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Cognitive-behavioral therapy for insomnia co-morbid with hearing impairment: a randomized controlled trial
Örebro universitet, Institutionen för juridik, psykologi och socialt arbete.
Örebro universitet, Institutionen för juridik, psykologi och socialt arbete.ORCID iD: 0000-0001-5359-0452
Örebro universitet, Institutionen för juridik, psykologi och socialt arbete.
Örebro universitet, Institutionen för hälsovetenskap och medicin.
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2012 (English)In: Journal of clinical psychology in medical settings, ISSN 1068-9583, E-ISSN 1573-3572, Vol. 19, no 2, 224-234 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The purpose of the current study was to examine the effects of cognitive behavior therapy (CBT-I) for insomnia on patients with insomnia co-morbid with hearing impairment. A randomized controlled design was used with a 3-month follow-up. Thirty-two patients with insomnia co-morbid with hearing impairment were randomized to either CBT-I or a waitlist condition (WLC). The primary outcome was insomnia severity. Secondary outcomes were sleep diary parameters, dysfunction, anxiety, and depression. Compared to WLC, CBT-I resulted in lower insomnia severity at post-treatment and at follow-up (d = 1.18–1.56). Relative to WLC, CBT-I also led, at both assessment points, to reduced total wake time (d = 1.39) and increased sleep restoration (d = 1.03–1.07) and sleep quality (d = 0.91–1.16). Both groups increased their total sleep time, but no significant group difference emerged. Compared to WLC, CBT-I resulted in higher function (d = 0.81–0.96) and lower anxiety (d = 1.29–1.30) at both assessment points. Neither CBT-I nor WLC led to improvement on depression. Based on the Insomnia Severity Index, more CBT-I (53–77%) than WLC participants (0–7%) were treatment responders. Also, more CBT-I (24%) than WLC participants (0%) remitted. In patients with insomnia co-morbid with hearing impairment, CBT-I was effective in decreasing insomnia severity, subjective sleep parameters, dysfunction, and anxiety. These findings are in line with previous results on the effects of CBT-I in other medical conditions.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2012. Vol. 19, no 2, 224-234 p.
Keyword [en]
insomnia, hearing impairment, tinnitus, cognitive behavior therapy, co-morbidity
National Category
Applied Psychology Medical and Health Sciences
Research subject
Psychology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:kau:diva-38373DOI: 10.1007/s10880-011-9275-yISI: 000303866900009PubMedID: 22323041OAI: oai:DiVA.org:kau-38373DiVA: diva2:868867
Available from: 2012-02-15 Created: 2015-11-12 Last updated: 2016-02-12Bibliographically approved

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Jansson-Fröjmark, MarkusLinton, Steven J.Flink, Ida K.Granberg, SarahDanermark, BerthNorell-Clarke, Annika
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