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And the gifted child?: A textural analysis of Te Whariki
Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Department of Educational Studies (from 2013). Australian Catholic University, Australia. (UBB)ORCID iD: 0000-0002-7113-647x
2017 (English)In: Early Education, ISSN 1172-9112, Vol. 62, p. 19-26Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Almost all gifted children attend regular early childhood education services or schools and so meeting the needs of gifted children is part of the everyday work of all early childhood teachers (Margrain, Murphy & Dean, 2015). Early childhood education in New Zealand recognises children’s right to quality learning opportunities and has a long-standing discourse around valuing diversity. Therefore, in a situation where early childhood teachers intend to make a positive difference for all, how is it that application of quality practice for gifted children remains elusive to many teachers? Part of the answer lies in the fact that teachers say they have received little explicit pre-service or in-service education on giftedness (Margain & Farquhar, 2012). Another part of the puzzle is the continuation of common myths and misunderstandings (Margrain, et al., 2015). A third influence is the lack of explicit attention given to giftedness (or any synonyms) within Te Whāriki, the early childhood curriculum framework. This article focuses on the latter issue, but takes the stance that although there is little explicit statement about giftedness, there is a large body of implicit discourse which provides a clear mandate for gifted education. Evidencing this implicit mandate is the aim of this article. The following sections provide: a brief introduction to giftedness; the approach to textual analysis used in this study; an integrated presentation of the Te Whāriki textual analysis findings and discussion; and some practical application

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Auckland New Zealand: AUT Auckland University of Technology , 2017. Vol. 62, p. 19-26
Keywords [et]
gifted, children, early childhood, curriculum, text analysis
National Category
Educational Sciences
Research subject
Educational Work; Education
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:kau:diva-74469OAI: oai:DiVA.org:kau-74469DiVA, id: diva2:1344978
Available from: 2019-08-22 Created: 2019-08-22 Last updated: 2019-08-26Bibliographically approved

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CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

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Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
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