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Psychometric testing of the Norwegian version of the questionnaire, Student Satisfaction and Self-Confidence in Learning, used in simulation
Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Health Sciences. Faculty of Health, Care and Nursing, Department of Nursing, Gjøvik University College, Norway. (randi.tosterud@hig.no)
Faculty of Health, Care and Nursing, Department of Nursing, Gjøvik University College, Norway.
Faculty of Health, Care and Nursing, Department of Nursing, Gjøvik University College, Norway.
Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Health Sciences.ORCID iD: 0000-0003-3385-3731
2014 (English)In: Nurse Education in Practice, ISSN 1471-5953, E-ISSN 1873-5223Article in journal (Refereed) In press
Abstract [en]

Simulation is increasingly being used as an approach to learning in nurse education. There is a need for frameworks and valid evaluation tools to help guide educators in implementing the method. The questionnaire, Student Satisfaction and Self-Confidence in Learning, which consists of two subscales, has been developed by the National League for Nursing in the US for evaluating simulation used in nurse education.

The aim of the present study was to test the questionnaire, Student Satisfaction and Self-Confidence in Learning, for psychometric properties in a Norwegian nurse education context.

A sample consisting of 130 nursing students participated in a simulation situation, and 123 responded. When the questionnaire was tested in its entirety, psychometric testing conducted with a principal component analysis did not reveal a stable factor solution. The two subscales were then tested separately. The analysis for Satisfaction with Current Learning suggested a one-component solution, thereby explaining 62.8% of the variance, and the internal reliability was 0.84. With regard to Self-Confidence in Learning, no stable solution was achieved, and an alpha value of 0.64 was shown.

To further validate the questionnaire, Student Satisfaction and Self-Confidence in Learning, more studies by various nursing programmes in different cultural contexts are recommended.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2014.
Keyword [en]
Exploratory factor analysis, Human patient simulation, Nursing students, Student satisfaction
National Category
Nursing
Research subject
Nursing Science
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:kau:diva-34601DOI: 10.1016/j.nepr.2014.10.004ISI: 000349568300020PubMedID: 25458231OAI: oai:DiVA.org:kau-34601DiVA: diva2:763435
Available from: 2014-11-14 Created: 2014-11-14 Last updated: 2016-04-13Bibliographically approved
In thesis
1. Simulation used as a learning approach in nursing education: Students’ experiences and validation of evaluation questionnaires
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Simulation used as a learning approach in nursing education: Students’ experiences and validation of evaluation questionnaires
2015 (English)Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

The overall aim was to investigate bachelor nursing students’ experiences with simulation as a learning approach conducted under various conditions. Additionally, the aim was to translate and validate questionnaires for the evaluation of simulation in a Norwegian context.

Methods: Quantitative and qualitative methods were used. Nursing students responded to three questionnaires after attending either low- or high-fidelity simulation. Data were analyzed with statistics (I). Two evaluation questionnaires were subjected to a principal components analysis (II, III). Data were obtained from nursing students through focus group interviews, and analyzed with a qualitative content analysis (IV).

Main findings: Independent of the fidelity level in the simulation and educational level, the students reported satisfaction and that the emphasized features in learning were present. Those who had used a paper/pencil case study were the most satisfied (I). Debriefing was reported to be crucial for learning, but in particular by attending the large groups, also as a stressful and intrusive situation (IV).The Norwegian version of the questionnaire, the Student Satisfaction and Self-Confidence Scale, revealed no stable factor solution (II). The translated version of the Debriefing Experience Scale was shown to hold a good potential for evaluating debriefing, but benefited from reducing the subscales (III). To ensure safety and security were reported to be a prerequisite for learning, with the students requesting a more frequent use of simulation and a higher degree of familiarity with active learning in their program in general (IV).

Conclusions: Simulation at all fidelity levels should be used in nursing education. To exploit the potential, the learning approaches should be integrated into the program in general through a systematic and structured building of a learning community. A further validation and testing of the questionnaires in different programs and contexts is needed.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Karlstad: Karlstads universitet, 2015. 87 p.
Series
Karlstad University Studies, ISSN 1403-8099 ; 2015:1
Keyword
debriefing, evaluation questionnaires, fidelity, nursing students, experiences, psychometric testing, simulation
National Category
Nursing
Research subject
Nursing Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kau:diva-34549 (URN)978-91-7063-608-0 (ISBN)
Public defence
2015-01-23, 1 A 305, Lagerlöfsalen, Karlstads universitet, Karlstad, 11:00 (Norwegian)
Opponent
Supervisors
Available from: 2014-12-05 Created: 2014-11-05 Last updated: 2016-04-13Bibliographically approved

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Tosterud, RandiPetzäll, KerstinHall-Lord, Marie-Louise
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