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Primary Process in Competitive Archery Performance: Effects of Flotation REST
Karlstad University, Faculty of Economic Sciences, Communication and IT, Department of Psychology.
Karlstad University, Faculty of Economic Sciences, Communication and IT, Department of Psychology.
1999 (English)In: Journal of Applied Sport Psychology, 11, 194-209Article in journal (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

The purpose of the present study was to investigate whether or nor the floating form of Restricted Environmental Stimulation Technique (REST) may be exploited within the field of competitive archery to reinforce primary process (inner-directed) orientation and thereby enhance the quality of coaching and training. Floatation REST consists of a procedure whereby an individual is immersed in a water-tank filled with saltwater of an extremely high salt concentration. The experiment was performed over the course of two weekends with a six-week interval in-between. Twenty participating archers, thirteen male and seven female, were recruited. The between-group factor was "adjudged skill". The within-group factor was provided by an Armchair condition in which the participants sat in an armchair for 45 min after which they were required to shoot four salvo series of three shots each, as a comparison to the Flotation-Rest condition whereby the participants were required to lie in a floating-tank for 45 min just prior to shooting. Results indicated that: (a) the participants experienced less perceived exertion during marksmanship in the floating condition, (b) the elite archers performed more consistently in the Flotation-REST condition, (c) the least and most proficient archers had lower muscle tension in the Extensor Digitorum in the Flotation REST condition

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
1999.
National Category
Psychology
Research subject
Psychology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:kau:diva-22559OAI: oai:DiVA.org:kau-22559DiVA: diva2:596311
Available from: 2013-01-22 Created: 2013-01-22 Last updated: 2013-01-22

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