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Dewatering of Softwood Kraft Pulp with Additives of Microfibrillated Cellulose and Dialcohol Cellulose
Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Engineering and Chemical Sciences (from 2013).
BillerudKorsnäs AB, R&D Gruvön, Solna, Sweden.
Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Engineering and Chemical Sciences (from 2013).ORCID iD: 0000-0002-1256-401x
Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Engineering and Chemical Sciences (from 2013).ORCID iD: 0000-0002-5864-4576
2019 (English)In: BioResources, ISSN 1930-2126, E-ISSN 1930-2126, Vol. 14, no 3, p. 6370-6383Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The addition of nano-and micro-fibrillated cellulose to conventional softwood Kraft pulps can enhance the product performance by increasing the strength properties and enabling the use of less raw material for a given product performance. However, dewatering is a major problem when implementing these materials to conventional paper grades because of their high water retention capacity. This study investigated how vacuum dewatering is affected by different types of additives. The hypothesis was that different types of pulp additions behave differently during a process like vacuum suction, even when the different additions have the same water retention value. One reference pulp and three additives were used in a laboratory-scaled experimental study of high vacuum suction box dewatering. The results suggested that there was a linear relationship between the water retention value and how much water that could be removed with vacuum dewatering. However, the linear relationship was dependent upon the pulp type and the additives. Additions of micro-fibrillated cellulose and dialcohol cellulose to the stock led to dewatering behaviors that suggested their addition in existing full-scale production plants can be accomplished without a major redesign of the wire or high vacuum section.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
NORTH CAROLINA STATE UNIV DEPT WOOD & PAPER SCI , 2019. Vol. 14, no 3, p. 6370-6383
Keywords [en]
Vacuum dewatering, Dewatering, Microfibrillated cellulose, Dialcohol cellulose, Papermaking, Strength additives, Retention aids, Drainage, Water retention value
National Category
Chemical Engineering
Research subject
Chemical Engineering; Chemical Engineering
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:kau:diva-74224DOI: 10.15376/biores.14.3.6370-6383ISI: 000473204700100OAI: oai:DiVA.org:kau-74224DiVA, id: diva2:1340732
Available from: 2019-08-06 Created: 2019-08-06 Last updated: 2019-08-06

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Sjöstrand, BjörnUllsten, HenrikNilsson, Lars

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