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The role of the environment in partial migration: food availability affects the adoption of a migratory tactic in brown trout Salmo trutta
Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Biology.
Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Biology.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-3191-7140
Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Biology.ORCID iD: 0000-0003-2220-1615
Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Biology.
2009 (English)In: Ecology of Freshwater Fish, ISSN 0906-6691, E-ISSN 1600-0633, Vol. 18, no 1, 52-59 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Alternative reproductive tactics are commonly reported for salmonids (Pisces) and typically involve large migratory and small resident individuals. Variation in migratory tendency should reflect the different benefits and costs that the two different phenotypes face with regard to fitness. Therefore, the effect of food availability on the adoption of a migratory tactic in brown trout was investigated. Fifty trout were placed in each of 12 tanks and fed at three different levels. Growth-related variables were measured regularly, and at the end of the experiment, the proportion of migrants and residents was recorded. Low food availability led to increased numbers of migratory fish. The expected sex-bias was also present, with a lower percentage of resident females than resident males. As all fish originated from the same gene pool, the changing proportions of the migratory tactics can be classified as phenotypic plasticity. The study provides evidence that the different phenotypes reflect alternative tactics within a conditional strategy. Some differences in growth-related variables were present between the sexes, and a very pronounced difference in condition factor was found between resident and migratory males, but not in females. Thus, the results provide evidence that different selective forces may be acting on the sexes.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Wiley-Blackwell, 2009. Vol. 18, no 1, 52-59 p.
Keyword [en]
Salmo trutta salmonids partial migration phenotypic plasticity
National Category
Biological Sciences
Research subject
Biology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:kau:diva-10969DOI: 10.1111/j.1600-0633.2008.00322.xOAI: oai:DiVA.org:kau-10969DiVA: diva2:494532
Available from: 2012-02-08 Created: 2012-02-08 Last updated: 2015-11-12Bibliographically approved

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Publisher's full texthttp://www3.interscience.wiley.com/journal/120779795/abstract

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CiteExportLink to record
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