Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
The Geo-Social Structuration of Mediatized Lifeworlds: An Empirical Re-Assessment of "Local" and "Cosmopolitan" Modes of News Consumption
Karlstad University, Faculty of Economic Sciences, Communication and IT, Department of Media and Communication Studies. (Medie- och kommunikationsvetenskap)ORCID iD: 0000-0001-6689-0710
Karlstad University, Faculty of Economic Sciences, Communication and IT, Department of Media and Communication Studies. (Medie- och kommunikationsvetenskap)
2012 (English)Conference paper, (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
Abstract [en]

The concept of “cosmopolitanization” (Beck) holds a complex, even contradictory, meaning. On the one hand, globalization has created growing opportunities for geo-socially expanding the lifeworld beyond local and regional boundaries, as well as for exploring different parts of the world in a cosmopolitan way. On the other hand, new global connectivities and cultural flows are in certain social contexts seen as a threat to local communities and the existing social order. Thus, also in a cosmopolitanized society, where fewer boundaries can be taken for granted, there exist tensions between “cosmopolitans” and more protectionist groupings. In a certain sense, this tension (which is of course much more complex than a one-dimensional continuum) corresponds to Merton’s classical distinction between “locals” and “cosmopolitans” – a distinction that refers to whether people are oriented towards issues and events related to their local environment or to the world at large, for example in their media use and political engagement. In this paper we provide an empirical illumination of how the expansion of the lifeworld, via news media consumption, is related to various structural and positional factors. Analyzing the results from a statistically representative survey, conducted in the region of Värmland, Sweden, in 2010, we show how different groups of media users value news content pertaining to different regional and extra-regional levels. In particular, we explicate how these preferences are distributed in social space (Bourdieu), and in relation to cultural value structures (notably in terms of “cosmopolitanism”). Firstly, the statistical pattern actualizes the relevance of Merton’s distinction between “locals” and “cosmopolitans” (given its original, very confined understanding of “cosmopolitan”); there is indeed a socio-cultural polarization related to whether people think news from extra-regional centres are important or not. These findings confirm that there are significant social tensions integral to the cosmopolitanization process. Secondly, our results show that the regional centre, the city of Karlstad, is generally understood as the most important “news-space”, across social space. Accordingly, one must conclude that the mediatization process also today is perhaps more significant in terms of reproducing regional identity and a local lifeworld, than in fostering cosmopolitan outlooks

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Istanbul, 2012.
National Category
Media and Communications
Research subject
Media and Communication Studies
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:kau:diva-15351OAI: oai:DiVA.org:kau-15351DiVA: diva2:563076
Conference
The 4th European Conference on Communication "Social Media And Global Voices" 24-27 October 2012, Istanbul, Turkey
Available from: 2012-10-28 Created: 2012-10-28 Last updated: 2015-12-02Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

No full text

Other links

http://www.ecrea.eu/events/about/id/53

Search in DiVA

By author/editor
Lindell, JohanJansson, André
By organisation
Department of Media and Communication Studies
Media and Communications

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar

Total: 426 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf