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Burnout in health-care professionals during reorganizations and downsizing. A cohort study in nurses
Faculty of Health, Care and Nursing, Gjøvik University College, Gjøvik, Norway.
Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Nursing.ORCID iD: 0000-0003-3385-3731
Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim, Norway.
2010 (English)In: BMC Nursing, ISSN 1472-6955, Vol. 9, no 8, 1-7 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background

Burnout is a psychological reaction triggered by interaction between personal characteristics and stress factors. Reorganizations and downsizing with increased workload imply stress for health-care professionals. This is a study of burnout in nurses during a period with two comprehensive reorganizations.     

Methods

In this quasi-experimental retrospective cohort study, burnout was assessed in nurses         with long work experience in three surveys during a 30 months' period with two comprehensive reorganizations and downsizing of a hospital unit with mostly seriously ill patients with cancer. Burnout was measured with Bergen Burnout Indicator (BBI) at each survey, and "Sense of Coherence" (SOC) with Antonovsky's questionnaire at the last survey.     

Results

One man and 45 women aged 30 to 65 years were invited to the surveys. There was a         significant increase in burnout during the study period, the mean increase in BBI-score         was 12.5 pr year (p < 0.001). The proportion of satisfied nurses at the first and last survey were 84% and 35% respectively, and the proportions with burnout were 0% and 29% respectively (p < 0.001). Except for auxiliary nurses with experience from  the medical department, all subgroups experienced a significant increase in BBI. Burnout was associated with low SOC (p < 0.001, r square 0.33).     

Conclusions

There was a significant development of burnout in a group of nurses during a period         with two reorganizations and downsizing. Burnout was associated with low SOC. Working  with seriously ill patients with cancer has probably made the nurses exceptionally  vulnerable to the stress and workload related to the reorganizations

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
London: BioMed Central, 2010. Vol. 9, no 8, 1-7 p.
National Category
Nursing
Research subject
Nursing Science
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:kau:diva-9998OAI: oai:DiVA.org:kau-9998DiVA: diva2:493514
Available from: 2012-02-08 Created: 2012-02-08 Last updated: 2016-04-13Bibliographically approved

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http://htpp://biomedcentral.comhttp://biomedcentral.com/1472-6955/9/8

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CiteExportLink to record
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Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
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