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Injury risks in schoolchildren with attention-deficit/hyperactivity or autismspectrumdisorder: Results from two school-based health surveys of 6- to 17-year-old children in Sweden
Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Environmental and Life Sciences. (Centrum för Personsäkerhet)ORCID iD: 0000-0002-1189-9950
Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013).ORCID iD: 0000-0002-7872-5808
Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Health Sciences.
Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Health Sciences.
2016 (Swedish)In: Journal of Safety Research, ISSN 0022-4375, E-ISSN 1879-1247, Vol. 58, p. 49-56Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Introduction: Injuries are one of the leading causes of death and disability among children in Sweden and attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) has previously been associated with an increased risk of injury in pediatric populations elsewhere in the world. Current evidence regarding the possible link between autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and injury risk appears limited, even though some potentially risk-increasing symptoms overlap. The purpose of this study was thus to study the association between both ADHD and ASD concerning the risk of injury among Swedish schoolchildren. Methods: Two samples were used: a population based register study containing data from 18,416 children ranging from the ages of 6-17 years collected by school nurses during 2012/2014 (Survey A), and a national cross-sectional study of 3202 ninth-grade children (similar to 15 years old) collected from 92 schools in 2011 (Survey B). The data were analyzed using chi(2)-tests and log binomial generalized linear models to obtain risk ratios (RR), comparing cases reportedly affected by ADHD or ASD to unaffected controls. Results: After adjusting for confounders, ADHD was associated with a 65% increased risk of injury (RR 1.65 [95% CI: 132-2.05] in Survey A, and a 57% increased risk of injury (RR 1.57 [95% CI: 1.27-1.95]) in Survey B. ASD was not significantly associated with any differences in injury risk (RR 0.81 [95% CI: 0.57-1.14]). Conclusions: The results indicate that there is an elevated injury risk among Swedish schoolchildren with ADHD but not for children with ASD. Future studies should focus on causal mechanisms mediating the association between ADHD and injuries in order to facilitate injury prevention strategies. Practical applications: Parents and teachers of schoolchildren with ADHD should be made aware of the elevated injury risks associated with the diagnosis. Safety experts and injury control professionals should consider the development of specialized prevention strategies in order to reduce these risks.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2016. Vol. 58, p. 49-56
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Research subject
Public Health Science; Risk and Environmental Studies
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:kau:diva-45529DOI: 10.1016/j.jsr.2016.06.004ISI: 000383934100006OAI: oai:DiVA.org:kau-45529DiVA, id: diva2:956649
Available from: 2016-08-31 Created: 2016-08-31 Last updated: 2017-11-21Bibliographically approved

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Bonander, CarlBeckman, LindaJanson, StaffanJernbro, Carolina
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