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Can financial insecurity and condescending treatment explain the higher prevalence of poor self-rated health in women than in men?: A population-based cross-sectional study in Sweden
Vasteras & Karlstad Univ, Vastmanland Cty Council, Competence Ctr Hlth, S-72189 Karlstad, Sweden..
Sormland Cty Council, Res & Dev Ctr, Eskilstuna, Sweden..ORCID iD: 0000-0002-6174-3874
Uppsala Cty Council, Dept Community Med, Uppsala, Sweden..
Varmland Cty Council, Dept Community Med, Karlstad, Sweden..
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2012 (English)In: International Journal for Equity in Health, ISSN 1475-9276, E-ISSN 1475-9276, Vol. 11, 50Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Introduction: Women have in general poorer self-rated health than men. Both material and psychosocial conditions have been found to be associated with self-rated health. We investigated whether two such factors, financial insecurity and condescending treatment, could explain the difference in self-rated health between women and men. Methods: The association between the two factors and self-rated health was investigated in a population-based sample of 35,018 respondents. The data were obtained using a postal survey questionnaire sent to a random sample of men and women aged 18-75 years in 2008. The area covers 55 municipalities in central Sweden and the overall response rate was 59%. Multinomial odds ratios for poor self-rated health were calculated adjusting for age, educational level and longstanding illness and in the final model also for financial insecurity and condescending treatment. Results: The prevalence of poor self-rated health was 7.4% among women and 6.0% among men. Women reported more often financial insecurity and condescending treatment than men did. The odds ratio for poor self-rated health in relation to good self-rated health was 1.29 (95% CI: 1.17-1.42) for women compared to men when adjusted for age, educational level and longstanding illness. The association became, however, statistically non-significant when adjusted for financial insecurity and condescending treatment. Conclusion: The present findings suggest that women would have as good self-rated health as men if they had similar financial security as men and were not treated in a condescending manner to a larger extent than men. Longitudinal studies are, however, required to confirm this conclusion.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
London: BioMed Central, 2012. Vol. 11, 50
Keyword [en]
Gender, Health inequalities, Self-rated health, Population surveys, Sweden
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Research subject
Public Health Science
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:kau:diva-38487DOI: 10.1186/1475-9276-11-50ISI: 000309216800001PubMedID: 22937777OAI: oai:DiVA.org:kau-38487DiVA: diva2:896840
Available from: 2016-01-22 Created: 2015-11-23 Last updated: 2016-10-04Bibliographically approved

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Granstrom, Fredrik
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