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Individual variation in behaviour and metabolic rates of brown trout (Salmo trutta) and Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar): evidence for coping styles?
Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Biology.
Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Biology.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-3191-7140
Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Biology.ORCID iD: 0000-0003-2220-1615
(English)Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Previous studies have suggested that there may be coping styles in salmonids, which may correspond with the decision to migrate or remain resident. Two types of coping styles have been described, a proactive one, where individuals are aggressive, bold and have a high metabolic rate and a reactive one, where individuals are less aggressive and bold, more flexible and have a lower metabolic rate. The aim of this study was to examine if coping styles could be identified in Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar), a species where nearly all individuals migrate and brown trout (Salmo trutta), a species that exhibits partial migration. No correlations between boldness, aggressiveness, standard metabolic rate (SMR) and dominance could be found in either species, which indicates that stress-related coping styles did not exist in the hatchery-reared fish used. However, dominant individuals of both species had a higher SMR than their subordinate conspecifics. Furthermore, the brown trout in this experiment were more aggressive and formed dominance relationships more rapidly than Atlantic salmon. The trout also initiated feeding faster when introduced into a new environment.

Keyword [en]
Brown trout, Atlantic salmon, coping style, behaviour, standard metabolic rate
National Category
Ecology
Research subject
Biology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:kau:diva-5592OAI: oai:DiVA.org:kau-5592DiVA: diva2:312505
Available from: 2010-04-25 Created: 2010-04-25 Last updated: 2015-11-12Bibliographically approved
In thesis
1. Relations between metabolic rate, migration and behaviour in Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar) and brown trout (Salmo trutta)
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Relations between metabolic rate, migration and behaviour in Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar) and brown trout (Salmo trutta)
2010 (English)Licentiate thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

 

ABSTRACT

 

Migration is common among populations of brown trout (Salmo trutta) and Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar). However, not all individuals in the same population migrate, a phenomenon referred to as partial migration. The aim of this thesis was to investigate if an individual’s behaviour and metabolic rate influences its decision to migrate and how such knowledge may be used when trying to produce hatchery-raised smolts with as high a proportion of migrating individuals as possible. In paper I the influence of reduced food ration on the proportion and swimming speed of migrating brown trout and Atlantic salmon smolts was investigated. Furthermore, the standard metabolic rate (SMR) of migrating and non-migrating individuals was compared. In paper II, a laboratory experiment, SMR was correlated to the behaviour of individual brown trout and Atlantic salmon. Dominant fish of both species had a higher SMR than subordinates (paper II). In addition, migrant brown trout had a higher SMR than non-migrant trout when given a normal food ration, whereas no difference in SMR between migrating and non-migrating salmon could be seen (paper I). When administered low food rations, smolts of both species migrated faster than smolts given a normal food ration, and the proportion of migrating smolts was higher for salmon given less food when the size difference for smolts from the two feeding regimes was large (paper I). Other factors that influenced migration speed were the degree of smolt development and water temperature (paper I). SMR was not correlated with aggressiveness, or with different measurements of boldness. Moreover, aggression and boldness were not correlated with each other (paper II). Trout showed a higher level of aggressiveness and acclimated more rapidly to laboratory conditions than salmon (paper II). In summary, there was no support for the existence of coping styles in migratory Atlantic salmon and brown trout. Instead, metabolic rates were related to both migratory behaviour and social status. Furthermore, an individual’s decision to migrate was influenced by ration size.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Karlstad: Karlstad University, 2010
Series
Karlstad University Studies, ISSN 1403-8099 ; 2010:14
Keyword
Atlantic salmon, brown trout, Standard metabolic rate, behaviour, migration
National Category
Ecology
Research subject
Biology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kau:diva-5593 (URN)978-91-7063-300-3  (ISBN)
Presentation
2010-06-03, 11D227, Karlstads universitet, Karlstad, 13:15 (English)
Opponent
Supervisors
Available from: 2010-05-18 Created: 2010-04-26 Last updated: 2011-10-31Bibliographically approved

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