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Can the net energy intake hypothesis be used to explain microhabitat segregation by sympatric juvenile coho salmon and steelhead trout?
Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Biology.
2003 (English)Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Juvenile coho and steelhead are found sympatrically in steams thoughout the Pacific Northwest and Alaska. Empirical evidence shows that the species segregate microhabitat, with coho typically occupying pools and steelhead occupying riffles or runs. Although most biologists could probably accurately predict what section of stream might be considered coho or steelhead habitat, most would be at a loss to explain why. In an attempt to test one possible explanation, i.e., that each species maximizes its net energy intake at its respective preferred water velocity, I conducted stream tank experiments to assess the influence of water velocity on prey capture probability and net energy intake. Because steelhead are typically found in faster water velocities than are coho, I hypothesized that steelhead would maximize their net energy intake at a faster velocity. Five fish of each species were tested individually at each of six water velocities spanning the observed velocity range for both species. Feeding trials were videotaped with two cameras to facilitate 3-D analyses of the fishs prey capture area. These analyses provide an accurate measure of the temporal and spatial dynamics of prey capture maneuvers, and allow me to develop prey capture probability- and net energy intake-contours for each species at the different water velocities. The results of these and similar experiments on the effects of water depth will be used to develop and field-test habitat selection models for coho and steelhead that integrate physical habitat features with the bioenergetic costs and benefits for each species

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2003.
National Category
Biological Sciences
Research subject
Biology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:kau:diva-17558OAI: oai:DiVA.org:kau-17558DiVA: diva2:591166
Conference
International IFIM Users' Workshop, June 1-5, 2003, Fort Collins, CO
Available from: 2013-01-21 Created: 2013-01-21 Last updated: 2013-01-21

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