Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Psychological risk factors for exercise dependence
Halmstad Univ, Ctr Res Welf Hlth & Sport, Halmstad, Sweden..
Halmstad Univ, Ctr Res Welf Hlth & Sport, Halmstad, Sweden..
Halmstad Univ, Ctr Res Welf Hlth & Sport, Halmstad, Sweden..
Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Health Sciences (from 2013).ORCID iD: 0000-0002-4495-6819
2019 (English)In: International Journal of Sport and Exercise Psychology, ISSN 1612-197X, E-ISSN 1557-251XArticle in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

The main aim of this study was to investigate if exercisers' personality characteristics were associated with exercise dependence. Specifically, the purpose was to examine if anxiety, obsessive passion, and physical appearance orientation were associated to an increased risk for exercise dependence. Participants were 330 exercisers from exercise groups, sport clubs and university sport science classes in the southwest of Sweden. Data were analysed using CHAID (Chi-squared Automatic Interaction Detection) analysis. The CHAID analysis indicated that anxiety was the main predictor of exercise dependence. More specifically, 12.7% more exercisers who experienced high levels of anxiety symptoms (i.e. scores above 6), were, in comparison to the exercises experiencing low levels of anxiety, classified as ?at risk for exercise dependence?. For exercisers that reported low levels of anxiety symptoms (i.e. scores below 7), obsessive passion for exercise was a positive statistically significant predictor (absolute risk difference?=?8.6%). Overall, the results highlight anxiety as a main risk factor behind exercise dependence. Also, the risk of exercise dependence may increase either from obsessive passion or as a coping strategy for anxiety. Furthermore, results may illustrate two types of exercise dependence; ?primary? exercise dependence driven mainly by an obsessive passion for exercise and ?secondary? exercise dependence where exercise function as a strategy to cope with anxiety.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
ROUTLEDGE JOURNALS, TAYLOR & FRANCIS LTD , 2019.
Keywords [en]
exercise dependence, anxiety, obsessive passion, appearance orientation
National Category
Sport and Fitness Sciences
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:kau:diva-75624DOI: 10.1080/1612197X.2019.1674902ISI: 000490899100001OAI: oai:DiVA.org:kau-75624DiVA, id: diva2:1369644
Available from: 2019-11-12 Created: 2019-11-12 Last updated: 2020-01-07Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

No full text in DiVA

Other links

Publisher's full text

Authority records BETA

Gustafsson, Henrik

Search in DiVA

By author/editor
Gustafsson, Henrik
By organisation
Department of Health Sciences (from 2013)
In the same journal
International Journal of Sport and Exercise Psychology
Sport and Fitness Sciences

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar

doi
urn-nbn

Altmetric score

doi
urn-nbn
Total: 1 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf