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  • 1.
    Hunter, Aaron W.
    et al.
    Univ Tokyo, Dept Earth & Planetary Sci, Tokyo 1130033, Japan.;Nat Hist Museum, Dept Palaeontol, London SW7 5BD, England..
    Rees, Jan
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Environmental and Life Sciences. Karlstad Univ, Dept Biol, SE-65188 Karlstad, Sweden..
    A new echinoderm faunule from the Lower Jurassic (Pliensbachian) of southern Sweden2010In: Bulletin of the Geological Society of Denmark, ISSN 0011-6297, E-ISSN 2245-7070, Vol. 58, p. 67-73Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In Sweden, Jurassic echinoderms are extremely rare. This present study documents an Early Jurassic echinoderm assemblage collected from a temporary exposure near Helsingborg in Skane, southern Sweden, which includes a previously undescribed species of isocrinid crinoid, Isocrinus ranae sp. nov., and an acrosaleniid echinoid. The Swedish specimens demonstrate that even limited echinoderm material from small exposures can be assigned to a high systematic level and provide data of considerable significance to the evolution of the group as a whole.

  • 2.
    Nylin, Soren
    et al.
    Stockholms universitet.
    Österling, Martin
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Environmental and Life Sciences (from 2013).
    Janz, Niklas
    Stockholms univesitet.
    Embracing Colonizations: A New Paradigm for Species Association Dynamics2018In: Trends in Ecology & Evolution, ISSN 0169-5347, E-ISSN 1872-8383, Vol. 33, no 1, p. 4-14Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Parasitehost and insectplant research have divergent traditions despite the fact that most phytophagous insects live parasitically on their host plants. In parasitology it is a traditional assumption that parasites are typically highly specialized; cospeciation between parasites and hosts is a frequently expressed default expectation. Insectplant theory has been more concerned with host shifts than with cospeciation, and more with hierarchies among hosts than with extreme specialization. We suggest that the divergent assumptions in the respective fields have hidden a fundamental similarity with an important role for potential as well as actual hosts, and hence for host colonizations via ecological fitting. A common research program is proposed which better prepares us for the challenges from introduced species and global change.

  • 3.
    Pekcan-Hekim, Zeynep
    et al.
    University Helsinki, Finland.
    Hellen, Noora
    University Helsinki, Finland.
    Harkonen, Laura
    University Helsinki, Finland.
    Nilsson, Anders
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Environmental and Life Sciences. Lund University.
    Nurminen, Leena
    University Helsinki, Finland.
    Horppila, J
    University Helsinki, Finland.
    Bridge under troubled water: Turbulence and niche partitioning in fish foraging2016In: Ecology and Evolution, ISSN 2045-7758, E-ISSN 2045-7758, Vol. 6, no 24, p. 8919-8930Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The coexistence of competing species relies on niche partitioning. Competitive exclusion is likely inevitable at high niche overlap, but such divide between competitors may be bridged if environmental circumstances displace competitor niches to enhance partitioning. Foraging-niche dimension can be influenced by environmental characteristics, and if competitors react differently to such conditions, coexistence can be facilitated. We here experimentally approach the partitioning effects of environmental conditions by evaluating the influence of water turbulence on foraging-niche responses in two competing fish species, Eurasian perch Perca fluviatilis and roach Rutilus rutilus, selecting from planktonic and benthic prey. In the absence of turbulence, both fish species showed high selectivity for benthic chironomid larvae. R. rutilus fed almost exclusively on zoobenthos, whereas P. fluviatilis complemented the benthic diet with zooplankton (mainly copepods). In turbulent water, on the other hand, the foraging-niche widths of both R. rutilus and P. fluviatilis increased, while their diet overlap simultaneously decreased, caused by 20% of the R. rutilus individuals turning to planktonic (mainly bosminids) prey, and by P. fluviatilis increasing foraging on littoral/benthic food sources. We show that moderate physical disturbance of environments, such as turbulence, can enhance niche partitioning and thereby coexistence of competing foragers. Turbulence affects prey but not fish swimming capacities, with consequences for prey-specific distributions and encounter rates with fish of different foraging strategies (pause-travel P. fluviatilis and cruise R. rutilus). Water turbulence and prey community structure should hereby affect competitive interaction strengths among fish species, with consequences for coexistence probability as well as community and system compositions.

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