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Demographic factors and dental health of Swedish children and adolescents
Public Dental Service, Region Västra Götaland.
2016 (English)In: Acta Odontologica Scandinavica, ISSN 0001-6357, E-ISSN 1502-3850, Vol. 74, no 3, p. 178-85Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

OBJECTIVE: To investigate the dental health of Swedish children and adolescents with reference to age, gender and residence.

MATERIAL AND METHODS: Electronic dental records from 300,988 3-19-year-olds in one Swedish region were derived in a cross-sectional study in years 2007-2009. The DMFT system was used. Age was categorized into 3-6/7-9/10-12/13-15/16-17/18-19-year-olds and residence into 'metropolitan', 'urban' and 'rural' areas. ANOVA, generalized linear regression models and Fisher's exact test were used.

RESULTS: Among 7-9-year-old children, nine out of 10 were free from fillings and manifest caries, while for 18-19-year-olds; this proportion was one third. Girls (18-19-year-olds) had a significantly lower risk of caries compared to boys of the same age, RR for the DT index = 0.83 (95% CI = 0.81-0.85). This pattern was reversed in 7-12-year-old children. Children and adolescents in metropolitan and urban areas had significantly more caries than subjects in rural areas, for instance the RR for the DT index in metropolitan 7-9-year-olds was 2.26 (95% CI = 2.11-2.42) compared to their rural counterparts.

CONCLUSIONS: In the permanent dentition, the overall pattern revealed that girls ≤ 12 years had a higher risk of caries, while adolescent girls had a lower risk of caries, both compared with boys of corresponding ages. Living in an urban or metropolitan area entailed a higher risk of caries than living in a rural area. A greater occurrence of dental caries in adolescents than in children was confirmed. The findings should have implications for planning and evaluation of oral health promotion and disease prevention activities.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2016. Vol. 74, no 3, p. 178-85
Keywords [en]
Age distribution, dental caries, epidemiology, residence characteristics, sex
National Category
Dentistry
Research subject
Dental Hygiene
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:kau:diva-74712DOI: 10.3109/00016357.2015.1063160ISI: 000369294700003PubMedID: 26133545OAI: oai:DiVA.org:kau-74712DiVA, id: diva2:1350394
Available from: 2019-09-11 Created: 2019-09-11 Last updated: 2019-09-11Bibliographically approved

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André Kramer, Ann-Catrin André

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