Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Bisphenol A exposure may increase the risk of development of atopic disorders in children
Taipei Hosp, Minist Hlth & Welf, Dept Pediat, Taipei, Taiwan.;Natl Yang Ming Univ, Coll Med, Inst Environm & Occupat Hlth Sci, Taipei 112, Taiwan.;China Med Univ, Dept Hlth Risk Management, Taichung, Taiwan..
Natl Taiwan Univ, Coll Publ Hlth, Inst Environm Hlth, Taipei 10764, Taiwan..
Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Health Sciences.ORCID iD: 0000-0003-0417-1686
2016 (English)In: International journal of hygiene and environmental health (Print), ISSN 1438-4639, E-ISSN 1618-131X, Vol. 219, no 3, p. 311-316Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Resource type
Text
Abstract [en]

Background: Little is known about the effect of Bisphenol A (BPA) on atopic disorders. Objective: To investigated the associations (i) between postnatal BPA exposure and allergic diseases in children; (ii) between BPA and IgE levels for the possible disease pathogenesis; and (iii) gender-based differences. Methods: A total of 453 children from Childhood Environment and Allergic Diseases Study cohort with urine and blood samples were recruited in Taiwan. Urinary BPA glucoronide (BPAG) levels were measured by UPLC-MS/MS at ages 3 and 6 years. The associations between BPAG levels at different ages and IgE levels and the development of allergic diseases were evaluated by multivariate linear regression and logistic regression. A mediation analysis was also conducted to evaluate how much risk of allergic diseases in relation to BPA exposure is explained by IgE changes. Results: The BPAG levels at age 3 were positively associated with IgE levels at age 3 (beta = 64.85 kU/l per In-unit increase BPAG level; 95% Cl, 14.59-115.11 kU/l). Stratified by gender, BPAG levels at age 3 were positively associated with IgE levels at age 3, particularly in girls (beta = 139.23 kW; 95% Cl, 57.38-221.09 kU/l). Similar results were also found at age 6. Urinary BPAG levels at age 3 were significantly associated with asthma at ages 3 and 6, with OR (95%CI) of 1.29(1.08-1.55) and 1.27(1.04-1.55). We estimated that 70% of the total effect of BPA exposure on asthma is mediated by IgE levels. Conclusions: BPA exposures were associated with IgE levels and may increase the risk of development of allergic diseases in children particularly in girls.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2016. Vol. 219, no 3, p. 311-316
Keywords [en]
Allergic diseases, Bisphenol A, Children, Gender, IgE levels
National Category
Health Sciences
Research subject
Public Health Science
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:kau:diva-42051DOI: 10.1016/j.ijheh.2015.12.001ISI: 000374198800010PubMedID: 26765087OAI: oai:DiVA.org:kau-42051DiVA, id: diva2:929447
Available from: 2016-05-18 Created: 2016-05-18 Last updated: 2017-12-06Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

No full text in DiVA

Other links

Publisher's full textPubMed

Authority records BETA

Bornehag, Carl-Gustaf

Search in DiVA

By author/editor
Bornehag, Carl-Gustaf
By organisation
Department of Health Sciences
In the same journal
International journal of hygiene and environmental health (Print)
Health Sciences

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar

doi
pubmed
urn-nbn

Altmetric score

doi
pubmed
urn-nbn
Total: 142 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf