices Count, 2014).

     

    The aim of this study is to get an understanding of the local politicians´ situation in Rwenzori region in western Uganda, as the citizens in this region successively have started to demand much more accountability from their leaders through ICTs.

    The main question guiding this study is:

    How are local political leaders in developing countries coping with citizens who are increasingly using ICT4D tools for leadership accountability?

    With the sub-questions being:

    How have ICTs changed the communication between the local political leaders and the citizens?

    Do the local political leaders have the ICT skills, tools and means they need to meet the digitally engaged citizens?

    Is leadership accountability improved through the use of ICTs?

    To conduct this study I have used qualitative interviews. And the main theory applied is Jürgen Habermas´s theory of communicative action. In essence Habermas’s theory tries to explain the social structures through an understanding of the ways in which communication is framed and organized (Unwin, 2009). The results are presented in form of selected quotes that reflect and represent the findings of this research, which are analyzed through the lens of the theory of communicative action.

    This research shows that the local political leaders in the Rwenzori region appreciate the increased demands from the citizens through ICTs. The research also reveals that ICTs have eased the communication between the local political leaders and their communities and therefore have contributed greatly to increase two-way-communication between the leaders and the citizens. But at the same time these local political leaders are also facing challenges when it comes to holding themselves accountable through the same channels. Some of these challenges are weak infrastructure, lack of skills and access to the ICTs themselves. One of the most notable findings that this research came across is the fact that hardly any of the local politician offices in the Rwenzori region has a budget targeted for communication with their communities. In conclusion this study reveals that leadership accountability in the Rwenzori region is improved through the use of ICTs, but an enabling environment is necessary if leadership accountability through ICTs is to be fully realized. 

    Looking at the results from this research through Habermas´s theory of communicative action has helped making visible not only the prospects of ICTs in democratic development, but also the challenges of using the same mediums.

  • 10.
    Enochsson, Ann-Britt
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Education, Department of Education.
    Barns internetsökning i skolan2005In: Utbildningsvetenskap 2005: Resultatdialog och framåtblick, Stockholm: Vetenskapsrådet , 2005, Vol. 13:2005, p. 56-60Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 11.
    Enochsson, Ann-Britt
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Education, Department of Education.
    Children choosing web pages2001In: New Review of Information Behaviour Research, ISSN 1471-6313, E-ISSN 1740-7877, Vol. 2, no November, p. 151-165Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article reports on part of a research project about children's searches for information on the Internet. The focus of the study is what children consider to be good web pages, combined with their ability to reflect upon the reliability of the Internet. The study is a case study of a group of fourth grade children searching for information, mainly at school. However, in interviews and conversation with the children, information-seeking both at school and at home was discussed. In this class, the teacher had a clear aim to start teaching from the children's questions and to discuss the reasonableness in the answers the students found.Children age 9 - 11 have the potential to reflect upon the reliability in web pages and they do actually do this. The teaching methods in this case study probably contribute to the development of a greater awareness about lies on the Web. It is important not only to have time to search, but also to discuss the results. If we want our children to be effective information handlers, there is no point in postponing the start of this development.

  • 12.
    Enochsson, Ann-Britt
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Education, Department of Education.
    Datorn som redskap för lärande2002In: Nytt om data i skolanArticle in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 13.
    Enochsson, Ann-Britt
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Education, Department of Education.
    Lunar gör det svåra lättare: men är bara ett komplement för dagens ungdomar2003In: Utbilder, tidskrift för pedagogisk debatt från Karlstads universitet, Vol. 3/4Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 14.
    Enochsson, Ann-Britt
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Education, Department of Education.
    The development of children's Web searching skills: a non-linear model2005In: Information research, ISSN 1368-1613, E-ISSN 1368-1613, Vol. 11, no 1Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction.The aim of this article is to determine the various skills necessary for seeking information on the Internet in educational settings. Throughout the article there is also an aim to present the students' perspective on possibilities and difficulties when using the Internet.Methods.The approach is ethnographic, which requires various data collection methods. In total 110 students in four different settings have participated.Analyses.The analyses were partly made with the help of the software NUD*IST for qualitative analyses, where sentences both from interviews and field notes were coded. Some analyses were of qualitative nature and based on selected material from the coded texts. Others were strictly quantitative and compared data from coded qualitative material with questionnaires and computer logs in a database sheet. In ethnographic analyses the material is read several times and compared in different ways to see what themes will emerge. In this case the respondents have also commented upon the result.Result.The students regard six different skills as fundamental: language, knowledge about the technology, knowledge about different ways of information seeking, how search engines work, setting goals and being critical

  • 15.
    Fast, Karin
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Department of Geography, Media and Communication (from 2013).
    Selling (the idea of) mediatization: Contemporary technology discourse and the indispensability of mobile media in work/life2017In: NordMedia: Mediated Realities – Global Challenges, 2017Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Hitherto, and mainly by way of ethnographic studies, mediatization research has informed us about the relevance, influence, and role of media in various spheres of social life. Less is known, however, about how mediatization is discursively constructed. The relevance of constructivist approaches to mediatization has been explicated e.g. by Krotz (2017), who calls for critical mediatization studies that consider the economic interests of mediatization stakeholders, including the ICT industry. Against this backdrop, this paper scrutinizes what the alleged ‘mobility revolution’ entails according to some of those who would benefit the most from such a revolution. More concretely, the paper studies the discursive practices of three leading corporations in the mobile communications sector: IBM, Huawei, and Ericsson. Stimulated by critical mediatization theory as well as related accounts of the (technology) discourse-reality relationship, the paper asks: if mobile media changes ‘everything’ in life – whose lives are being changed? If mobile media are ‘indispensable’ to modern ways of living – what are they supposed to do? Ultimately, the paper speaks to the theme of this special issue by interrogating how contemporary mobile technology discourse contributes to the (re-)production of social space. Findings suggest that mediatization is constructed as the response to an internal human drive for connectivity and as an inexorable natural force. Three sub-discourses on mobile technology are identified: ‘technologies of cosmos’, ‘technologies of self’, and, ultimately, ‘technologies of life’. Altogether, these sub-discourses disclose and reinforce the hegemonic nature of mediatization by communicating the indispensability of mobile media in modern – notably, urban and privileged – lives. In addition to providing answers to the study’s empirical questions, the paper includes a discussion about the potential implications of existing discourse overlaps between ICT companies and mediatization theorists, as well as a sketch for an agenda for the ‘discursive turn’ in mediatization studies.

  • 16.
    Friman, Margareta
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Economic Sciences, Communication and IT, The Service and Market Oriented Transport Research Group. Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Service Research Center (from 2013). Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Department of Social and Psychological Studies (from 2013). Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Karlstad Business School (from 2013).
    Gärling, Tommy
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Economic Sciences, Communication and IT, The Service and Market Oriented Transport Research Group. Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Service Research Center (from 2013).
    Ettema, D.
    Utrecht University, The Netherlands.
    Improvement of public transport services for non-cycling travelers2018In: Travel Behaviour & Society, ISSN 2214-367X, E-ISSN 2214-3688Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper, we argue that the current focus on cycling must not neglect the need to improve public transport services for the large number of people who do not want to or are unable to cycle. An attractive public transport service is currently therefore the most important component of a sustainable transportation system. The question we address is what measures are needed to improve public transport to make people who do not cycle satisfied with the services such that their well-being increases. Based on research studies of satisfaction with public transport, measures at three levels of public transport services (use, access/egress, and overall) are identified and discussed.

  • 17.
    Gebauer, Heiko
    et al.
    Eawag, Dübendorf, Switzerland.
    Paiola, M
    University of Padua, Padua, Italy.
    Edvardsson, Bo
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Economic Sciences, Communication and IT, Service Research Center. Karlstad University, Faculty of Economic Sciences, Communication and IT, Department of Business Administration.
    A capability perspective on service business development in small and medium-sized suppliers2012In: Scandinavian Journal of Management, ISSN 0956-5221, E-ISSN 1873-3387, Vol. 28, no 4, p. 321-339Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Existing research suggests three theoretical pathways for service business development. The first pathway involves incremental enhancement of relational value for existing supplier–buyer relationships (Alpha). The second pathway captures financial value-seeking behavior in existing and new supplier–buyer relationships (Beta). The third pathway is a radical leap toward a new value constellation downstream in the value chain (Gamma). Our main research question aims at the exploration of these three pathways with respect to small and medium-sized suppliers. The research design is based on an exploratory study and an in-depth study. The exploratory study was able to replicate these three pathways in the empirical context of small and medium-sized suppliers. The in-depth study explores and describes co-evolvement of the dynamic and operational capabilities of each pathway. The results provide testable propositions that can be used to guide future research. The paper offers a comprehensive framework that will assist researchers in the conceptualization of paths for service business development and in the operationalization of capabilities. For managers, its value lies in a description of the capabilities needed to achieve an incremental enhancement of relational value in existing supplier–buyer relationships (Alpha), financial value-seeking behavior in existing and new supplier–buyer relationships (Beta), and radical leaps into new value constellations downstream in the value chain (Gamma).

  • 18.
    Gomez Corrochano, Daniel
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Economic Sciences, Communication and IT, Department of Media and Communication Studies.
    Social Networks and the flow of people: The effects of computer-mediated communication on mobility of young people from a rural area in Spain2012Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    This research examines how social networking fosters the mobility of young people in a rural Spain. Generally, rural areas have been overlooked in the discourse on Globalization and Network Society, which is the foundation of the concept of “linked city”. Although many scholars have highlighted the direct link between the increase in the modes of communication of people and the increase of any kind of interaction, face-to-face included, it is necessary to stress that most of these studies are conducted in urban context where a certain grade of efficient transport exists. This study provides an approach to the impact of mediated communication on the lives of people in villages. Based on the concept of Digital Natives this study addresses the Social Network use of young people in a determined rural area in Spain and its correlation with the aim of mobility of the respondents. The results bring to light a certain degree of correlation between the increase of interaction via the Internet and the wish of mobility. Besides, this study uncovers a transportation shortage among locations in this rural area that forces young people to reduce the face-to-face interactions around specific nodes (e.g. High School or a near big city). Finally this study stresses the need for improvement of the transportation networks in terms of cost, flexibility, functionality and reach among rural population in order to avoid a cultural, economic and social backwardness in comparison to urban environments.

  • 19.
    Harrer, Simon
    et al.
    University of Bamberg.
    Lenhard, Jörg
    University of Bamberg.
    Wirtz, Guido
    University of Bamberg.
    Open Source versus Proprietary Software in Service-Orientation: The Case of BPEL Engines2013In: Service-Oriented Computing: 11th International Conference, ICSOC 2013, Berlin, Germany, December 2-5, 2013, Springer Berlin/Heidelberg, 2013, p. 99-113Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    It is a long-standing debate, whether software that is developed as open source is generally of higher quality than proprietary software. Although the open source community has grown immensely during the last decade, there is still no clear answer. Service-oriented software and middleware tends to rely on highly complex and interrelated standards and frameworks. Thus, it is questionable if small and loosely coupled teams, as typical in open source software development, can compete with major vendors. Here, we focus on a central part of service-oriented software systems, i.e., process engines for service orchestration, and compare open source and proprietary solutions. We use the Web Services Business Process Execution Language (BPEL) and compare standard conformance and its impact on language expressiveness in terms of workflow pattern support of eight engines. The results show that, although the top open source engines are on par with their proprietary counterparts, in general proprietary engines perform better

  • 20.
    Jaakkola, Elina
    et al.
    Univ Turku, Sch Econ, Dept Mkt, Turku, Finland..
    Meiren, Thomas
    Fraunhofer Inst Ind Engn, Dept New Serv Dev, Stuttgart, Germany..
    Witell, Lars
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Economic Sciences, Communication and IT, Service Research Center. Linkoping Univ, Linkoping.
    Edvardsson, Bo
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Service Research Center (from 2013).
    Schfer, Adrienne
    Lucerne Univ Appl Sci & Arts, Dept Serv Management, Luzern, Switzerland..
    Reynoso, Javier
    Tecnol Monterrey, Dept Serv Management Res, San Pedro Garza Garcia, Mexico..
    Sebastiani, Roberta
    Univ Cattolica Sacro Cuore, Dept Econ & Business Management Sci, Milan, Italy..
    Weitlaner, Doris
    Campus 02 Univ Appl Sci, Dept Informat Technol & Business Informat, Graz, Austria..
    Does one size fit all?: New service development across different types of services2017In: Journal of Service Management, ISSN 1757-5818, E-ISSN 1757-5826, Vol. 28, no 2, p. 329-347Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose - The extant new service development (NSD) literature tends to assume that the key practices for NSD identified in one context apply for all services, and has failed to sufficiently consider differences in NSD between service types. The purpose of this paper is to explore the nature of NSD across different service types. Design/methodology/approach - An extensive, cross-sectoral survey was conducted in seven countries. Data from 1,333 NSD projects were analyzed to empirically derive a service typology and examine if and how different types of services vary in terms of NSD resources, practices, methods, and results. Findings - Based on six service characteristics, the study identifies four service types: routine-intensive, technology-intensive, contact-intensive, and knowledge-intensive services. The study also identifies specific NSD resources, practices, methods, and results that are prevalent across the service typology. The evidence indicates that the use of advanced practices and methods differs dramatically between service types. Practical implications - The paper enables practitioners to expand their current understanding on NSD by providing insights into the variability of NSD across service types. The results suggest that either service-type-specific models or a configurable model for NSD should be developed. Originality/value - This study provides one of the first empirically derived service typologies for NSD. The study demonstrates that NSD resources, practices, methods, and results differ across service types, thereby challenging the "one size fits all" assumption evident in current NSD research.

  • 21.
    Jansson, André
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Economic Sciences, Communication and IT, Department of Media and Communication Studies. Karlstad University, Faculty of Economic Sciences, Communication and IT, Centre for HumanIT.
    Mediatization, Spatial Coherence and Social Sustainability: The Role of Digtial Media Networks in a Swedish Countryside Community2010In: Culture Unbound: Journal of Current Cultural Research, ISSN 2000-1525, Vol. 2, p. 177-192Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 22.
    Jennings Saul, Caroline
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Service Research Center (from 2013). Eawag: Swiss Federal Institute of Aquatic Science and Technology, Environmental Social Sciences, Dübendorf, Switzerland.
    Gebauer, Heiko
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Service Research Center (from 2013). Eawag: Swiss Federal Institute of Aquatic Science and Technology, Environmental Social Sciences, Dübendorf, Switzerland.
    Digital transformation as an enabler for advanced services in the sanitation sector2018In: Sustainability, ISSN 2071-1050, E-ISSN 2071-1050, Vol. 10, no 3, article id 752Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    People in Base of the Pyramid markets still face difficulties when it comes to sanitation. Container-based Sanitation (CBS) services represent a promising advanced sanitation service. Despite the observed outcomes of CBS services, organizations face obstacles when providing these services. To overcome these obstacles, digital transformations of these services are being carried out. We rely on multiple case studies to understand these digital transformations. Our findings highlight (1) the challenges these case organizations faced before engaging in the digital transformation, (2) their individual digital transformation pathways, and (3) a general framework for digital transformations in BoP markets.

  • 23.
    Karlsson, Michael
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Department of Geography, Media and Communication (from 2013).
    Clerwall, Christer
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Department of Geography, Media and Communication (from 2013).
    Nord, L.
    Mid Sweden University, Sweden.
    The public doesn’t miss the public. Views from the people: Why news by the people?2018In: Journalism - Theory, Practice & Criticism, ISSN 1464-8849, E-ISSN 1741-3001, Vol. 19, no 5, p. 577-594Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    One of the main debates within journalism research during the last decade has been the role of citizens as contributors or, conversely, as threats to the practice of journalism. While participation has been explored from many different theoretical, empirical, and methodological perspectives, one perspective remains noticeably underexplored – the perspective of the citizens themselves. Using social contract theory as a backdrop, this study draws on a representative survey (N = 2091) and focus groups (N = 82) in Sweden. The results show that although citizens do not bring up participation as an important element of journalism, they become more skeptical the more participation affects journalism. Furthermore, they expect journalists to moderate citizen contributions according to established journalistic standards. From the perspective of social contract theory, participation in journalism appears to be more of a problem than a benefit to citizens.

  • 24.
    Kumar, Vikas
    et al.
    Society for Education and Research Development.
    Svensson, JakobKarlstad University, Faculty of Economic Sciences, Communication and IT, Department of Media and Communication Studies.
    Proceedings of M4D 2012 28-29 February 2012 New Delhi, India2012Conference proceedings (editor) (Refereed)
  • 25.
    Lind, Jenny
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Department of Educational Studies (from 2013).
    Digitalt bildskapande i förskolan: En kvalitativ studie om förskollärares uppfattningar av undervisning i digitalt bildskapande i förskolan2019Independent thesis Basic level (professional degree), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of the thesis is to contribute with knowledge of preschool teachers' perceptions of working with digital imaging in image teaching. I collected the empirical material by qualitative semi-structured interviews, along with an interview-guide. The respondents were eight preschool-teachers, who works on five different preschools in the middle of Sweden. I analyzed the empirical material with research and by an analysis-model from phenomenography. The result shows that the perceptions were varied. They felt positivity to begin conduct teaching in digital imaging after the curriculum be valid July 1, 2019. 

  • 26.
    Mehrabov, Ilkin
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Centre for HumanIT. Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Department of Geography, Media and Communication.
    Applying ICT for Development Perspective in Sweden: Renewed Look at Developed Countries from the Lens of ICT4D2014Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Most of the current research conducted within the scope of information and communication technologies for development (ICT4D) looks at ICTs and more general media usage in non-European, developing country contexts and frequently employs technologically deterministic perspectives. There are very few studies applying the ICT4D perspectives within the Western societies and by focusing solely on developing countries scholars often neglect the fact that the demographics, social structure and context of developed countries have dramatically changed during the course of last few decades. Yet, as Ngomba (2013) points out, the impacts and implications of the recent financial and economic crises in Europe and USA, as well as resulting rigorous austerity policies constitute significant ‘shocks’ that should shape the future of academic and popular research about the role communication technologies play within the social change processes.

     

    This paper is focused on the ongoing doctoral research at Karlstad University, which in line with Morley (2009)’s call for de-Westernized, non-media centric and materialist approaches to media studies, is focused on transnational migrant communities living in Sweden, their daily media usage, and related individual development and communal empowerment changes. Paper argues that only through the analysis of empirical data focused on how people actually use media and ICTs within the context of everyday life, of “how media do, and do not, figure in people's lives" (Couldry, 2006, p. 177), better and more pinpointed strategies for welfare development, urban poverty reduction and elimination of growing social inequalities can be elaborated on, thus leading to sustainable future.

  • 27. Niang, Ibrahima
    et al.
    Scharff, ChristelleWamala, CarolineKarlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Centre for HumanIT (from 2013).
    Proceedings of the 4th International Conference on M4D Mobile Communication for Development: M4D 2014, General Tracks2014Conference proceedings (editor) (Refereed)
  • 28.
    Nilsson, Erica
    Karlstad University.
    En modell för att uppnå framgångsrik användarcentrerad systemdesign2012Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [sv]

    Det finns en uppsjö av metoder och verktyg för att uppnå den perfekta systemdesignen för användarna, men åsikterna om vad som är rätt och fel går ofta isär. Genom att studera olika metoder och verktyg har undersökningen lett till ett nytt ramverk med utvalda delar från dessa, ett ramverk som även får med den affärsmässiga nytta och flexibilitet som användarcentrerat arbete måste innehålla för att nå fram till alla intressenter i IT-projekt. Att inrikta sig för mycket på användarfokus behöver inte alltid vara en fördel. I studien redogörs för användarcentrerad systemdesign, men även några författares åsikter som omkullkastar de ursprungliga tankesätten runt användarcentrerad systemdesign.

    Metoden i undersökningen har varit traditionell på det sättet att jag har byggt min forskning på andras kunskap och tidigare forskning, det vill säga genom litteraturstudier och insamling av empiri samtidigt som jag valt att forska vidare genom att delta aktivt i ett verkligt projekt, så kallad aktionsforskning. Andra företagna aktiviteter är prototyping och användartester med Ozlab – som inte kräver programmering för att visa interaktion samt referensgrupp. Studien har även utmynnat i en slutrapport till Konsumentverket där modellen och dess delar presenteras.

  • 29.
    Sartoretto, Paola
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Economic Sciences, Communication and IT, Department of Media and Communication Studies.
    Becoming an incidental media activist: On Brazilian Landless  Workers’ Movement struggle to construct arenas for communication.2014Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Brazilian Landless Workers’ Movement (MST) has since its creation in 1984 acted for the promotion of agrarian reform and rural workers’ and their families’ rights to education, healthcare, culture and infrastructure. Throughout its trajectory, the social movement faced the difficulties that arise from the scarcity of arenas and resources to communicate. Recognising at early stage that voice matters (cf. Couldry 2010) and that the means to form and express opinions are not equally available in a society, MST has since its foundation being active in constructing and maintaining communication channels on the side of the core cause of promoting agrarian reform. The article is based on fieldwork carried out in 2013 and 2014 and interviews with MST militants working with communication. The analysis of the material raises questions of relevance, potential and actual achievements of media activism. From the realisation, at an early stage, that voice is an important element in the promotion of social change; MST started their activities as incidental media activists. These activities run parallel and complement the movement’s work and include demands to change community radio legislation in Brazil and participation in FNDC, the National Forum for Democratisation of Communication. Based Fraser’s (2009) view of justice as a matter of recognition, redistribution and representation and on Couldry’s (2010 and 2013) critique of corporative media’s role in neoliberalism, this article discusses the experience of MST in becoming an incidental actor in the democratisation of media. The term incidental is used here to draw attention to the importance of voice for those considered marginal, even if acting on another aspect of marginality. 

  • 30.
    Svensson, Jakob
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Economic Sciences, Communication and IT, Department of Media and Communication Studies.
    Deliberation or What?: A Study of Activist Participation on Social Networking Sites2012In: International Journal of Electronic Governance, ISSN 1742-7509, E-ISSN 1742-7517, Vol. 5, no 2, p. 103-115Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper addresses social networking sites (SNSs hereafter) and their promise of deliberation. Based on a (n)ethnograpic inspired case study of middle class activists in southern Stockholm, the question this paper seeks to discuss is whether the activists in my study used SNSs for deliberative purposes or for something else. The aim is to understand and discuss contemporary practices of activist political participation online. In this paper it will be argued that rather than deliberation activists were engaging in practices of online updating. Such practices will be understood in light of late modern theories of reflexivity, identity negotiation and maintenance.

  • 31.
    Svensson, Jakob
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Economic Sciences, Communication and IT, Department of Media and Communication Studies.
    Negotiating the Political Self on Social Media Platforms: An In-Depth Study of Image-Management in an Election-Campaign in a Multi-Party Democracy2012In: JeDEM eJournal of eDemocracy, ISSN 2075-9517, Vol. 4, no 2, p. 183-197Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The elections 2010 were the first in Sweden where social media platforms were used to a large extent by politicians and parties in their campaigns. In this paper we follow the liberal parliamentarian Nina Larsson, who in tandem with traditional election campaigning used social media platforms with the guidance of a local communication agency, Hello Clarice. The paper is theoretically grounded in an understanding of our time as late modern, of social media use as expressive and web campaigning as to large extent revolving around image-management. The research question that will be attended to in this paper is how Nina Larsson used social media platforms in her campaign negotiate the image of herself. The methods used for empirical data-gathering are inspired by (n)ethnography, with both participant observation online and offline, interviews as well as content analyses of Nina's social media postings. Results indicate that she used social media platforms to control her political image, to amplify selected text - texts that often originated in offline/broadcast media – and to negotiate a position within the Liberal Party rather than to deliberate with potential voters

  • 32.
    Svensson, Jakob
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Economic Sciences, Communication and IT, Department of Media and Communication Studies.
    Power and Identity among Citizens in Networked Societies: Towards a Critical Study of Cultural E-Governance2012In: E-Governance and Civic Engagement: Factors and Determinants of E-Democracy / [ed] Aroon Manoharan, Hershey: IGI Global, 2012, p. 109-127Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A classic question within studies of governance, and a key element for understanding the concept of citizenship, concerns what appears to be a paradox of being free and governed at the same time. In this chapter, I will return to this question, but departing from contemporary Western (Scandinavian) society, a society to which I attach labels such as digital, late modern and networked.This is a theoretical chapter addressing political participation, citizenship practices and power.Howdo people enter into citizenship through political participation online and what governs these processes? The contribution to the academic discussion on governance and citizenship is to highlight the expressive as an increasingly important rationale for political participation in networked and digital late modernity. I arrive at this conclusion departing from the intersections between technology, society and culture. In these intersections, expressive processes of identification are key. Therefore citizenship and political participation also need to be approached from an axis of individualism, creating even more intersections when combined with technology, society and culture. 

  • 33.
    Svensson, Jakob
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Economic Sciences, Communication and IT, Department of Media and Communication Studies.
    Relations of Power Within a Field of Contemporary Activism.: Activist Capitals in Network Societies2013In: CeDEM2013 International Conference for E-Democracy and Open Government 2013: Conference for E-Democracy and Open Government / [ed] Peter Parycek & Noella Edelmann, Krems: Donau Universität Krems , 2013, p. 213--228Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 34.
    Svensson, Jakob
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Economic Sciences, Communication and IT, Department of Media and Communication Studies.
    Social Media and the Disciplining of Visibility: Activist Participation and Relations of Power in Network Societies2012In: European Journal of ePractice, ISSN 1988-625X, E-ISSN 1988-625X, Vol. June/July, no 16, p. 16-28Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This  paper  discusses  the  relations  of  power  in  connection with  the  use  of  social  media  among  middle-class  activists  in southern Stockholm. The  method  for  studying  these  activists is   both   ethno-   and   nethnographic,   through   participant observations  and  interviews  both  online  and  offline.  The theoretical  framework  is  based  on  late  modern  theories  of reflexive  identity  negotiation  and  Foucauldian  theories  of visibility  and  power.

    The paper locates relations of power in the constant monitoring, supervision and negotiation of both ones own and others’ identity on social media platforms. This increasing  importance  of  being  updated  in  network  societies will  be  discussed  as  a  form  of  network  logic. 

    Hence, social media usage has not only been about enabling participation of activists in southern Stockholm, but also about disciplining them to be kept updated, which in turn pushes them towards participating in offline activities too.

  • 35.
    Svensson, Jakob
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Economic Sciences, Communication and IT, Department of Media and Communication Studies.
    Klinger, Ulrike
    Universität Zürich.
    The Emergence of a New Media Logic: A Theoretical Approach2013Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 36.
    Svensson, Jakob
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Economic Sciences, Communication and IT, Department of Media and Communication Studies. Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Centre for HumanIT.
    Larsson, Anders
    Oslo Universitet.
    Researching Politicians Online. Identifying Research Directions2013In: CeDEM2013 Krems 22-24 May, 2013: Conference for E-Democracy and Open Government. / [ed] Peter Parycek & Noella Edelmann, Krems, 2013, p. 387-394Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 37.
    Svensson, Jakob
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Economic Sciences, Communication and IT, Department of Media and Communication Studies.
    Larsson, Anders
    Universitetet i Oslo.
    Twitter and the public sphere: Political communication and methodological triangulations in the era of “Big Data”2012Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 38.
    Svensson, Jakob
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Economic Sciences, Communication and IT, Department of Media and Communication Studies.
    Neumayer, Christina
    IT University, Copnehagen.
    Banfield-Mumb, Alexander
    University of Salzburg.
    Shlossbäck, Judith
    What kind of activist are you?: Positioning, power and identity in political online activism in Europe2012In: / [ed] Peter Parycek & Noella Edelman, Krems: Danube-University Krems , 2012, no 0734 434804, p. 165-177Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this article we examine the different forms of activism using information and communication technologies for representation of different political positions. Within the framework of radical democracy (Laclau & Mouffe 1985) we develop a typology of contemporary activism. The results are based on three qualitative case studies of political activism where digital communication played an important role: [1] middle-class activists in Sweden fighting to save their bathhouse; [2] student protests in Austria; and [3] anti-fascist protests in East Germany. 

  • 39.
    Svensson, Jakob
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Economic Sciences, Communication and IT, Department of Media and Communication Studies.
    Poveda, Oriol
    Knowledge without borders.
    Mobile Communication for Development: Formulating Critical Research Questions2012In: Proceedings of M4D 2012 28-29 February 2012 New Delhi, India / [ed] Vikas Kumar & Jakob Svensson, Karlstad: Karlstad University Press, 2012, p. 383-387Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper we take a look at the field of M4D from a Media, Communication/ Sociology perspective. While acknowledging the contribution of mobile communication in improving the lives of people in developing countries, we pose some critical questions for discussion. Following McLuhan, we ask ourselves in which ways mobile communication per se -regardless of its content- is dialectically influencing society and culture. This discussion will lead us to heightening importance of processes of identification through practices of connected- and responsiveness increasingly afforded by mobile communication in late modern societies. If we then take a step back from McLuhan and look at the content, we conclude that such processes of identification are fertile grounds for commercial companies to insert their messages and brands. Out of this discussion we end the paper by formulating some critical research questions.

  • 40.
    Svensson, Jakob
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Economic Sciences, Communication and IT, Department of Media and Communication Studies.
    Wamala, Caroline
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Centrum för genusforskning.
    Towards a Critical Study of Mobile Communication for Development.2013Conference paper (Refereed)
1 - 40 of 40
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