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The Migratory Behaviour and Fallback Rate of Landlocked Atlantic Salmon (Salmo salar) in a Regulated River: does Timing Matter?
Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Environmental and Life Sciences.
Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Environmental and Life Sciences.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-8738-8815
Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Environmental and Life Sciences. (Naturresurs rinnande vatten)ORCID iD: 0000-0002-3191-7140
Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Environmental and Life Sciences.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-3098-0594
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2016 (English)In: Rivers Research and Applications: an international journal devoted to river research and management, ISSN 1535-1459, E-ISSN 1535-1467, Vol. 32, no 6, 1402-1409 p.Article in journal (Refereed) PublishedText
Abstract [en]

The behavior of early (June-July) and late (August-September) migrating, adult Atlantic salmon, in The River Klaralven, Sweden, was analyzed using radio telemetry. River Klaralven is a regulated river without functioning fishways, instead upstream migrating salmon are trapped and trucked past eight hydropower plants before released back to the river. We distinguished two parts of the spawning migration, that is, one part being the migration from the place where the fish was released to the spawning grounds. The other part was a holding phase on the spawning grounds with little or no movements before spawning. The late salmon spent less of their total time on holding, 36.2%, and more on migration, 63.8%, compared with early migrating salmon, which distributed their time rather evenly between migration, 47.5%, and holding, 52.5%. In total, early salmon used 30% more time migrating and 156% more time holding than late salmon. Some Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar) fell back over the hydropower plant after release and got excluded from spawning. The fallback rates of transported, tagged spawners were higher in the early than in the late group in both years. The fallback rate in 2012 was 42.8% of the early group and 15.1% in the late. In 2013, there were 51.7 % fallbacks in the early group and 3.4% in the late. The salmon fell back on average 9days after being released in 2012 and 16days in 2013. A high mean daily discharge on the day of release increased the probability of becoming a fallback. Copyright (c) 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
John Wiley & Sons, 2016. Vol. 32, no 6, 1402-1409 p.
Keyword [en]
Atlantic Salmon, upstream migration, fallback, spawning, behaviour, timing
National Category
Biological Sciences
Research subject
Biology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:kau:diva-44678DOI: 10.1002/rra.3007ISI: 000379952900023OAI: oai:DiVA.org:kau-44678DiVA: diva2:952229
Available from: 2016-08-12 Created: 2016-08-12 Last updated: 2016-10-31Bibliographically approved

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Hagelin, AnnaCalles, OlleGreenberg, LarryNyqvist, DanielBergman, Eva
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Department of Environmental and Life Sciences
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Rivers Research and Applications: an international journal devoted to river research and management
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