Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Parental monitoring, peer activities and alcohol use: A study based on data on Swedish adolescents
Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Centre for Research on Child and Adolescent Mental Health.
Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Centre for Research on Child and Adolescent Mental Health.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-2986-2128
Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Social Studies.
2011 (English)In: Drugs: education prevention and policy, ISSN 0968-7637, E-ISSN 1465-3370, ISSN 0968-7637 (print), 1465-3370 (electronic), Vol. 18, no 2, 100-107 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Aim: This study investigates the association between two types of social relations during leisure time (to parents and peers) and the frequency of alcohol use among Swedish adolescents, taking possible interaction effects into account.

Methods: The data were collected during the 1995–2005 time period by using a questionnaire handed out in the class room. The study includes about 10,000 Swedish adolescents aged 15–16 years.

Results: The results show that there are strong associations between the social relations adolescents have during leisure time (both to parents and peers) and the frequency of alcohol use. High levels of peer activity were associated with higher frequencies of alcohol use. Although the effects of relations with parents were modified by peer activity frequencies, high levels of parental monitoring were significantly associated with lower frequencies of alcohol use, regardless of the peer activity frequencies.

Conclusions: Parental monitoring is an efficient way to prevent or reduce adolescents’ alcohol use, although its importance may vary due to peer activity frequency.

 

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
London: Informa Healthcare, 2011. Vol. 18, no 2, 100-107 p.
National Category
Sociology
Research subject
Sociology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:kau:diva-7415DOI: 10.3109/09687631003649363ISI: 000287860800003OAI: oai:DiVA.org:kau-7415DiVA: diva2:417885
Available from: 2011-05-18 Created: 2011-05-18 Last updated: 2015-06-18Bibliographically approved
In thesis
1. Social Relations and Health: How do the associations vary across contexts and subgroups of individuals?
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Social Relations and Health: How do the associations vary across contexts and subgroups of individuals?
2011 (English)Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Objectives: The aim of this thesis is to study the association between social relations and health in different social spheres, and to examine possible interaction effects.

Material and Methods: In Paper I, the link between measures of the psychosocial neighbourhood environment, the psychosocial working environment, and psychosomatic health is analyzed by using a subset of data from the survey Life and Health 2000.

In Paper II, the association between adolescent social relationships in school and psychosomatic health was analyzed by using the survey Young in Värmland.

In Paper III, the association between parental monitoring, peer activity frequency, and adolescent alcohol use was studied by using Young in Värmland as the data source.

In Paper IV, the links between adolescent perceptions of the psychosocial school climate, activities with parents, and psychosomatic health, were analysed by using Young in Värmland as the data source.

Results: The results from Paper I indicate that social relations in the neighbourhood environment, as well as the working environment, are independently related to psychosomatic health. The independent contributions imply that efforts to improve health can be successfully directed to the psychosocial neighbourhood environment, as well as to the psychosocial working environment.

The results from Paper II show that the social relations adolescents have in school may differ between subgroups of adolescents. The health effects of teacher contacts were stronger for the theoretically oriented students compared to the non-theoretically oriented students, suggesting that adolescents should be considered a heterogeneous group rather than a homogeneous one with respect to their social relations in school. Efforts to improve equity in health should consider these differences in order to be successful.

In Paper III the results imply that even though both parents and the peer group are important in order to understand the alcohol use patterns of adolescents, the importance of parents should not be underestimated. Parental monitoring had a protective effect on adolescent alcohol use, regardless of the frequency of peer activities.

In Paper IV, both the psychosocial school climate, and the frequency of activities with parents were related to psychosomatic health. The positive health effects of the psychosocial school climate were, furthermore, reinforced as a function of the frequency of activities with parents. This suggests that efforts to improve health should be directed to the school environment as well as to the family environment in order to be successful.

Conclusions: The importance and meaning of social relations differ between different social arenas as well as between sub-groups of individuals.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Karlstad: Karlstad University, 2011. 107 p.
Series
Karlstad University Studies, ISSN 1403-8099 ; 2011:30
Keyword
Social Relations, Social Capital, Health, Health Behaviours, School, Adolescents
National Category
Sociology
Research subject
Sociology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kau:diva-7364 (URN)978-91-7063-364-5 (ISBN)
Public defence
2011-06-07, Ericssonsalen, 9C 204, Karlstads universitet, Karlstad, 13:00 (Swedish)
Opponent
Supervisors
Available from: 2011-05-18 Created: 2011-05-05 Last updated: 2011-10-05Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

No full text

Other links

Publisher's full texthttp://informahealthcare.com/doi/abs/10.3109/09687631003649363

Authority records BETA

Bergh, DanielHagquist, CurtStarrin, Bengt

Search in DiVA

By author/editor
Bergh, DanielHagquist, CurtStarrin, Bengt
By organisation
Centre for Research on Child and Adolescent Mental HealthDepartment of Social Studies
In the same journal
Drugs: education prevention and policy
Sociology

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar

doi
urn-nbn

Altmetric score

doi
urn-nbn
Total: 202 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf