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Is acetylcholine a signaling molecule for human colon cancer progression?
Univ Gothenburg, Sahlgrenska Acad, Dept Surg, Gothenburg, Sweden..
Karlstad University, Faculty of Technology and Science, Department of Chemistry and Biomedical Sciences.
Kungalv Dist Hosp, Dept Surg, Kungalv, Sweden..
Vaxjo Cent Hosp, Dept Surg, Vaxjo, Sweden..
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2011 (English)In: Scandinavian Journal of Gastroenterology, ISSN 0036-5521, E-ISSN 1502-7708, Vol. 46, no 4, 446-455 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
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Abstract [en]

Objective. Non-neuronal acetylcholine (ACh) has been suggested to be a mediator for the development of various types of cancer. We analyzed a possible role for this molecule in carcinogenesis and/or progression of human colon cancer, in patient biopsies harvested from the colon during surgery. We addressed whether ACh synthesis (by choline acetyltransferase) and/or degradation (by ACh esterase), as well as the expression of the alpha alpha 7-subtype of the nicotinic ACh receptors, and the peptide ligand at the alpha alpha 7 receptors, secreted mammalian Ly6/urokinase-type plasminogen activator receptor-related protein-1, respectively, are deranged in tumor tissue as compared with macroscopically tumor-free colon tissue. Methods. A total of 38 patients were grouped for analysis based on their respective Dukes stage (either Dukes A ++ B or C ++ D). A mucosal tissue sample was harvested from macroscopically tumor-free colon tissue (i.e. control tissue), as well as from the tumor, and protein lysates were prepared for quantitative Western blotting. Full-thickness specimens were taken for immunohistochemistry. Results. For all the above named markers, there was a significant difference between control and tumor tissue with regard to protein levels, and there was, in addition, a significant difference in protein levels between the Dukes A ++ B and C ++ D groups. Conclusion. The current findings may suggest a role for ACh in colon carcinogenesis/cancer progression; the data obtained could have prognostic and/or therapeutic significance for this disease.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2011. Vol. 46, no 4, 446-455 p.
Keyword [en]
Acetylcholine, choline acetyltransferase, colon cancer, nicotinic acetylcholine receptor, SLURP-1
National Category
Medical Biotechnology Cancer and Oncology
Research subject
Biomedical Sciences
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:kau:diva-40631DOI: 10.3109/00365521.2010.539252ISI: 000288170600009PubMedID: 21265716OAI: oai:DiVA.org:kau-40631DiVA: diva2:905463
Available from: 2016-02-22 Created: 2016-02-22 Last updated: 2017-10-31Bibliographically approved

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