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Determinants of tooth loss and chewing ability in mid- and late life in three Swedish birth cohorts
Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Health Sciences. Aging Research Center, Karolinska Institute and Stockholm University and Academic Centre for Gerodontics, Stockholm.
Department of Dental Medicine, Karolinska Institute and Academic Centre for Gerodontics, Stockholm.
Aging Research Center, Stockholm University/Karolinska Insititute and Academic Centre for Gerodontics, Stockholm.
Aging Research Center, Stockholm University/Karolinska Insititute.
2014 (English)In: Ageing & Society, ISSN 0144-686X, E-ISSN 1469-1779, Vol. 35, no 5, 1304-1317 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The aim of the research presented is to determine the influence of socio-economic factors in childhood and mid-life on multiple tooth loss and chewing problems in mid- and late life in three Swedish birth cohorts (1903–1910, 1911–1920 and 1921–1925). Longitudinal national Swedish surveys were used for the analysis. Participants were interviewed in mid-life in 1968 and later in life (77–99 years of age) in 2002. Childhood socio-economic positions (SEP) did not result in different odds of multiple tooth loss and chewing problems in mid- and late life, but persons with higher mid-life SEP had lower odds. Persons born into the 1921–1925 birth cohort had significantly lower odds of multiple tooth loss in late life than the 1903–1910 birth cohort. Women had higher odds of losing multiple teeth than men in late life but not mid-life. Neither gender nor childhood and mid-life SEP predicted chewing problems late in life, but older people with multiple tooth loss had higher odds of chewing difficulty than those with mainly natural teeth. Childhood conditions may contribute to multiple tooth loss in mid-life, which subsequently contributes to multiple tooth loss in late life. Tooth loss in late life is strongly associated with difficulty chewing hard food. Prevalence of multiple tooth loss is higher in women than in men in late life but not in mid-life.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2014. Vol. 35, no 5, 1304-1317 p.
Keyword [en]
Tooth loss, chewing difficulty, tooth loss, birth cohorts, socio-economic position
National Category
Health Sciences
Research subject
Dental Hygiene
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:kau:diva-33490DOI: 10.1017/S0144686X14000282ISI: 000357882700008OAI: oai:DiVA.org:kau-33490DiVA: diva2:741887
Available from: 2014-08-29 Created: 2014-08-29 Last updated: 2016-04-13Bibliographically approved

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