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Medical Emergencies During a Half Marathon Race - The Influence of Weather
Sahlgrenska Academy, Gothenburg; Campus Vestfold, Borre.
Sahlgrenska University Hospital/Ostra, Gothenburg.
University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg.
University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg.
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2019 (English)In: International Journal of Sports Medicine, ISSN 0172-4622, E-ISSN 1439-3964, Vol. 40, no 5, p. 312-316Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The aim was to analyze the influence of weather conditions on medical emergencies in a half-marathon, specifically by evaluating its relation to the number of non-finishers, ambulance-required assistances, and collapses in need of ambulance as well as looking at the location of such emergencies on the race course. Seven years of data from the world's largest half marathon were used. Meteorological data were obtained from a nearby weather station, and the Physiological Equivalent Temperature (PET) index was used as a measure of general weather conditions. Of the 315,919 race starters, 104 runners out of the 140 ambulance-required assistances needed ambulance services due to collapses. Maximum air temperature and PET significantly co-variated with ambulance-required assistances, collapses, and non-finishers (R (2) =0.65-0.92; p=0.001-0.03). When air temperatures vary between 15-29 degrees C, an increase of 1 degrees C results in an increase of 2.5 (0.008/1000) ambulance-required assistances, 2.5 (0.008/1000) collapses (needing ambulance services), and 107 (0.34/1000) non-finishers. The results also indicate that when the daily maximum PET varies between 18-35 degrees C, an increase of 1 degrees C PET results in an increase of 1.8 collapses (0.006/1000) needing ambulance services and 66 non-finishers (0.21/1000).

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Stuttgart: GEORG THIEME VERLAG KG , 2019. Vol. 40, no 5, p. 312-316
Keywords [en]
City run, non-finishers, medical emergencies, ambulance transports, collapses
National Category
Environmental Sciences Health Sciences
Research subject
Environmental Science
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:kau:diva-72225DOI: 10.1055/a-0835-6063ISI: 000467616700003PubMedID: 30856672OAI: oai:DiVA.org:kau-72225DiVA, id: diva2:1319412
Available from: 2019-05-31 Created: 2019-05-31 Last updated: 2019-06-17Bibliographically approved

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Nilson, Finn

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