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Juvenile brown trout response to fine woody debris in experimental stream channels
Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Environmental and Life Sciences. (Naturresurs Rinnande Vatten)
Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Biology.ORCID iD: 0000-0003-2220-1615
(English)Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Changes in riparian vegetation due to forest harvesting may affect the input of fine woody debris, an important structural element, to streams. Woody debris has been shown to benefit trout populations. In-stream fine woody debris (FWD) has not been studied as extensively as large woody debris, but is probably important to smaller-sized trout. In a laboratory stream experiment we tested young-of-the-year wild brown trout, Salmo trutta, responses to three densities of fine woody debris (FWD). The trout were tested as singletons and four together. Swimming activity increased with increasing fish density and decreasing FWD density. Foraging decreased and time spent in FWD increased with increasing FWD density. Aggressiveness was lowest in intermediate FWD density. Our study shows that FWD impact on trout is related to fish rank, fish density and FWD density, and that juvenile trout response to fine WD is different from the response to large WD reported by others.

Keyword [en]
fine woody debris, brown trout, juvenile, streams
National Category
Natural Sciences
Research subject
Biology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:kau:diva-31671OAI: oai:DiVA.org:kau-31671DiVA: diva2:703935
Available from: 2014-03-10 Created: 2014-03-10 Last updated: 2015-11-12Bibliographically approved
In thesis
1. Effects of fine woody debris on juvenile brown trout (Salmo trutta) and drifting invertebrates
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Effects of fine woody debris on juvenile brown trout (Salmo trutta) and drifting invertebrates
2014 (English)Licentiate thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

In boreal forest streams, woody debris is an important habitat component. Stream invertebrates and salmonids such as brown trout benefit from in-stream wood. The studies presented in this thesis explore how drifting stream invertebrates respond to addition of fine woody debris, and how young-of-the-year (0+) brown trout behave in habitats with and without fine woody debris. The first paper reports results from a field experiment where fine woody debris was added to streams, and invertebrate drift was measured in order to detect impacts of the fine woody debris on drift density, biomass and taxon diversity. In the end of the season, the fine woody debris-affected drift samples showed higher density, biomass and taxon diversity than the control samples. In the second paper, I describe effects of fine woody debris on 0+ brown trout, studied in laboratory stream channels. Trout were tested in habitats without fine woody debris, with an intermediate fine woody debris density, and with a high fine woody debris density. Swimming activity and foraging time were significantly lower when fine woody debris was present than when it was absent. More time was spent sheltering at the high fine woody debris density than at the intermediate one. The increasing exploitation of fine woody debris for biofuel purposes should be considered in relation to the effects on brown trout and stream invertebrate habitat.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Karlstad: Karlstads universitet, 2014. 22 p.
Series
Karlstad University Studies, ISSN 1403-8099 ; 2014:15
Keyword
brown trout, juvenile, stream, woody debris, invertebrates, fine woody debris
National Category
Natural Sciences
Research subject
Biology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kau:diva-31672 (URN)978-91-7063-545-8 (ISBN)
Presentation
2014-04-29, 11D227, Universitetsg 2, Karlstad, 10:00 (English)
Opponent
Supervisors
Note

Artikel 1 ingick i avhandlingen som manuskript med titeln "Effects of fine wood addition on invertebrate drift in boreal forest streams". Nu publicerad.

Available from: 2014-04-07 Created: 2014-03-10 Last updated: 2016-03-03Bibliographically approved

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