Change search
Refine search result
1 - 17 of 17
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • apa.csl
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1.
    Adams, Paul C.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Department of Geography, Media and Communication (from 2013). University of Texas at Austin, USA.
    Geographies of media and communication II: Arcs of communication2018In: Progress in Human Geography, ISSN 0309-1325, E-ISSN 1477-0288, Vol. 42, no 4, p. 590-599Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Some of the most perceptive contributions to the geographic study of media and communication have been in areas of landscapes studies and geohumanities. To bring landscape and geohumanities insights together more explicitly with communication and media, this progress report draws on George Revill’s concept of an ‘arc of sound’, expanding the concept’s scope to an arc of communication – a dynamic trajectory connecting one vantage point to another through various translations and shifts. It is a mix of integration and translation that forms its own space, place and time, integrating elements of embodied performance, multiple sensory modalities, temporality, absence and excess. Arcs of communication often depend on collaboration and can produce transformations of identity. The concept of the arc of communication enables discovery of numerous threads connecting landscape studies to geohumanities while deepening geographical understandings of media and communication.

  • 2.
    Beck, Michael Till
    et al.
    Ludwig Maximilian University of Munich.
    Fischer, Andreas
    University of Passau.
    Kokot, Fabian
    University of Passau.
    Linnhoff-Popien, Claudia
    Ludwig Maximilian University of Munich.
    De Meer, Hermann
    University of Passau.
    A Simulation Framework for Virtual Network Embedding Algorithms2014In: 16th International Telecommunications Network Strategy and Planning Symposium (Networks), New York: IEEE, 2014, p. 1-6Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Network virtualization is seen as an enabling technology for the Future Internet. In this context, many Virtual Network Embedding algorithms have been introduced in literature so far. This paper discusses an open source framework for the evaluation of such algorithms. The paper describes features provided by the framework, how to use the framework for evaluating these algorithms, and how to extend the software with respect to novel algorithms and simulation scenarios. Lessons learned are presented, describing how the software evolved towards a mature and highly extensible simulation framework.

  • 3.
    Durl, James
    et al.
    Griffith University, Australia.
    Trischler, Jakob
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Service Research Center (from 2013).
    Dietrich, Timo
    Griffith University, Australia.
    Co-designing with young consumers: Reflections, challenges and benefits2017In: Young Consumers, ISSN 1747-3616, E-ISSN 1758-7212, Vol. 18, no 4, p. 439-455Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose - This paper aims to explore co-design as a method for actively involving young consumers in the design of an alcohol education program that utilizes an interactive Virtual Reality (VR) component. Design/methodology/approach - Dietrich et al. (2017) six-step framework was applied to a co-design project involving four groups of 14- to 16-year-old Australian high school students. Data collection included observations by three facilitators, written feedback from members of each group and video presentations of the generated ideas. The data analysis focused on investigating the applicability of the six-step framework to young consumers and evaluating the quality and practicality of the generated ideas. Findings - Sensitization is key to enabling young consumers to become equal participants during the co-design process. Sensitization allowed the participants to engage in the design task in a playful manner, which fostered active participation and creative insights during the co-design session. A team approach based on interactivity and group autonomy enabled adolescents to contribute insights into their specific needs and wants. This was complemented by a trusting environment and the presence of immediately available yet "hands off" facilitators. Research limitations/implications - The findings are limited to one specific sample and design task. Future research is required that investigates co-design with young consumers in different contexts. Practical implications - This paper provides guidance for the application of co-design with young consumers by highlighting the importance of sensitization and facilitation. Originality/value - This study marks one of the first approaches to co-designing alcohol education programs, including VR components, with young consumers. The findings contribute to a better understanding of the consequences of involving young consumers through co-design.

  • 4.
    Fast, Karin
    University of Oslo, Norway.
    The disconnection turn: Three facets of disconnective work in post-digital capitalism2021In: Convergence. The International Journal of Research into New Media Technologies, ISSN 1354-8565, E-ISSN 1748-7382, Vol. 27, no 6, p. 1615-1630Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In post-digital capitalism, digital disconnection is not merely a “luxury” but also an obligation. Aiming to re-contextualize digital disconnection outside of digital detox resorts, social media, and elitist activism, this article asks how the ongoing disconnection turn affects how we (think about) work. With cues taken from digital disconnection studies and (digital) work/labour research, I inquire three facets of disconnective work. I elaborate, firstly, what disconnection might mean for work, as I scrutinize ideals pertaining to “deep” and “slow” work. Secondly, I unveil how disconnection may materialize at work, as I inspect “the post-digital workplace” and “disconnective technologies of work.” Thirdly, using “The Post-Digital Housewife” as a rhetorical figure for grasping the daily, typically unpaid, work that the disconnection turn makes acute, I recognize disconnection as work. The article concludes by presenting four dialectics of disconnective work, which serve to remind us of the paradoxical role of disconnection in processes of empowerment and exploitation.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 5.
    Ferrer Conill, Raul
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Department of Geography, Media and Communication.
    Boundaries of Journalism: Professionalism, practices and participation2016In: Digital Journalism, ISSN 2167-0811, E-ISSN 2167-082X, Vol. 4, no 3, p. 401-403Article, book review (Refereed)
  • 6.
    Ferrer Conill, Raul
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Department of Geography, Media and Communication (from 2013).
    Camouflaging church as state: A study of journalism’s native advertising2015Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The conflicting powers that drive journalism are entangled within tensions between commercial and professional logics, trying to dictate the future of the trade. The professional logic, which regards audiences as citizens, is the driving force that nurtures the civic and ideal-typical values properties of journalism. The commercial logic, which regards audiences as consumers, addresses the fact that most news outlets are subjected to commercial urges in order to sustain the organization. Traditionally, the journalistic ideals have aimed to keeping editorial lines independent from commercial influences. This has been historically known as the separation of church and state.This paper examines the increasing trend of adopting native advertising in the digital fronts of traditional news media outlets. Native advertising defined here as a form of paid media where the commercial content is delivered within the design and form of editorial content with the attempt to recreate the user experience of reading news instead of advertising content. Methodologically, this study looks at news websites of 12 legacy newspapers from Sweden, Spain, the UK, and the USA, and analyses the adoption of native advertising during the span of a month. Subsequently, these advertisements are analyzed in terms of content, format, and the degree of transparency when linking each piece to the marketer who pays for the ad.Native advertising delivers commercial advertising as if it was real news. If this practice proves to be a lucrative one in the long term, the new commercial journalism might be based on camouflaging church as state.

  • 7.
    Ferrer Conill, Raul
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Economic Sciences, Communication and IT, Department of Information Systems and Project Management.
    The gamification of news: Towards a new framework for researching game mechanics in journalism2014Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The traditional newspaper is declining and journalism has embraced digital media in its struggle to survive. New models of delivering news to the public are being explored in order to increase the levels of readership and user engagement.

    This paper introduces a new framework for researching the application of gamification techniques in journalism. Gamification, defined here as the use of game thinking and game mechanics in non-gaming environments, adds a layer of game elements for the main purpose of improving user engagement. The proposed framework will allow for a simple analysis of news websites in the search of gamified elements. The concept of gamification is deconstructed into elements that can be introduced on top of an online news service. These elements are placed in three different categories: dynamics, which relate to the narrative and purpose of the gamified layer, providing the system with a sense of direction; mechanics, which relate to the processes aimed to create engagement and the strategies aimed to provide the system with momentum; and components, which relate to the visible game elements embedded in the system aimed to create flows of interaction with the readers. These elements are then evaluated in terms of level of playfulness and the underlying intention of implementation, whether it is to motivate readership, participation, or to broaden the level of knowledge of the reader.

    Gamification has shown to be an effective method to attract the attention and engagement of users in various domains, and it has been slowly implemented in digital journalism as an attempt to increase the number of readers, by stimulating the intrinsic motivation, and creating and/or maintaining the habit of consuming news in the audience. It has the potential to affect the way journalists write the news, to shift the topics that are introduced in the production pipeline, as well as to shape new patterns of consumption.  However, current research on the intersecting points between gamification and news is practically non-existent. This papers aims to contribute to this new area of research within journalism studies and to suggest some tools to analyze and understand the new iteration of digital journalism.

    Theoretically, this paper focuses on the motivational aspects of games and discusses the approaches on which they can be incorporated in the distribution channels of digital news. Finally, it analyzes some of the current examples of gamified digital newspapers and discusses why certain mechanics, such as unlocking content, progression, status, and the social graph are particularly suited to journalism, and to tap into the emotional drive of the emerging mobile audience.

  • 8.
    Ferrer Conill, Raul
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Department of Geography, Media and Communication.
    Karlsson, Michael
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Department of Geography, Media and Communication.
    The Gamification of Journalism2015In: Emerging Research and Trends in Gamification / [ed] Harsha Gangadharbatla & Donna Z. Davis, Hershey, PA: IGI Global, 2015, p. 356-383Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Traditional news outlets are on the decline and journalism has embraced digital media in its struggle tosurvive. New models of delivering news to the public are being explored in order to increase the levelsof readership and user engagement.The narrative of this chapter focuses on the future of journalismand media, and the potential benefits and dangers of gamifying journalism. Since gamification is a newtrend, a thorough look at the intersection between the enhancements of public mobility, the digitalizationof news services, and the engagement of gamified systems can bring better understanding of futurechannels of reading news to the users, to researchers, and to the industry. This chapter aims to bridgethe gap between gamification as an emerging practice in news distribution and yet a vastly unchartedarea or research.

  • 9.
    Fischer, Andreas
    et al.
    University of Passau.
    Botero, Juan Felipe
    Universitat Politècnica de Catalunya.
    Beck, Michael Till
    University of Passau.
    De Meer, Hermann
    University of Passau.
    Hesselbach, Xavier
    Universitat Politècnica de Catalunya.
    Virtual Network Embedding: A Survey2013In: IEEE Communications Surveys and Tutorials, ISSN 1553-877X, E-ISSN 1553-877X, Vol. 15, no 4, p. 1888-1906Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Network virtualization is recognized as an enabling technology for the future Internet. It aims to overcome the resistance of the current Internet to architectural change. Application of this technology relies on algorithms that can instantiate virtualized networks on a substrate infrastructure, optimizing the layout for service-relevant metrics. This class of algorithms is commonly known as “Virtual Network Embedding (VNE)” algorithms. This paper presents a survey of current research in the VNE area. Based upon a novel classification scheme for VNE algorithms a taxonomy of current approaches to the VNE problem is provided and opportunities for further research are discussed.

  • 10.
    Fischer, Andreas
    et al.
    University of Passau.
    Botero, Juan Felipe
    Universitat Politècnica de Catalunya.
    Duelli, Michael
    University of Wuerzburg.
    Schlosser, Daniel
    University of Wuerzburg.
    Hesselbach, Xavier
    Universitat Politècnica de Catalunya.
    De Meer, Hermann
    University of Passau.
    ALEVIN - A Framework to Develop, Compare, and Analyze Virtual Network Embedding Algorithms2011In: Electronic Communications of the EASST, E-ISSN 1863-2122, Vol. 37, p. 1-12Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Network virtualization is recognized as an enabling technology for the Future Internet. Applying virtualization of network resources leads to the problem of mapping virtual resources to physical resources, known as “Virtual Network Embedding” (VNE). Several algorithms attempting to solve this problem have been discussed in the literature, so far. However, comparison of VNE algorithms is hard, as each algorithm focuses on different criteria. To that end, we introduce a framework to compare different algorithms according to a set of metrics, which allow to evaluate the algorithms and compute their results on a given scenario for arbitrary parameters.

  • 11.
    Handler, Reinhard
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Department of Geography, Media and Communication (from 2013).
    Ferrer Conill, Raul
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Department of Geography, Media and Communication (from 2013).
    Open Data, Crowdsourcing and Game Mechanics: A case study on civic participation in the digital age2016In: Computer Supported Cooperative Work: The Journal of Collaborative Computing and Work Practices, ISSN 0925-9724, E-ISSN 1573-7551, Vol. 25, no 2-3, p. 153-166Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this paper is to shed light on the dynamics of civic participation, media agency, anddata practices. To do so we analyse an investigative journalism story run by The Guardian that combinedopen data, crowdsourcing and game mechanics with the purpose of engaging readers. The case studyhighlights how data can be made accessible to people who usually do not have access; how game mechanicscan be deployed in order to foster civic participation by offering users a sense of autonomy, competence andrelatedness; and how crowdsourcing can organise a large group of people into achieving a common goal. Thecombination of these three elements resulted in a case for civic participation in the digital era.

  • 12.
    Maurer, Peter
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Department of Geography, Media and Communication (from 2013).
    Perceptions of media influence and performance among politicians in European democracies2023In: International Communication Gazette, ISSN 1748-0485, E-ISSN 1748-0493, Vol. 85, no 5, p. 347-364Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study explores politicians' subjective views of the mediatisation of politics and the implication it has for their satisfaction with democracy. Based on previous research, we hypothesise a negative effect of their perception of media influence on their evaluation of the news media's performance as a public informant. These perceptions directly and indirectly influence politicians' satisfaction with democracy. The relationships were tested with a Structural Equation Model (SEM) based on comparative survey data from politicians in seven democracies (Austria, Denmark, France, Germany, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland). Results show that a strong influence runs from politicians' perception of the media's performance as regards public information to their satisfaction with the functioning of democracy. This influence is stable across countries. The SEM thus may provide a good explanation for why some politicians attack legacy media and excessively use social media to communicate with voters. Results also point to risks of media-driven democracies.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 13.
    Murmann, Patrick
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Mathematics and Computer Science (from 2013).
    Towards Usable Transparency via Individualisation2019Licentiate thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The General Data Protection Regulation grants data subjects the legal rights of transparency and intervenability. Ex post transparency provides users of data services with insight into how their personal data have been processed, and potentially clarifies what consequences will or may arise due to the processing of their data. Technological artefacts, ex post transparency-enhancing tools (TETs) convey such information to data subjects, provided the TETs are designed to suit the predisposition of their audience. Despite being a prerequisite for transparency, however, many of the TETs available to date lack usability in that their capabilities do not reflect the needs of their final users.

    The objective of this thesis is therefore to systematically apply the concept of human-centred design to ascertain design principles that demonstrably lead to the implementation of a TET that facilitates ex post transparency and supports intervenability. To this end, we classify the state of the art of usable ex post TETs published in the literature and discuss the gaps therein. Contextualising our findings in the domain of fitness tracking, we investigate to what extent individualisation can help accommodate the needs of users of online mobile health services. We introduce the notion of privacy notifications as a means to inform data subjects about incidences worthy of their attention and examine how far privacy personas reflect the preferences of distinctive groups of recipients. We suggest a catalogue of design guidelines that can serve as a basis for specifying context-sensitive requirements for the implementation of a TET that leverages privacy notifications to facilitate ex post transparency, and which also serve as criteria for the evaluation of a future prototype.

    Download full text (pdf)
    Kappa_Murmann
    Download (jpg)
    cover
  • 14.
    Rubio-Loyola, Javier
    et al.
    CINVESTAV Tamaulipas.
    Astorga, Antonio
    Universitat Politècnica de Catalunya.
    Serrat, Joan
    Universitat Politècnica de Catalunya.
    Lefevre, Laurent
    INRIA Lyon.
    Cheniour, Abderhaman
    INRIA Lyon.
    Muldowney, David
    Waterford Institute of Technology.
    Davy, Steven
    Waterford Institute of Technology1.
    Galis, Alex
    University College London.
    Mamatas, Lefteris
    University College London.
    Clayman, Stuart
    University College London.
    Macedo, Daniel
    LIP6.
    Movahedi, Zeinab
    LIP6.
    Pujolle, Guy
    LIP6.
    Fischer, Andreas
    University of Passau.
    De Meer, Hermann
    University of Passau.
    Managability of Future Internet Networks from a Practical Viewpoint2010In: Towards the Future Internet - Emerging Trends from European Research / [ed] Tselentis, Georgios; Galis, Alex; Gavras, Anastasius; Krco, Srdjan; Lotz, Volkmar; Simperl, Elena; Stiller, Burkhard; Zahariadis, Theodore, IOS Press, 2010, Vol. 0, p. 105-114Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Autonomic Internet project [1] approach relies on abstractions and distributed systems of a five plane solution for the provision of Future Internet Services (OSKMV): Orchestration, Service Enablers, Knowledge, Management and Virtualisation Planes. This paper presents a practical viewpoint of the manageability of virtual networks, exercising the components and systems that integrate this approach and that are being validated. This paper positions the distributed systems and networking services that integrate this solution, focusing on the provision of Future Internet services for self-configuration and selfperformance management scenes.

  • 15.
    Taghinezhad-Niar, Ahmad
    et al.
    University of Tabriz, Iran.
    Taheri, Javid
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Mathematics and Computer Science (from 2013).
    Reliability, Rental-Cost and Energy-Aware Multi-Workflow Scheduling on Multi-Cloud Systems2023In: IEEE Transactions on Cloud Computing, ISSN 2168-7161, Vol. 11, no 3, p. 2681-2692Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Computationally intensive applications with a wide range of requirements are advancing to cloud computing platforms. However, with the growing demands from users, cloud providers are not always able to provide all the prerequisites of the application. Hence, flexible computation and storage systems, such as multi-cloud systems, emerged as a suitable solution. Different charging mechanisms, vast resource configuration, different energy consumption, and reliability are the key issues for multi-cloud systems. To address these issues, we propose a multi-workflow scheduling framework for multi-cloud systems, intending to lower the monetary cost and energy consumption while enhancing the reliability of application execution. Our proposed platform presents different methods (utilizing resource gaps, the DVFS utilized method, and a task duplication mechanism) to ensure each application's requirement. The Weibull distribution is used to model task reliability at different resource fault rates and fault behavior. Various synthetic workflow applications are used to perform simulation experiments. The results of the performance evaluation demonstrated that our proposed algorithms outperform (in the terms of resource rental cost, efficient energy consumption, and improved reliability) state-of-the-art algorithms for multi-cloud systems.

  • 16.
    Wheatley, Dawn
    et al.
    Dublin City Univ, IRL.
    Ferrer Conill, Raul
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Department of Geography, Media and Communication (from 2013). University Stavanger, NOR.
    The Temporal Nature of Mobile Push Notification Alerts: A Study of European News Outlets' Dissemination Patterns2021In: Digital Journalism, ISSN 2167-0811, E-ISSN 2167-082X, Vol. 9, no 6, p. 694-714Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Push notifications provide news outlets with direct access to audiences amid concerns around information overload, disinformation, and heightened competition for reader attention. Such news distribution is relevant because it (a) bypasses social media and news aggregators, reaching readers directly; (b) alters the agency and control of temporal news personalisation; and (c) reinforces mobile as the locus of contact between news organisations and audiences. However, push notifications are a relatively under-researched topic. We explore news organisations' use of alerts, considering whether they attempt to integrate with existing mobile-user behaviour patterns or seek to be a disruptive element, garnering attention when audiences are not typically using devices. Through quantitative content analysis, this study examines the temporality of push notifications (n = 7092) from nine Northwestern European countries, comprising 34 news outlets. These data allow for comparisons at two levels: publisher type and national context. The study shows how the temporal patterns of push notifications' dissemination align with existing news consumption behaviours; concepts of content-snacking and audiences' rhythms and rituals are a useful lens through which these immediate, concise texts can be considered. Our findings show that news organisations use the mobile channel for attracting and maintaining users' attention, with varying interpretations of temporal customisability.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 17.
    Unander-Scharin, Carl
    Kungliga tekniska högskolan, Sverige.
    Unander-Scharin, Åsa
    Luleå tekniska universitet, Sverige.
    Swanlake Revisited: An Interactive Exhibition2012Artistic output (Refereed)
    Abstract [sv]

    Under Oktober förvandlas Dansmuseets underjordiska rum till en mytopoetisk sjö där besökarens närvaro får märkliga svanvarelser att dyka upp och försvinna bland virtuella vågor. I Swanlake Revisited återbesöker vi den urgamla legenden om knölsvanen som lever sitt livi stumhet, men som vid dödsögonblicket en enda gång utbrister i oerhört vacker sång. 

1 - 17 of 17
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • apa.csl
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf