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Customer Complaint Behaviour in Service
Karlstad University, Faculty of Economic Sciences, Communication and IT, Service Research Center.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-5605-9285
2008 (English)Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other scientific)
Abstract [en]

It is vital for every service provider to get feedback from its customers.

This is especially important when a customer has perceived an unfavourable service experience. One way to receive feedback from these customers is to encourage and make it easy for them to complain.

Scholarly knowledge about complaint behaviour gives the service provider valuable insight about service problems and how to improve e.g. service offerings, service processes and interactions, to increase customer satisfaction, loyalty and profit. For that reason it is argued that customers who have an unfavourable service experience should be encouraged to complain, because if not, the provider risks losing the customer and thus future revenue.

Previous research within complaint behaviour has mainly focused on the static description of motivation, antecedents, or the outcome response of complaint behaviour. The research has mainly explored different features linked to the market, the provider, the service and/or individual customer’s issues. To learn more about the customer’s complaint behaviour there is a need to take a dynamic and processual approach. This may help providers to serve customers more correctly and prevent unfavourable service experiences.

The main aim of this dissertation is to enhance the knowledge of the dynamic behavioural processes in customer complaint behaviour. The dissertation will contribute to conceptualise different aspects of customer complaint behaviour. In addition, the dissertation will give an empirical grounded understanding of contextual and emotional aspects that may help to recognize the complexity of the complaint behaviour process.

The contribution is a portrayal of different models describing the dynamic process of complaint behaviour including a new customer complaint behaviour model. Customer complaint behaviour is viewed as action and reaction - as a dynamic adjustment process that occurs during and/or after the service interaction, rather as a post-purchase activity. In order to capture these adjustments, a new conceptual complaint model is suggested which holds three thresholds for complaint behaviour and emphasis three different behavioural categories in the complaint process. Further, the dissertation gives an explanation of contextual and emotional issues that influence the complaint behaviour. The dissertation also includes an epistemological framework to anchor the paradigmatic belongings of service research as a basis for the design of studies in the area of customer complaint behaviour.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Karlstad: Karlstads universitet, 2008. , p. 108
Series
Karlstad University Studies, ISSN 1403-8099 ; 2008:14
Keywords [en]
Customer complaint behaviour, complaint, dynamic, process
National Category
Business Administration
Research subject
Business Administration
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:kau:diva-1625ISBN: 978-91-7063-172-6 (print)OAI: oai:DiVA.org:kau-1625DiVA, id: diva2:5576
Public defence
2008-06-09, Agardhsalen, 11D 257, Karlstads universitet, 13:00
Opponent
Supervisors
Available from: 2008-05-21 Created: 2008-05-21 Last updated: 2015-01-29
List of papers
1. Complainer Characteristics When Exit is Closed
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Complainer Characteristics When Exit is Closed
2007 (English)In: International Journal of Service Industry Management, ISSN 0956-4233, Vol. 18, no 1, p. 25-51Article in journal (Refereed) Published
National Category
Business Administration
Research subject
Business Administration
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kau:diva-2038 (URN)10.1108/09564230710732885 (DOI)
Available from: 2008-05-21 Created: 2008-05-21 Last updated: 2019-07-02Bibliographically approved
2. Paradigms in service research
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Paradigms in service research
2011 (English)In: Journal of Service Management, ISSN 1757-5818, E-ISSN 1757-5826, Vol. 22, no 5, p. 560-585Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Purpose – Recent discussions of the service-dominant logic (S-D logic) and the creation of a multidisciplinary service science highlight the need for a paradigmatic discussion that provides directions for ongoing service research. This article aims to examine different epistemological foundations and proposes a framework to describe and better understand the development and future of service research.

Design/methodology/approach – Using the proposed framework, an assessment of 60 selected award-winning and most cited articles is categorized using the paradigmatic framework.

Findings – Four paradigms are found to be prominent in service research: positivistic, hermeneutic, dialogic, and monologic. The positivistic option has been the dominant paradigm employed by service scholars, suggesting service scholars need to apply the three alternative paradigms more as a means to enrich and extend the service research discipline.

Research limitations/implications – There is a need to discuss the fundamental beliefs and worldviews (ontological and epistemological positions) guiding service research. Paradigms are critical determinants and drivers of good research.

Originality/value – A new framework for analyzing paradigmatic foundations in service research and directions for the future design of service research studies is proposed. The suggested framework could inspire scholars to reflect on their ontological and epistemological foundations and provide paradigmatic guidance within service research. This provides a basis for continuous expansion of the service research field.

Keywords
Service research, Paradigm, Ontology, Epistemology, Methodology, Classification
National Category
Business Administration
Research subject
Business Administration
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kau:diva-2039 (URN)10.1108/09564231111174951 (DOI)000297598900001 ()
Available from: 2008-05-21 Created: 2008-05-21 Last updated: 2017-12-07Bibliographically approved
3. Customer complaint behaviour from the perspective of the service-dominant logic of marketing
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Customer complaint behaviour from the perspective of the service-dominant logic of marketing
2007 (English)In: Managing Service Quality, ISSN 0960-4529, Vol. 17, no 6, p. 601-620Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kau:diva-2040 (URN)10.1108/09604520710834966 (DOI)
Available from: 2008-05-21 Created: 2008-05-21 Last updated: 2010-08-11Bibliographically approved
4. A Dynamic Model of Customer Complaining Behaviour from the Perspective of Service-Dominant Logic
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A Dynamic Model of Customer Complaining Behaviour from the Perspective of Service-Dominant Logic
2012 (English)In: European Journal of Marketing, ISSN 0309-0566, E-ISSN 1758-7123, Vol. 46, no 1/2, p. 284-305Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Purpose - The purpose of this paper is to propose a conceptual model of customer complaining behaviour as a dynamic process in accordance with the service-dominant logic perspective of marketing.

Design/methodology/approach - The study reviews the common behaviour models of customer complaints and relates this to the service-dominant logic perspective in order to develop and describe a dynamic conceptual model of customer complaining behaviour.

Findings - The proposed model posits three categories of complaining behaviour due to a customer’s unfavourable service experience: (i) no complaining response, (ii) communication complaining responses and (iii) action complaining responses.

Research limitations/implications - Empirical validation of the proposed conceptual model is needed.

Practical implications - The proposed model can be used by managers to understand the various behaviour responses of customer complaints that the company experiences. In addition, the model assists in framing appropriate managerial responses, including service recovery and improved service design.

Originality/value - The study represents a thorough conceptual examination of the complaint process and proposes a dynamic model of customer complaining behaviour based on the service-dominant logic perspective.

Keywords
Customer complaining behaviour; Complaint process, Service-dominant logic of marketing, Communication complaint responses, Action complaint responses, Customers, Customer satisfaction, Complaints, Logic
National Category
Business Administration
Research subject
Business Administration
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kau:diva-2041 (URN)10.1108/03090561211189338 (DOI)000302198200014 ()
Available from: 2008-05-21 Created: 2008-05-21 Last updated: 2017-08-08Bibliographically approved
5. Negative emotions and their effect on customer complaint behaviour
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Negative emotions and their effect on customer complaint behaviour
2011 (English)In: Journal of Service Management, ISSN 1757-5818, E-ISSN 1757-5826, Vol. 22, no 1, p. 111-134Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Purpose – This study aims to investigate pre-complaint situations and has a threefold purpose: to identify a set of negative emotions experienced in unfavourable service experiences, to examine the patterns of these negative emotions and to link these negative emotions to complaint behaviour.

Design/methodology/approach – To fulfil the threefold purpose previously outlined, the study uses a combination of qualitative and quantitative methodologies. A critical incident technique is applied. The empirical data are derived from 25 in-depth interviews and the results of a questionnaire survey of 3,104 respondents.

Findings – A total of 20 observed negative emotions are reduced to a second-order construct with five latent categories of negative emotions: shame, sadness, fear, anger and frustration. These categories coincide with three categories of negative emotions in the agency dimension: other-attributed, self-attributed and situational-attributed. The study finds that the negative emotion of frustration is the best predictor for complaint behaviour towards the service provider.

Research limitations/implications – The results are limited by the fact that the data are entirely self-reported. Moreover, the generalisabilty of the results is limited by the fact that the findings relate to one service industry in one country.

Originality/value – The study provides a comprehensive conceptual understanding of both pre-complaint negative emotions and how these emotions affect customer complaint behaviour.

Keywords
Emotional dissonance, Complaints, Consumer behaviour
National Category
Business Administration
Research subject
Business Administration
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kau:diva-2042 (URN)10.1108/09564231111106947 (DOI)000289586400006 ()
Available from: 2008-05-21 Created: 2008-05-21 Last updated: 2017-12-07Bibliographically approved

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