Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Hope and athlete burnout: Stress and affect as mediators
Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Environmental Sciences. (Idrottsvetenskap)
Örebro universitet.
University of Utah.
The Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, Sweden.
Show others and affiliations
2013 (English)In: Psychology of Sport And Exercise, ISSN 1469-0292, E-ISSN 1878-5476, Vol. 14, no 5, 640-649 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Objective

In this study we examined the relationship between trait hope and burnout in elite junior soccer players and whether stress and positive and negative affect mediated this relationship.

Methods

Participants were 238 Swedish soccer players (166 males, 71 females; one did not indicate gender) aged 15–19 years who completed questionnaires measuring trait hope, perceived stress, positive and negative affect, and athlete burnout (i.e., emotional/physical exhaustion, a reduced sense of accomplishment, and sport devaluation).

Results

Bivariate correlations were consistent with hope theory contentions indicating significant negative relationships between hope and all three burnout dimensions. The relationship between hope and emotional/physical exhaustion was fully mediated by stress and positive affect. For sport devaluation and reduced sense of accomplishment, stress and positive affect partially mediated the relationship with hope. In contrast, negative affect did not mediate the relationship between hope and any of the burnout dimensions.

Conclusion

The results support earlier findings that hope is negatively related to athlete burnout. Support was also found for the hypothesis that high hope individuals would experience less stress and therefore less burnout. Promoting hope may be relevant in reducing the likelihood of this detrimental syndrome.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2013. Vol. 14, no 5, 640-649 p.
Keyword [en]
Coaching, Elite athletes, Emotions, Overtraining, Stress management, Positive
National Category
Social Sciences Interdisciplinary
Research subject
Sports Science
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:kau:diva-13204DOI: 10.1016/j.psychsport.2013.03.008ISI: 000324454500006OAI: oai:DiVA.org:kau-13204DiVA: diva2:524989
Available from: 2012-05-04 Created: 2012-05-04 Last updated: 2015-01-29Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

No full text

Other links

Publisher's full text

Search in DiVA

By author/editor
Gustafsson, HenrikWagnsson, Stefan
By organisation
Department of Health and Environmental Sciences
In the same journal
Psychology of Sport And Exercise
Social Sciences Interdisciplinary

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar

Altmetric score

Total: 85 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf