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Winter temperature and food quality affect age and size at maturity in ectotherms: an experimentaltest with Atlantic salmon.
(Naturresurs Rinnande Vatten)
2012 (English)In: Canadian Journal of Fisheries and Aquatic Sciences, ISSN 0706-652X, E-ISSN 1205-7533, Vol. 69, no 11, 1817-1826 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Field studies have revealed that many ectotherms mature younger and smaller in warmer environments although they grow faster. This has puzzled ecologists because the direct effect of factors that accelerate growth is expected to be larger, not smaller size. We tested this experimentally for Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar) at two winter temperatures and diets. Logistic regression revealed that the probability of maturation during the second year in sea water, relative to the probability of older maturation, increased with temperature and growth rate during the first winter. Also, large size and high condition factor 1 year prior to maturation stimulated maturation. In females, a high lipid diet increased the probability of maturation as one-sea-winter fish, and there were significant interactions between winter temperature and food quality and between body size and condition factor the first autumn in sea water. Thus, if the direct effect of temperature on growth rate is the main effect of warming, salmon are likely to attain maturity younger and smaller. Also, richer food decreased age at maturation in females. This finding has consequences for interpretations of climate change impacts on age at maturity in Atlantic salmon and may also hold for many other ectotherm species.

Salmo salar) at two winter temperatures and

diets. Logistic regression revealed that the probability of maturation during the second year in sea water, relative to the

probability of older maturation, increased with temperature and growth rate during the first winter. Also, large size and

high condition factor 1 year prior to maturation stimulated maturation. In females, a high lipid diet increased the probability of

maturation as one-sea-winter fish, and there were significant interactions between winter temperature and food quality and

between body size and condition factor the first autumn in sea water. Thus, if the direct effect of temperature on growth rate is

the main effect of warming, salmon are likely to attain maturity younger and smaller. Also, richer food decreased age at

maturation in females. This finding has consequences for interpretations of climate change impacts on age at maturity in Atlantic salmon and may also hold for many other ectotherm species.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Canada. Dept. of Fisheries and Oceans; National Research Council Canada, National Research Council Canada , 2012. Vol. 69, no 11, 1817-1826 p.
National Category
Natural Sciences
Research subject
Biology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:kau:diva-34186DOI: 10.1139/f2012-108ISI: 000311209800010OAI: oai:DiVA.org:kau-34186DiVA: diva2:753913
Available from: 2014-10-09 Created: 2014-10-09 Last updated: 2015-12-30Bibliographically approved

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Jonsson, Bror
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