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Let there be light!: An initial exploratory study of whether lightning influences consumer evaluations of packaged food products.
Karlstad University, Faculty of Economic Sciences, Communication and IT, Department of Psychology. Karlstad University, Faculty of Economic Sciences, Communication and IT, Service Research Center.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-0283-8777
Karlstad University, Faculty of Economic Sciences, Communication and IT, Department of Business Administration. Karlstad University, Faculty of Economic Sciences, Communication and IT, Service Research Center.
Karlstad University, Faculty of Technology and Science, Department of Chemical Engineering.
2014 (English)In: Journal of sensory studies, ISSN 0887-8250, E-ISSN 1745-459X, Vol. 29, no 4, p. 294-300Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This study investigates how lighting influences consumer evaluations of packaged food products. Fifty-eight participants evaluated two identical packaged meals (alternated between subjects) in a laboratory setting. The products were stored in a freezer with cold light (blue light-emitting diode [LED]) on one side and warm light (yellow LED) on the other side. A three-way mixed multivariate analysis of variance (MANOVA) revealed that, independent of package color and gender, food products were evaluated more negatively in the cold light than in the warm light in terms of quality, attractiveness and inferred taste. Therefore, lighting may influence consumers' overall evaluations of packaged meals. This finding also highlights the managerial problem whereby the lighting standards that exist at print agencies in order to eliminate ambiguities when making decisions about package design are rare for in-store lighting. Consequently, products that look attractive at the print agency may look unappealing in a store. The results are discussed in terms of processing fluency and cross-modal correspondences.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2014. Vol. 29, no 4, p. 294-300
National Category
Business Administration
Research subject
Business Administration
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:kau:diva-33701DOI: 10.1111/joss.12103ISI: 000340685000007OAI: oai:DiVA.org:kau-33701DiVA, id: diva2:747197
Available from: 2014-09-16 Created: 2014-09-16 Last updated: 2018-05-25Bibliographically approved

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Otterbring, TobiasLöfgren, MartinLestelius, Magnus

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  • apa
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