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Why is research on management accounting change not explicitly evolutionary? Taking the next step in the conceptualisation of management accounting change
Swedish Business School, Örebro University, Sweden.
Karlstad University, Faculty of Economic Sciences, Communication and IT, Department of Business Administration. School of Business, Economics and Law, University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
2009 (English)In: Management Accounting Research, ISSN 1044-5005, E-ISSN 1096-1224, Vol. 20, no 2, 146-162 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

In this article we discuss the evolutionary foundation of the OIE-guided management accounting change research building on the framework of [Scapens R.W. 1994. Never mind the gap: towards an institutional perspective on management accounting practice. Management Accounting Research, 5, 301321.] and [Burns, J. and Scapens, R.W., 2000. Conceptualizing management accounting change: an institutional framework. Management Accounting Research, 11, 325.].We argue that research on management accounting change should be based on evolutionary theory, but that the full potential of evolutionary theory has not yet been described or used in management accounting research. The conceptualisation and understanding of management accounting change can be improved and expanded if the evolutionary approach is developed beyond the general belief that it describes only small and gradual, often slow, changes. In this article we show that an evolutionary perspective on management accounting change implies that management accountings development is explained as the interaction between the evolutionary sub processes of retention (inheritance), variation and selection. Thus, both continuity and change are seen as evolutionary outcomes. These processes follow the cumulative causality that Charles Darwin proposed and Thorstein Veblen applied to the social sciences. Such a comprehensive theory, here labelled Universal Darwinism, must, however, be given substance with supporting details

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier , 2009. Vol. 20, no 2, 146-162 p.
Keyword [en]
Management accounting change, Rules, Routines, Institutions, Selection, Variation Retention
National Category
Business Administration
Research subject
Business Administration
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:kau:diva-10118DOI: 10.1016/j.mar.2008.12.001OAI: oai:DiVA.org:kau-10118DiVA: diva2:493638
Available from: 2012-02-08 Created: 2012-02-08 Last updated: 2015-05-27Bibliographically approved

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CiteExportLink to record
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Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
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  • de-DE
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  • nn-NB
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  • Other locale
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